Otago Polytechnic

Archive for 2018

Events

  • Employing a builder (Mar 28 2018)

    David Finnie considers when can a builder claim more time or money?


    28 MARCH 2018, 12:00 NOON - 1:00PM

    D102, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    David's career in the construction industry began as an apprentice carpenter. During this time, he studied Quantity Surveying and worked as a Contracts Manager for seven years. David has been teaching since 2010, and has written articles for the Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building and New Zealand Construction News. His continuing studies at Massey University and close industry liaison help him to keep Otago Polytechnics Quantity Surveying and Construction Management diplomas leading edge.

    Read more about David's current research here.

     

  • Mumpreneurs - A Journey to Success (Mar 15 2018)

    Dr Jo Kirkwood is speaking to the Women in Business group in Dunedin about women entrepreneurs.


    15 MARCH 2018, 7:00-8:30PM

    PETRIDISH, LEVEL 2, 8 STAFFORD STREET, DUNEDIN

    Email us to register for this event


    Jo has been researching women entrepreneurs for nearly 20 years and will share some of the highlights of her work – particularly around how women define success in business, self-confidence issues, and strategies for managing a business and work/family.  Most recently, Jo has been working on understanding more about mumpreneurs – women who start businesses when they have young children and she will share ways that the women she studied make this successful.

    Dr Jo Kirkwood has been working in higher education in New Zealand for the past 18 years. She is experienced in teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and has particular interests and expertise in facilitation, academic mentoring and assessment at the Masters and Doctoral levels. In her early career, Jo worked as a Policy Advisor at the Ministry of Commerce (now MBIE) where she was involved as auction manager for the world’s first internet auction of radio spectrum. Jo graduated with her PhD from the University of Otago in 2004. Her thesis was focused on gender differences in motivations for entrepreneurship. Jo’s present research interests are around women entrepreneurs/mumpreneurs, Tall Poppy Syndrome and its impact on entrepreneurs, and sustainable entrepreneurs/ecopreneurs. Jo’s work is widely published in academic journals and textbooks, and practitioner publications such as NZ Business and NZ Entrepreneur. 

    Jo currently specialises in facilitating and mentoring Postgraduate Learners on the Master of Professional Practice and Doctor of Professional practice programmes. She has supervised almost 100 Masters and Doctoral students to completion and acts as an external assessor for various institutions’ postgraduate programmes. Jo is based in Dunedin, but works with learners all over the country. Jo offers flexibility in terms of when meetings occur to suit the learner. Jo is the Programme Leader for the Doctor of Professional Practice and is a mentor on this programme as well as overseeing the administrative side of our Doctoral learners.

    Read more about Jo's work here.

     

     

  • Cinema Situation (Mar 29 2018)

    Emerita Professor Hilary Radner considers changes in how we view the moving image.


     

    29 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


     

    Time-based Moving Image Installation Art and the “Cinema-Situation”

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, the moving image was confined to a relatively restricted set of viewing situations. Today, this is no longer the case. This intervention will consider the implications of these changes, particularly as they have been explored by the French film theorist Raymond Bellour.

    Hilary Radner

    Hilary Radner is Emerita Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago. Her most recent publications include a co-edited special issue on fashion and the moving image for Fashion Theory (2017) and, with Alistair Fox, Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image (Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

  • Defining literacy and criticality (Mar 22 2018)

    Steve Lovett examines literacy and criticality in art and design.


    22 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses.

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice, criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality

    Steve Lovett

    Steve Lovett is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.

  • Collections + Bits and Pieces (Mar 15 2018)

    Come and hear Andrea Daly speak about her jewellery practice.


    15 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    "My grandfather was Irish living in Scotland. He worked in China where he meet his English wife, to be, and immigrated to New Zealand. He always told stories. Every night after dinner he would enthrall us with Irish Fairy tales and other wonders. Some were obviously fictional but others such as his out of body experience or the seeing of ghosts we were never quite sure about.

    "I think I may also be a story teller but forgot to use words. The language of the object and the visual is not one I am fluent in so it is a constant struggle and a fantastic challenge. Sometimes I know what I am saying and other times I am just concentrating on the words and an unexpected story emerges. Looking back over the 33 years of my practice I realise the underlying narrative has always been about me, my fears, interests, fascinations. I have delved into the role of being a young female trying to understand the cultural forces that define me, explored language as political, gendered, structural and constrictive. Wondered if I was an artist using jewellery as my medium or a jeweller and where were the lines and who drew them? And all the time my Catholic past keeps looking for the unexplained, unexpected and impossible. Science is like a wonderland I return to and the human brain unexplored territory, anything is possible.

    "But how much can a simple piece of jewellery actually tell us?"

    Andrea Daly is a practicing jeweler and tutor who works from her own studio and has been involved in Teaching at various institutions since 1990. She is HOD Jewellery at Hungry Creek and was a Partner in Fingers Jewellery Gallery from 1991 to 2017. She studied in Australia at Sydney College of the Arts completing an undergraduate Bachelor and Post Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts majoring in Contemporary Jewellery. She later went on to complete a Masters in Philosophy First Class Honors majoring in Art History at Auckland University. Andrea exhibits nationally and internationally with works held in both public and private collections.   

  • The Highway (Mar 08 2018)

    Haere mai to Tim Croucher's Highway, a talk about a new project in painting and some of its precedents and inspirations.


    8 MARCH 2018, 12 NOON - 1.00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    "Recently I’ve been working on paintings that make an exchange between historical events of the colonial period, constructed incidents and my own personal memory and imagination of the places I spent my youth in the Manawatu and Rangatikei and latterly in Waikato and Thames Valley. These paintings have developed from several exhibition projects based on my trips in India and China that reflected on the dislocation and fantasy of travel.

    "I’ll show images of works from these projects and some source material from my current work on Haere Mai to the Highway. I’ll talk a bit about my artistic influences and methods too, if that seems relevant to the audience."

    Tim Croucher

    Tim Croucher was born in Longburn, just south of Palmerston North in 1963. He moved to Hamilton to finish high school in 1981, hated it, fell in love and went to Christchurch to study Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury. Tim painted public murals during the 80’s before returning, with some trepidation, to Hamilton to take up a teaching position at the Waikato Polytechnic. He’s worked there ever since teaching Fine Arts. Tim makes paintings for exhibition and shows his work regionally, nationally and internationally. He’s also recently got back into painting public artworks with his wife Tracy. When he can, he goes boating, and rides motorbikes with his family, digging around in the landscape and towns that for him, are iconic to his country. 

  • Ceramic Practices (Mar 01 2018)

    Our Thursday art seminar series begins at the start of March with The Ceramic Practices of Joe Bova (US) and Rob Cloughley (NZ).


    1 MARCH 2018, 12 NOON -1.00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    The presentation by Joe Bova on his Ceramic Art is termed Form and Grace. What the I Ching says about grace is as close to a truth as I know about working with clay:  "The most perfect grace consists not in external ornamentation but in allowing the original material to stand forth, beautified by being given form.”

    In conjunction, Rob Cloughley will be discussing his recent work and practice that has concluded in four collaborative installations of Rob’s ceramic sculptures in combination with Prudence Edge’s Textile sculpture.

    A member of the International Academy of Ceramics, Joe Bova was educated at the University of Houston (BFA, 1967) and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1969). A Professor Emeritus from LSU and Ohio University, in 2011 he was a Fulbright Fellow in Dublin, Ireland. Bova has taught workshops at institutions around the globe, including the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Rhode Island School of Design, Archie Bray Foundation, MT, the College of William and Mary, VA, and the Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center, China. His work is in many public and private collections, including the Arizona State University Art Museum, International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary, the National Collection of Ireland, the Los Angeles County Museum, CA, the Mint Museum of Art, NC, and the Shangyu Museum, China. Joe Bova lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Rob Cloughley has been working with clay for 23 years. He is the Ceramic Diploma Programme Coordinator and Ceramic Studio Coordinator at the Dunedin School of Art. 

  • Supporting Mental Health in the Workplace (Feb 27 2018)

    Lecturer Jodie Black is presenting on this topical subject at the next Dunedin meeting of the Human Resources Institute of New Zealand.


    27 FEBRUARY 2018, 5.30 - 7.00PM

    OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN

    COST: $25 plus GST ($20 for HRINZ members, free for HRINZ student members)


    Jodie will to provide practical, up to date information about supporting mental health in the workplace, drawing on international research and her experiences from working in this field.

    Networking to begin at 5:30 pm. Jodie will speak from 6pm.

    About The Presenter

    Jodie currently works as a Lecturer at Otago Polytechnic, teaching on the Counsellor training programme. Jodie has previously worked as the Suicide Prevention Coordinator with the Southern District Health Board and more recently assisted the University of Otago to develop a suite of training packages to support mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Jodie is currently enrolled in a Masters in Commerce to explore the use of manufacturing quality improvement approaches in the mental health and addictions sector.

    Click here to register yourself for this event

    Click here to register several people or somebody else for this event

    Image credit: Sarah Barker, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

  • Public Seminars Term 1 (Feb 12 2018)

    1 MARCH-12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Public Seminar Programme for Term 1, 2018

     

    1 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         
    The Ceramic Practices of Joe Bova (US) and Rob Cloughley (NZ) - Joe Bova and Rob Cloughley

    The presentation by Joe Bova on his Ceramic Art is termed Form and Grace. What the I Ching says about grace is as close to a truth as I know about working with clay:  "The most perfect grace consists not in external ornamentation but in allowing the original material to stand forth, beautified by being given form.”

    In conjunction, Rob Cloughley will be discussing his recent work and practice that has concluded in four collaborative installations of Rob’s ceramic sculptures in combination with Prudence Edge’s Textile sculpture.

    A member of the International Academy of Ceramics, Joe Bova was educated at the University of Houston (BFA, 1967) and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1969). A Professor Emeritus from LSU and Ohio University, in 2011 he was a Fulbright Fellow in Dublin, Ireland. Bova has taught workshops at institutions around the globe, including the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Rhode Island School of Design, Archie Bray Foundation, MT, the College of William and Mary, VA, and the Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center, China. His work is in many public and private collections, including the Arizona State University Art Museum, International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary, the National Collection of Ireland, the Los Angeles County Museum, CA, the Mint Museum of Art, NC, and the Shangyu Museum, China. Joe Bova lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Rob Cloughley has been working with clay for 23 years. He is the Ceramic Diploma Programme Coordinator and Ceramic Studio Coordinator at the Dunedin School of Art. 

     

    8 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Haere Mai to the Highway, a talk about a new project in painting and some of its precedents and inspirations - Tim Croucher

    Recently I’ve been working on paintings that make an exchange between historical events of the colonial period, constructed incidents and my own personal memory and imagination of the places I spent my youth in the Manawatu and Rangatikei and latterly in Waikato and Thames Valley. These paintings have developed from several exhibition projects based on my trips in India and China that reflected on the dislocation and fantasy of travel.

    I’ll show images of works from these projects and some source material from my current work on Haere Mai to the Highway. I’ll talk a bit about my artistic influences and methods too, if that seems relevant to the audience.

    Tim Croucher was born in Longburn, just south of Palmerston North in 1963. He moved to Hamilton to finish high school in 1981, hated it, fell in love and went to Christchurch to study Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury. Tim painted public murals during the 80’s before returning, with some trepidation, to Hamilton to take up a teaching position at the Waikato Polytechnic. He’s worked there ever since teaching Fine Arts. Tim makes paintings for exhibition and shows his work regionally, nationally and internationally. He’s also recently got back into painting public artworks with his wife Tracy. When he can, he goes boating, and rides motorbikes with his family, digging around in the landscape and towns that for him, are iconic to his country.

     

    15 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Collections + Bits and Pieces - Andrea Daly

    My grandfather was Irish living in Scotland. He worked in China where he meet his English wife, to be, and immigrated to New Zealand. He always told stories. Every night after dinner he would enthrall us with Irish Fairy tales and other wonders. Some were obviously fictional but others such as his out of body experience or the seeing of ghosts we were never quite sure about.

    I think I may also be a story teller but forgot to use words. The language of the object and the visual is not one I am fluent in so it is a constant struggle and a fantastic challenge. Sometimes I know what I am saying and other times I am just concentrating on the words and an unexpected story emerges. Looking back over the 33 years of my practice I realise the underlying narrative has always been about me, my fears, interests, fascinations. I have delved into the role of being a young female trying to understand the cultural forces that define me, explored language as political, gendered, structural and constrictive. Wondered if I was an artist using jewellery as my medium or a jeweller and where were the lines and who drew them? And all the time my Catholic past keeps looking for the unexplained, unexpected and impossible. Science is like a wonderland I return to and the human brain unexplored territory, anything is possible.

    But how much can a simple piece of jewellery actually tell us?

    Andrea Daly is a practicing jeweler and tutor who works from her own studio and has been involved in Teaching at various institutions since 1990. She is HOD Jewellery at Hungry Creek and was a Partner in Fingers Jewellery Gallery from 1991 to 2017. She studied in Australia at Sydney College of the Arts completing an undergraduate Bachelor and Post Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts majoring in Contemporary Jewellery. She later went on to complete a Masters in Philosophy First Class Honors majoring in Art History at Auckland University. Andrea exhibits nationally and internationally with works held in both public and private collections.      

     

    22 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses - Steve Lovett

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality.

    Steve Lovett  is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.​

     

    29 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Time-based Moving Image Installation Art and the “Cinema-Situation - Hilary Radner

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, the moving image was confined to a relatively restricted set of viewing situations. Today, this is no longer the case. This intervention will consider the implications of these changes, particularly as they have been explored by the French film theorist Raymond Bellour.

    Hilary Radner is Emerita Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago. Her most recent publications include a co-edited special issue on fashion and the moving image for Fashion Theory (2017) and, with Alistair Fox, Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image (Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

     

    5 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Why Art Matters: Art as Entertainment (and then some) - Patricia Hoffie

    State galleries have demonstrated overwhelming success in rising to the challenge of expanding and extending Australian audiences. Crowds flow through the doors; children drag their parents and minders in to be part of the often lavish extension services programmes they offer and focus groups get special walking-talking tours through exhibitions – often for no cost at all. Along with such success there’s been a growing association of art with entertainment. And while aesthetes and purists might scoff and bemoan that development, the association is hardly a new one. Art has twinned with entertainment in its various manifestations throughout the ages, and it’s often used the close relationship as a means of raising other issues – issues that might require longer and deeper responses than quick cheap thrills.

    This presentation addresses the issue of art and/as entertainment, and raising the question about the extent to which that inhibits or assists the aims of art.

    Prof. Patricia Hoffie AM is a Queensland based artist, writer and curator. Trained as a painter, her practice includes a range of media including installation, assemblage and sculpture. Since her first solo exhibition in Brisbane in 1974, she has exhibited extensively in Australia and internationally For several decades her work has focused on the changing nature of work, especially in relation to shifts in understanding about what might constitute a ‘work of art’ or an ‘artwork’. She has employed the theme Fully Exploited Labour to collate several decades of practice that has examined aspects of the processes whereby greater and lesser values are ascribed to particular areas of cultural production. This body of work has been used to address issues of authorship, belonging, the 'immigration problem' in Australia and a number of other subjects pertinent to the impact of globalisation on notions of 'belonging'. For three years she worked with Dr. Caroline Turner (ANU) on an ARC major grant funded series of projects under the banner Art and Human Rights. Her PhD titled Regional Values: Australian during the 1980s, awarded through University of New South Wales in 1998, has provided a national focus on regional values that has provided a fulcrum for her later work examining Australia's role in the Asia-Pacific region, a subject she researched actively through early involvement in the formative years of the Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, for which she worked as a curator and writer.

     

    12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    This seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5:00PM.


    Understanding -- Art and Research - Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz and Anna Vasof

    Artistic Research is one of the core activities at the University of Applied Arts Vienna (Die Angewandte). In view of the Angewandte`s exhibition Understanding Art and Research which will be opened on 12 April in the Dunedin School of Art Gallery, the seminar will provide an overview into the Angewandte`s approach regarding art and research activities respectively, including the exchange of personal insights via specific case scenarios. Colleagues participating in the exhibition will be present. President Gerald Bast opens with  “Surviving in the Digital Age: Why humans need art-based approaches for not to getting lost in transition“. Afterwards colleagues will present individual approaches to their art and research activities including aspects regarding collaborative projects: Cornelia Bast: “Art, Dementia and Empathy”, Konrad Strutz: “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics“ and Anna Vasof, with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of her project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz, and Anna Vasof are colleagues from the Dunedin School of Art exchange partner institution Die Angewandte (University of Applied Arts) in Vienna Austria.

    The seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5pm.

    12 April afternoon workshop from 2.30pm

    Colleagues from the Angewandte`s in Vienna will present a video by Anna Vasof with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of Anna’s project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Anna Vasof is an architect and media artist. Born in 1985, she studied architecture at the University of Thessaly (2010) in Greece and Transmedia Art (2014) at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Since 2004 her videos and short movies have been presented in several festivals, some of them winning distinctions. She’s currently writing Ph.D. thesis at the University of applied arts in Vienna about an animation technique that she develops and at the same time working on designing and building innovative mechanisms for producing critical videos, actions and installations.

    Dr. Gerald Bast is President of University of Applied Arts Vienna since 2000. Amongst other functions he held in the field of Higher Education and Research for many years he is currently member in the Representative Board of ELIA - European League of the Arts, member in the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, Editor-in-chief of the book series "Arts, Research, Innovation and Society" at Springer International Publisher. Before he became President of the "Angewandte" where he planned and implemented numerous new programmes in teaching and research, Bast was responsible for drafting the legislation for major university reforms in times when he was engaged at the Federal Ministry for Higher Education.

    Cornelia Bast is an artist, social designer and art-based researcher at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. She graduated from a Higher Biochemistry School, worked as a midwife at the University Clinic Vienna and earned a BA in Applied Arts and Design Communication and an MA in Social Design – Arts as Urban Innovation at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Her work oscillates between art, design and public performative interventions. She sees art and design primarily as media for social communication. Working in cooperation with non-profit institutions deepen insight into problems and strengthen the impact of her work. She is on the editorial board of dérive – Radio for Urban Research, and has presented her work at various international conferences.

    Konrad Strutz is a visual artist and a senior lecturer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Areas of focus in his scientific and artistic work include non-hierarchical spatial representations, and body movement in the context of communication. He received his academic education in fine arts and in computer science from the Vienna Technical University and the University of Applied Arts Vienna, respectively. Konrad‘s artwork is exhibited in Europe as well as overseas on a regular basis. Besides his position as a faculty member and a fellow of the Volkswagen foundation’s program “Arts and Science in Motion”, Konrad is currently involved in the symposium “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics” to be held in Berlin this year. www.konradstrutz.com


         

     

  • Information Day - It's not too late to enrol for 2018! (Jan 29 2018)

    We are accepting applications for a number of our first and second semester programmes – so find out why studying at Otago Polytechnic all adds up!

    Whether you have a career in mind, you are not sure which one would best suit your skills and interests or you are looking to gain the foundation skills to take on further study – come along to our information day and find out about our study options. 

    Tuesday, February 13

    4.00pm to 5.30pm

    The Hub, Ground Floor, H Block, Forth Street

    Map

  • Lithography - an enduring rarity (Jan 18 2018)

    Artist Neil Emmerson looks at how lithography has remained relevant in the visual arts and still offers artists a range of expressive qualities unique to its principles and process.


    SUNDAY 28 JANUARY 2018 2PM 

    VENUE: Toitū Otago Settlers Museum


    Lithography had its day briefly until photography became the dominant feature of pictorial reproduction. However, if not in popular culture, it has remained relevant in the visual arts and still offers artists a range of expressive qualities unique to its principles and process. Practicality has been replaced with particularity and artists who engage in Print seek it out and utilise it for the production of limited edition prints that come out of professional studio workshops.

    Neil Emmerson is a Senior Lecturer and coordinates the Print Studio at the Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic. Neil has a Master in Visual Arts from the Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney. His research expertise spans a broad range of Printrelated technologies, Identity Politics, Queer Theory, and Gay and Lesbian History. According to Kirsty Grant (Curator, Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Victoria), his subject matter is political, both in terms of the critical focus it directs towards aspects of contemporary social and cultural life, and through its consistent projection of gay experience into the public realm (excerpt from Contemporary Australian Printmaking). He has been selected for numerous print related survey exhibitions at major public galleries in Australia and New Zealand since the 1990s and his work is held in the collections of major public institutions like the Auckland Art Gallery, Australian National Gallery in Canberra, the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. In 2006 he was awarded the Fremantle Print Award. He has been an artist in residence with Cork Printmakers in Ireland in 2013, and at RMIT University in Melbourne in 2016.

     

     

  • Insider Knowledge & Collaboration (Feb 07 2018)

    We are pleased to be hosting a visit from international scholar Professor Vaneeta D'Andrea.


    7 FEBRUARY 2018, 5.30 - 6.30PM, THE HUB, FORTH STREET, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC

    FREE EVENT


    Keys to Success in Tertiary Education: Insider Knowledge & Collaboration

    The focus of this discussion will be lessons learned over a near 50 year career in Tertiary Education. The keys to the success of staff and institutions in this sector are understanding the expectations for all work carried out (insider knowledge) and the value of collaborating in as many ways as possible. Examples from the career of Professor Emerita Vaneeta D’Andrea will provide real life lessons on how to be successful in Tertiary Education settings. Her career spans fifty years and posts on several continents. 

    Professor Vaneeta D'Andrea is Professor Emerita at the University of the Arts London, a Carnegie Scholar with extensive experience in International Higher Education. She has led Learning and Teaching development and operations for international sector bodies and universities in the United States and the United Kingdom. She is a co-author of Improving Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, which advocates the Quality Development model for driving improvement in tertiary education. She currently divides her time between the California and London, UK,  facilitating global consultancy  - her current work with government bodies and education providers spans The Americas, Europe, Asia and the Pacific region. 

     

  • Foundation Learning information sessions coming to a library near you (Dec 14 2017)

    Keen to do further study or enter the workforce – but need to polish up on some basic skills?

    .... and your fees could be free*!

    Our practical, supportive Foundation Learning programmes can help improve your English, Numeracy, Computer skills, Study skills, and Employment skills.

    We also offer electives that will help you pursue a career in a number of key industries including health, beauty therapy, tourism and engineering.

    Find out more at our information sessions:

    Tuesday 16 January

    • Balclutha Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • Milton Library – 11.30am to 12.00pm

    Wednesday 17 January

    • Mosgiel Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • South Dunedin Library – 11.30am to 12.00pm

    Thursday 18 January

    • Dunedin Public Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • Waikouaiti Library – 2.00pm to 2.30pm

    Find out more about our Foundation Learning programmes

    *Conditions apply

  • Unbound: Liberating Women (Sep 21 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic will host the 2018 symposium of the Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand.


    21 - 23 SEPTEMBER 2018, THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, DUNEDIN


    This year's conference title is "Unbound: Liberating women". Recognising 125 years of women’s suffrage in New Zealand, the 2018 CTANZ symposium offers an opportunity to explore the past, present or future roles of dress and textiles in women’s suffrage and other liberating moments. How do cloth, clothes, fashion and art reveal, reflect or challenge social limits for women?

    In the spirit of the early suffragists, how might they empower futures and/or relate to feminist projects? How are they used to give or constrain political voice? When is cloth revolutionary?

    By focusing on liberating women, Unbound celebrates the power of cloth and clothes in the visual, material world and explores how women make, use, transform and transcend boundaries.

    Themes include

    • Liberating women
    • Diversity, equity, participation
    • Women’s work
    • Dressing for revolution
    • Political cloth
    • Gender and diversity
    • Cloth and agency, bound and unbound

    Closing date for abstracts will be 1 June 2018

    Visit the CTANZ website for more information on submissions for the symposium and for the juried exhibition that will run alongside the symposium, opening on 21 September 2018.

     

  • Art and Oceans (Jul 16 2018)

    The theme for this year's Art and Science project is Art and Oceans.


    16 - 31 JULY 2018, H D SKINNER ANNEX, OTAGO MUSEUM


     

  • Tech Week 2018 (May 19 2018)

    The theme for Techweek 2018 is innovation that's good for the world. 


    19 - 27 MAY 2018


    Click here to find out more about how you can be involved in Techweek 2018, for example by running, hosting or assisting with any events.

    The Dunedin Techweek programme will be launched at SIGNAL ICT Graduate School, 123 Vogel Street, 5-7pm on Wednesday 21 March 2018.

    Watch this space for more details of events we'll host at Otago Polytechnic or otherwise be involved with to share our technologival innovations. 

     

News

  • Welcome Back - ART Week 1 Timetable (Feb 12 2018)

    Welcome to the 2018 year. The first day for Year One, Two, NEW Bachelor of Visual Arts Year Three and Graduate Diploma students is: Monday 19th February 2018 at 9am. 

    Come to Room P152 at the Dunedin School of Art buildings, Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Leith block, Building P, main entrance off Riego Street.

    P Block is located between Riego Street, Anzac Avenue and The Water of Leith. See map.

     

    Monday 19th February from 9:00AM

     9:00AM Welcome & Introduction to the school by Acting Head of School Clive Humphreys, DSA Students, Andrew Last & all staff: Room P152 Rūma Kauhau. This will be followed by an introduction to the timetable for the week.

    10:00AM Art school tours

    11.30AM Art BBQ at P Block Main entrance

    1:00PM The Drawing Thing: Meet at O Block with Michelle Beevors and Kiri Mitchell.

    (concurrently Cumberland Street students will be having a tour of the art school campus )

    2.30PM Mihi Whakatau for all students: The Hub, main Otago Polytechnic Building, Forth Street

     3:00PM ID cards: The Hub

     

    Tuesday 20th Februaryfrom 9:00AM

    Powhiri for Māori Students & Gallery Tours

    Powhiri will be held at Puketeraki Marae in Karitane on Tuesday 20 February. We have ordered a bus, which will depart from Manaaki at 9.00AM.  Please RSVP to tepunakaowheo@op.ac.nz to reserve a seat.

    9:00AM and 3:00PM Gallery activities: Meet at P152 for directions

     

    Wednesday 21st February from 10.30AM

    10.30AM  Art History & Theory 1:  Meet in P152

    10.30AM  New BVA3 & Graduate Diploma Students Intro:  P201

     

    Thursday 22nd February from 9:00AM

     9:00AM BVA2 meet in your Studio areas

    10:00AM BVA1 and other NEW students Curriculum & Calendar Information in P152 with Mark Bolland, Undergraduate Programme Manager.

     1:00PM Film Sessions and workshops followed by drinks and light refreshments.

    Programme arranged by Michael Morley and David Green. Screening rooms will be P152, P201, P202.

     

    Friday 23rd February

     9:00AM Introductions to Otago Polytechnic support staff and resources, including Student Success, counsellors, etc. Meet in P152.

    Followed by IT Inductions & H&S: P152 & P103 Computer lab.

     

     

  • Village apartment spots available (Jan 19 2018)

    As the opening date of our new on-campus Student Village looms, so does the opportunity to sign up for a unique Dunedin experience – apartment living that offers all the benefits of communal flatting but none of the downsides.

    Otago Polytechnic’s Student Village, which officially opens on Sunday 11 February, is just a short walk from campus and minutes from the city centre.

    The five-storey, 231-bed furnished residential hub comprises fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. The dorms and studios are full, but we have several apartment bedrooms still available.

    The apartments would suit students wanting to live with friends (a group can request to live together) or those looking to make new friends while living in a safe and secure environment.

    In addition to each student having a fully furnished bedroom, the apartments offer two bathrooms, and there is plenty of space for friends to visit, including access to communal areas (yay, pool tables!).

    Internet and power are included in the price, too, meaning no surprise bills . . . and no arguments.

    For more information, visit here.

  • Residents enjoying life at Te Pā Tauira (Feb 21 2018)

    Accolades, as well as lots of activity, are flowing through the light-filled spaces of Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village.

    As residents settle into their new lives at Te Tauira, they are discovering the many benefits of the built-for-purpose facility which, with its mixture of dorm rooms and apartments, has a maximum capacity of 231.

    Students have already enjoyed movie nights, a quiz night, a sports day and a speed meet, all designed to bring people together.

    “The events help you get to know people on the floor quite well, and they make it a competition," says resident Nicole Woollard, from Christchurch.

    Resident assistant Mhairi Duncan praised the size of her room, which has three windows, a queen bed, desk, an ensuite and a wardrobe.

    She has also been enjoying the social atmosphere of Te Pā Tauira.

    "You miss out on that when you stay at home. Also, my friends’ flats were horrible so I didn’t want to move into a flat."

    Te Pā Tauira manager Andy Thompson says the facility is more than an accommodation centre.

    “We’re developing young people as leaders."

    Read the Otago Daily Times article here

    Read more about the Student Village here

     

     

     

  • Welcome to international ceramicist Joe Bova - Artist in Residence (Feb 20 2018)

    The Dunedin School of Art welcomed their first 2018 Artist in Residence this week: Ceramicist Joe Bova.

    Joe’s home and studio is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he has lived since 2004 after retiring from Ohio University. His undergraduate education was at the University of Houston after serving in the Air Force. His Masters is from the University of New Mexico and he is a Professor Emeritus from both LSU and Ohio University, where he was the Director of the School of Art for 7 years.

    A past president and a Fellow of NCECA Bova was awarded the NCECA Excellence in Teaching Award in 2006. Other awards include the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art Fellowship, a SAF/NEA Fellowship, several university sabbatical awards, and a fellowship to the International Ceramics Studio (ICS) in Kecskemet, Hungary in 2004. The International Academy of Ceramics, Geneva, elected him a member in 2005. His Fulbright Fellowship took him to Dublin, Ireland for 2011. Visiting artist appointments include the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Haystack School in Maine, Rhode Island School of Design, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, CO; and the Archie Bray Foundation, MT. He has taught at Penland School, NC many times and he also served as a Trustee and was Chair of the Board. Joe was a distinguished Artist in Residence at Florida Atlantic University 2014 - 2015 and in the spring semester 2016 he was the Class of 1936 Distinguished Artist in Residence at The College of William and Mary, in Williamsburg VA. The Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center in China invited him to a Residency last summer. His work is in the collections of the Arizona State University Art Museum; Crocker Art Museum, CA.; Greenville Museum of Art, SC; International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary; Los Angeles County Museum, CA; Mint Museum of Art, NC; the San Angelo Museum of Art, TX, and the Shangyu Museum, China. The Archie Bray Foundation and Red Lodge Ceramic Arts Center in Montana have hosted him as an Artist in Resident.

    His work in ceramics using animal imagery was first inspired by the realities of hunting and fishing trips, and later by their power as symbols, surrogates and totems. He shows regularly with Sherrie Gallerie in Columbus, Ohio and his recent solo exhibition was April/May 2017.

    Joe will be at the Dunedin School of Art for 5-6 weeks and will present a lunchtime seminar jointly with Rob Cloughley on 1 March. He is staying on campus in the art residency house and has a studio space in Ceramics.

    (image credit: work by Joe Bova - Aesops Game, to see more of Joe's work see https://www.joebova.studio/)

     

    copyright Joe Bova - Aesops Game

     

     

     

  • A chance to support Wildlife Hospital (Feb 16 2018)

    Keen to get stuck in and help the Wildlife Hospital? Want to know more?

    Come along to Orientation Week, when the Wildlife Hospital Students’ Association (WHSA) will be recruiting new volunteers to support the facility which, since opening in January, has treated dozens of injured birds, including a rare takahe.

    On Thursday February 22 (Clubs Day), WHSA members will be joined by two Pulse Energy Highlanders players on the Otago Museum Reserve (unless it is awful weather, in which case it will be inside the University Link) from 10am-3pm.

    Come along to the WHSA tent and join in the chance to play games, compete against others students and win spot prizes, including coffee and food vouchers donated by AllPress, Vogel St Kitchen and the Good Earth, as well as passes to Orokonui Ecosanctuary.

    And rugby (and wildlife) fans take note – signed Highlanders merchandise will be given away, too! That’s because the Highlanders have formed a community partnership with the Wildlife Hospital.

    As well as putting up posters around Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago, WHSA executive members will be easily to spot in their Wildlife Hospital T-shirts.

    They’re a friendly bunch and welcome anyone to approach them with questions. 

    For more about the Wildlife Hospital visit here >

     

  • A fresh idea (Feb 16 2018)

    The innovation of Otago Polytechnic's Food Design programme has come to fruition in a range of edible produce replicas – all with a taste twist.

    Examples include a dahl curry encased in turmeric chocolate and presented in a chilli, and an apple pie smoothie in the form of a Granny Smith apple hanging from a tree.

    Otago Polytechnic Food Design academics Timothy Lynch and Tony Heptinstall developed the new technique in consultation with EPIC, Otago Polytechnic’s R & D Centre, after being approached by Sanitarium.

    The work, believed to be a New Zealand first, was showcased as part of a “So Good Garden of Goodness”, an edible ''garden'' comprising 3000 products, at Auckland’s Britomart this month.

    The food-art process began with the creation of food-grade silicone moulds used to create vegan chocolate shells, which are filled with a variety of recipes based on Sanitarium’s So Good non-dairy milk products.

    “The process involves working with natural products to design handcrafted foods that look identical to fruit and vegetables but are filled with contrasting flavours,” explains Timothy, who lectures on sustainability in the food industry. 

    The technique allows chefs to produce large quantities of artistically designed food products by hand – yet on a commercial scale with a small team and at reduced cost. 

    Tony says one of the objectives was to increase current industry capital through collaborations between the food industry and higher education sector. 

    “We were conscious that in order to inspire the students we needed to take on a challenge that solved a real-world problem and used design thinking at the same time,” he says. 

    Sanitarium marketing business manager Hayley Scott says the outcome surpassed expectations. 

    “We approached Otago Polytechnic to help us come up with a way to show Kiwis how non-dairy milks can be used creatively in kitchens around the country. 

    “Throughout their collaboration with their students and colleagues they have completely embraced this challenge and we have been amazed at what they have been able to produce.”

    Watch Breakfast TV interview with Tim and Tony

    Want to know about our innovative culinary programmes? Read here

     

  • A fresh angle on architecture (Feb 14 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic will celebrate architecture in its various exciting forms next week.

    A wide-ranging exhibition at the Hub marks the 2017 introduction of the three-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies (Architectural Technology or Interior Architecture) at Otago Polytechnic.

    The exhibition will showcase a range of creative outcomes achieved by first-year learners.

    These include books of hand-drawings and computer-aided design reconfigured using Photoshop, conceptual drawings in charcoal, digital collage, and experimental processes, as well as technical drafting. Architectural models supporting the design projects will also be on display.

    The exhibition opens at the Hub, Forth St, Dunedin, on Thursday 22 February at 5.30pm and runs until Friday 2 March.

    For more information on our Architecture programmes, visit

  • iD Fashion finalists named (May 03 2018)

    Forty-six emerging designers from around the globe will showcase the latest in fashion innovation and creativity as they compete for top prizes in this year’s prestigious iD International Emerging Designer Shows, to be held at the Dunedin Town Hall on 3-4 May.

    The finalists, selected from a record 200 entries, will travel to Dunedin from their home countries to be judged by an international panel of experts at the new-look iD International Emerging Show, supported by Otago Polytechnic.

    “As Australasia’s only international emerging fashion competition, designers from the top fashion schools around the world are eager to come to Dunedin to network and to launch their collections on a global platform,” says Dr Margo Barton, Professor of Fashion and iD Dunedin Fashion Creative Director.

    “The talent on show for 2018 is pushing boundaries with diverse cultural and personal identities explored through their fashion languages,” Margo, Otago Polytechnic’s Academic Leader-Fashion, says.

    “This is a unique opportunity to be amazed by the future of the world’s fashion, right here in Dunedin.”

    The Emerging Shows will take centre stage as the main show at this year’s reinvigorated iD Dunedin Fashion event, held from 2-6 May and funded by the Dunedin City Council. The main shows will be held over two nights at the Dunedin Town Hall.

    This year’s Emerging selection committee, made up of Kiwi fashion designers Tanya Carlson, Benny Castles (WORLD), and Margi Robertson (NOM*d), noted the exceptional standard of entries from around the world, which made selecting a pool of finalists extremely difficult. 

    This year’s finalists include Otago Polytechnic graduate Dylan McCutcheon-Peat.

    Prizes include $6000 for the H&J First Place winner, $4000 for the Rodd and Gunn Second Place, $2000 for the Gallery de Novo Third Place ($2000) and a range of other special prizes.

    iD Dunedin Fashion tickets go on sale on Monday 26 February through Ticketmaster.co.nz

    For more information on our Bachelor of Design (Fashion) programme, visit

  • Top Turf scholarship announced (Feb 14 2018)

    Sean Purdy, from Kauri Cliffs Golf Course in Northland, has been awarded NZ Golf’s Top Turf scholarship.

    The scholarship is fiercely contested by students working towards Otago Polytechnic’s New Zealand Certificate in Horticulture Services (Sports Turf).

    Based at our Cromwell campus, it is the only full-time Sports Turf programme on offer in New Zealand.

    The programme provides a balance of theoretical and practical studies. Learners benefit from the close proximity to world renowned sports facilities, as well as an outdoor turf training facility that has been established specifically to cater for this qualification.

    For example, Otago Polytechnic Horticulture lecturer John Prunnell and Year 1 students will head to Millbrook Resort, near Queenstown, on 27 February, when they will help prepare the course for the showpiece event on our national golf calendar – the ISPA Handa New Zealand Open, to will be held on 1-4 March. 

    Meanwhile Year-2 students like Sean continue their internships at some of the country’s most prestigious turf venues.

    For more information about our Sports Turf programme, visit

     

     

     

     

  • Public Exhibition: 2018 Dunedin School of Art POSTGRADUATE Season (Feb 12 2018)

    19 FEB - 6 APRIL, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST

     

    Master of Visual Arts
    Nelson (Shin Nei), Nostalgia, 19 February – 23 February
    Arati Kuswaha, Slow Decay, 26 February – 2 March
    Yong Wei Lim, Surroundings, 5 March – 9 March


    Master of Fine Arts
    Susan Videler, Wearing the Wound Secrets, Rituals and Beliefs, 12 March – 16 March
    Justine Turnbull, The Alchemy of Exile, 19 March – 23 March (Monday Holiday)
    Rob Haultain, Mind Your Hands, 26 March – 6 April (Friday, Monday, Tuesday Easter Holiday)

    DSA GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

     GALLERY HOURS
    Monday to Friday
    10am – 4pm

     

     

     

     

  • 2018 PIN conference in Arizona (Feb 12 2018)

    Registrations for the PIN (Postsecondary International Network) annual conference in Arizona open on 1 March, 2018.

    An international alliance of postsecondary and community-technical institutions, PIN’s executive includes Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker, who works with other senior tertiary executives to improve outcomes for learners, share information among institutions, promote international cooperation and engage in issues critical to the sector.

    Held in Auckland last year, the 2018 conference will open in Prescott, Arizona, on 23 September.

    For more information visit the PIN 2018 conference website.

     

     

  • Call for Papers - Junctures: the Journal for Thematic Dialogue (Feb 12 2018)

    Expressions of interest open now. Final deadline for papers: 30 April,2018. Editor: Marc Doesburg.

    Arms and legs of the plundered sea, for whom is it you dance?

    from Southern Pacific Ocean by Gregory O’Brien

    Oceans and seas end here, in New Zealand. A useful transport route, oceans have over millennia facilitated the movement of peoples. Settlement of New Zealand was a result of planned colonialization by Māori, and Europeans in turn. Oceans have been navigated in search of opportunity, and have been a barrier fostering insularity. They facilitate contact with the other, but demand negotiation of cohabitation.

    Realm of Tangaroa, god of the sea, oceans feature fascinating and fearful creatures, both real and imaginary. They have been an inexhaustible supply of food, giving and sustaining. They are a source of energy, with reserves of gas and oil and minerals.

    But oceans are suffering from exploitation: they are a convenient dumping ground, are overfished, are suffering from acidification and a drop in the pH level, and are indicators of global warming, with rising sea levels resulting in climate refugees.

    Junctures: the Journal for Thematic Dialogue invites submissions from authors on the theme of oceans, whether from the hard sciences, humanities, visual, sonic and performing arts, social sciences, law, education or medicine.

     

    Call for Papers:Junctures: The Journal of Thematic Dialogue
    Expressions of interest open now.
    Final deadline for papers: 30 April 2018
    Editor: Marc Doesburg, Director Global Engagements
    marc.doesburg@op.ac.nz or junctures@op.ac.nz

     

    Gregory O’Brien, Whale Years, (Auckland University Press, Auckland 2015), 20.

    (photo by Marc Doesburg)

  • Opening doors to students (Feb 09 2018)

    Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village, will open its doors to students on Sunday 11 February. 

    Just a short walk from campus and Dunedin’s city centre, the $20 million, 231-bed furnished residential village offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    Te Pā Tauira was officially blessed on Wednesday by Kai Tahu representative Tahu Potiki, who performed a series of karakia.

    The ceremony was attended by more than 80 people, including Otago Polytechnic Council Chair Kathy Grant and CEO Phil Ker, who praised the complex’s high standard of workmanship, outstanding design and sustainable principles.

    “We have set a new benchmark in student accommodation,” Phil said.

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, Te Pā Tauira uses sustainable materials throughout, including laminated timber within its unique structural frame. 

    Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village, is managed by global student accommodation specialist Campus Living Villages who operate in prominent locations around the world.

    The name Te Pā Tauira was gifted by Ōtākou Rūnaka in 2017, along with each of the names for the five floors – Hawea, Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu (these are names of the southern tribes who have migrated to the South Island over centuries).

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira here

     

  • Dating dinner to raise funds (Feb 07 2018)

    Josh Perry is following the official launch of his dating website last month with a dinner aimed at raising funds for Enabling Love.

    The dinner, to be held tomorrow night at Dunedin venue Vault 21, includes optional speed dating.

    An Otago Polytechnic business and marketing graduate, Josh (26) is also in a wheelchair and knows how difficult it can be to meet others.

    So he set up Enabling Love in response to a need expressed by members of the disability community.

    “Enabling Love is run for people with disabilities by people living with disability.”

    To register for the 8.30pm dinner ($25 gets you dinner and a drink) on Thursday, February 8, email enquiries@enablinglove.nz

    For more information, visit: http://enablinglove.nz/

  • Costume Textiles Association of NZ and Otago Polytechnic - Call for Papers and Exhibition (Feb 07 2018)

    This year, Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium, organised in partnership with the Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ) and the School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic – Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, will be held in September, 21-23, 2018. CTANZ is a national organisation that provides a forum for the study, research and conservation of dress and textiles. Established in 2002, this will be the 18th national presentation of the symposium.

     

    The exhibition, Unbound opens Friday 21st September to launch Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium in the DSA Gallery, The Dunedin School of Art (evening is open to the public). The symposium will be held in The HUB and G Block on Saturday 22 & Sunday 23 September, 2018.

     

    Unbound: 22nd September – 18th October 2018. The Dunedin School of Art Gallery, Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand. The exhibition Unbound is a quality assured, peer-reviewed project curated by Dr Natalie Smith and Victoria Bell.

      

    See Attached Calls for Exhibition Proposals and Symposium Papers.

     

  • A Collision of Cultures (Mar 02 2018)

    Dunedin artist Graham Fletcher is preparing to stage an extensive survey show as part of the 2018 Auckland Arts Festival exhibition.


    2 MARCH - 28 APRIL 2018, GUS FISHER GALLERY, AUCKLAND


    The Third Space: Ambiguity in the art of Graham Fletcher incorporates large tracts of what he terms “Lounge-Room Tribalism”. A Senior Lecturer at Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art, Fletcher is also Studio Coordinator for Painting and Pasifika advisor and has exhibited nationally and internationally. Of mixed Samoan and European heritage, Fletcher is focused on a fundamental cultural question: how art from indigenous cultures have been appropriated and repurposed into contemporary domestic settings.

    “These objects become disenfranchised when placed into new environments,” Fletcher explains. The theme builds on his doctoral studies (Myth, Magic, Mimicry, and the Cross-Cultural Imaginary; Elam, 2006-2010), during which Fletcher travelled to Europe, visiting galleries and prominent museums.

    “I was inspired by the very same ethnographic artefacts that influenced the works of notable artists such as Picasso, Matisse and the Surrealists.” While wandering through the Centre Pompidou, Paris, Fletcher came across an installation of objects collected by André Breton. It comprised more than 260 pieces, ranging from tribal artefacts, natural objects, antique furniture, stuffed animals and trinkets, to paintings, drawings, sculptures and more. An accompanying plaque revealed Breton had collected more than 5000 pieces. “The Pompidou managed to salvage one complete wall from his apartment for permanent display,” Fletcher says. “It was like nothing I had seen before.” 

    Yet, on a reduced scale, he had. Fletcher recalls a chance visit to a house in the Auckland inner-city suburb of Mt Eden in the 1990s. “I had to go and collect an art work at a bungalow in Mt Eden. I knocked on the door and this elderly woman answered. “I wandered in and, my God, it was like a museum. There were tribal objects all over the place, art works all over the walls, including by key New Zealand artists. “All this stuff was put together quite nicely. She had obviously taken great care in placing things. She was trying to create some sort of discussion between the works.”

    Fletcher’s paintings, too, address the same conversation – the tension that occurs when these different worlds mix.

    “It’s about taking something from the Old World and placing it in the New. We all do it to some extent. I have a number of carvings and other ethnographic objects at home, although I will say they are of tourist item quality. I think of myself more as a documentarian. My works comprise collages of many parts but I don’t distort the cultural objects in any way, apart from making them bigger or smaller. I have tried to stay true to the objects.”

    The Third Space: Ambiguity in the art of Graham Fletcher  features works made by Graham Fletcher over 20 years of exhibiting as a professional artist.

  • Highlanders partner with Wildlife Hospital (Jan 29 2018)

    The Pulse Energy Highlanders have formed a community partnership with the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital.

    The hospital is the first specialised wildlife hospital in the South Island and will be able to treat up to 500 patients a year once it is fully operational.

    The need for this type of hospital was highlighted in a 2017 report by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment that identified 80% of native species are at risk of extinction.

    Co-chair of the Wildlife Hospital Trust Steve Walker is “delighted" with the arrangement.

    "Given that we are a recent start-up Charitable Trust, this shows the belief the Highlanders have in our mission and confidence that the community will get behind the Hospital to help keep it funded.”

    The hospital is hosted at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing.

    It opened on 15 January, admitting two adult yellow-eyed penguins the same day. 

    Highlanders General Manager of Commercial and Marketing Amelia Kininmonth hoped that this community partnership would assist the Wildlife Hospital with its initiatives, highlight what an asset the Wildlife hospital is to the community and assist with fundraising.

    "We view ourselves as very much part of the local community, and we want to help make our home town a better place. This community partnership is one of a number of activities and events we want to associate with in the future.”

    For further enquiries about the Wildlife Hospital, please contact Wildlife Hospital Trust co-chair Steve Walker. Emai: walkersteve4@gmail.com; ph: 027 850 5603

     

  • New dating website launched (Jan 26 2018)

    Josh Perry, an Otago Polytechnic business and marketing graduate, officially launched his dating website this week.

    Josh is an outgoing 26-year-old Kiwi male. He is also in a wheelchair and knows how difficult it can be to meet others.

    So he set up Enabling Love in response to a need expressed by members of the disability community.

    “Enabling Love is run for people with disabilities by people living with disability,” Josh explains. 

    “We understand the challenges of meeting others through dating sites and have decided to set up our own inclusive service. We aim to provide a safe environment for individuals to meet new friends and form new connections and relationships.”

    For more information, visit: http://enablinglove.nz/

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

    Read the Stuff article

  • Protecting the vulnerable (Jan 23 2018)

    As the only trained wildlife veterinary doctor practising in the South Island, Dr Lisa Argilla is playing a huge role in the conservation of some of this country's most endangered species.

     

    She works at The Wildlife Hospital at Otago Polytechnic's School of Veterinary Nursing in Dunedin, which has now been open just over a week - and it's been flat out from day one!

     

    Read more about Dr Argilla and her work in this wonderful Otago Daily Times feature.

     

    Find out more about studying Veterinary Nursing at Otago Polytechnic.

     

     

     

     

  • Takahe admitted to Wildlife Hospital (Jan 16 2018)

    A rare female takahē has been admitted to the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital today, highlighting the importance of the facility to the rehabilitation of various precious species that live in the South.

    Based at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing, the facility is the only specialist wildlife hospital to treat sick and injured native animals in the South Island.

    A partnership between Otago Polytechnic and The Wildlife Hospital Trust, the hospital will be able to treat up to 500 animals per year when staffed at full capacity.

    “Widget” the takahē was observed to have a leg injury and took a three and a-half hour journey by car from Te Anau to the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital for diagnosis and treatment if required*. 

    Widget will be housed in her own ward, complete with native foliage donated yesterday by the Dunedin Botanic Garden (Dunedin City Council), Blueskin Nurseries and Ribbonwood Nurseries.

    Still, she won’t be entirely alone. Two yellow-eyed penguins, admitted to the hospital on its opening day on Monday, are just down the corridor.

    Takahē have a threat classification of “Nationally Vulnerable” (reclassified from “Nationally Critical” in 2017). As at October 1, 2017, there are 347 takahē in existence.

    Widget was hatched in October 2004 and taken from a nest from the wild takahē population in the Murchison Mountains, Fiordland, and incubated and puppet-raised by rangers at the Burwood Takahē Centre, near Te Anau.

    She currently lives at the Burwood Takahē Centre with her partner Charles and their family of two sub-adults (last-season chicks) and two chicks.

    Widget has made a considerable contribution to the Department of Conservation’s Takahē Recovery Programme, raising just under 20 chicks to date. She is a described by DOC staff as a “very devoted and relaxed parent”. 

    Widget and her family are among 30 founding birds destined to be released into Kahurangi National Park early this year as the Takahē Recovery Programme attempts to establish a second wild takahē population. 

    “The Takahē Recovery Programme is hoping Widget makes a speedy recovery so she can move to her new home in the wild,” Julie Harvey, Takahē Advocacy Ranger, Department of Conservation — Te Papa Atawhai, says.

    “The TRP welcomes the opening of the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital given its skilled and expert staff.”

    Julie also praised the benefits of having such a facility in the South.

    “The Wildlife Hospital’s close proximity to the Burwood Takahē Centre, the hub of the takahē breeding programme, reduces the travel times for birds who are likely to be stressed due to injury or illness.”

    Steve Walker, the Co-Chair of the Wildlife Hospital Trust, agrees:

    “Although we didn’t expect to receive a takahē on our second day, it does vindicate our point that establishing a hospital in Dunedin would reduce travel time – and therefore trauma.

    “For example, had we not been open, Widget the takahē would have likely faced a long flight to Palmerston North to be treated,” Steve says.

    “In an ideal world, we wouldn’t see any takahē through our doors, but we are delighted to be able to help this bird.”

    Visit the Wildlife Hospital's website and Facebook page.

    Find out more about studying Veterinary Nursing at Otago Polytechnic

     

     

     

  • A new dawn for wildlife care (Jan 11 2018)

    The opening of the Wildlife Hospital in Dunedin on Monday 15 January heralds an exciting new chapter in both animal care and veterinarian education.

    Based at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing, the facility will be the only specialist wildlife hospital to treat sick and injured native animals in the South Island.

    A partnership between Otago Polytechnic and The Wildlife Hospital Trust, the hospital will be able to treat up to 500 animals per year when staffed at full capacity.

    “Not only will the hospital save precious wildlife, it will also provide great learning opportunities for our students, reinforcing our leadership in veterinarian nursing education,” Phil Ker, Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive, says.

    Jo Brady, Otago Polytechnic Deputy Chief Executive, People, Performance and Development, believes the Wildlife Hospital’s intrinsic connection to veterinary nursing teaching will attract plenty of international interest

    “We hope students might come from around the globe to study here.”

    “There are a lot of other benefits for Otago and the South Island, too,” Jo says.

    “It means we can treat species that otherwise might not receive medical care.It is about preserving future generations of wildlife – for our future generations.”

    Dr Lisa Argilla, one of New Zealand’s best-known wildlife veterinary surgeons, will run the hospital alongside accomplished wildlife veterinary nurse Angelina Martelli.

    Both have recently moved to Dunedin to be involved in the initiative.

    “I first had the idea for a Wildlife Hospital in the South Island in 2013,” Lisa says.

    “Now we are just a few days away from realising this vision.

    “Angelina, our senior wildlife vet nurse, and I are really excited to be starting on Monday, setting up the equipment and admitting the first patients."

    Andy Cunningham, the Co-Chair of the Wildlife Hospital Trust, acknowledges Otago Polytechnic’s “vision for the partnership”. He also thanks the Department of Conservation and several other organisations for their contributions.

    “We’ve had the most amazing support from charitable funders, who have helped us purchase much of the specialist equipment we need to keep our operating costs down, as well as make the hospital operate as smoothly as possible.

    “We’re intrigued to see what our first patient will be. I would only offer short odds on it being either a Yellow-eyed Penguin or a Kereru!”

    Visit the Wildlife Hospital's website and Facebook page.

    Find out more about studying Veterinary Nursing at Otago Polytechnic

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Doctor of Professional Practice launched (Jan 10 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has launched a Doctor of Professional Practice – a programme for people looking to achieve a high-level qualification while also making a significant contribution to their organisation, hapū, iwi, community or profession.

    The inaugural doctorate programme, which began on January 4, features five highly skilled learners, all of whom gained entry after a rigorous, competitive selection process.

    “The learners are interviewed,” Jo Kirkwood, programme coordinator, explains. “We need to be sure the people who are accepted are a good fit.

    The Doctor of Professional Practice (DPP) is an innovative initiative run by Capable NZ. It allows learners to design new professional and personal learning goals, and then complete a substantial piece of research (including a 50,000-word thesis) over at least three years.

    A key difference between the DPP and a traditional doctorate is that learners do not have to give up work in order to study. Instead, the programme is integrated with leaners’ work, enabling them to focus on a topic that enhances their work practices if they wish. 

    Significantly, those enrolled in the DPP are looking to help others.

    For example, Bay of Plenty businesswoman and teacher Mawera Karetai’s studies will include an investigation into the dynamics of social welfare support systems.

    “Someone on a benefit might have to go through a process such as a benefit review panel. If that person has a low level of literacy they might not understand what’s happening,” Mawera says.

    Suzie Bartlett, meanwhile, will research the resilience of undergraduate nursing students working in a mental health clinical environment.

    A senior lecturer and course coordinator in nursing at Otago Polytechnic, Suzie has a close-up view of student pressures.

    “Around 20% of the population suffers from a form of mental illness – and that includes our student cohort.

    “When students are immersed in an acute mental health environment, they may start suffering from issues themselves.”

    Another Otago Polytechnic academic, Adrian Woodhouse, is examining educational practices – specifically within the Bachelor of Culinary Arts (BCA) programme.

    The academic leader of the BCA, Adrian advocates a more “humanist” approach to teaching, focusing on students’ motivations and goals.

    “There are these widely held views that a good chef wears a white jacket and works in a stressful environment. That is a social construct. It’s not reality.”

    Read more about our Doctor of Professional Practice

    Read more about Capable NZ

     

     

  • Thinking outside the box (Dec 13 2017)

    “Inspirational” is the first word that comes to mind for three Otago Polytechnic students who have recently returned from the Sino-New Zealand Model Programme symposium in Tianjin, China.

    April Henderson, Jane Armour-Raudon and Evelyn Araujo arrived back in Dunedin earlier this month buoyed by an international experience that included collaborating with three Chinese students in a “start-up business model workshop”.

    Marc Doesburg, Otago Polytechnic’s Director Internationalisation, says the workshop provides an “extraordinary” opportunity for second-year Bachelor of Applied Management students.

    “It challenges the students’ assumptions, and provides a unique and rigorous environment in which entrepreneurial ideas can be tested and developed.

    “As well as being stimulated, the students experience a certain level of discomfort, too. In having their ideas objectively evaluated and challenged, they grow in confidence.

    “We see both a personal and professional transformation in our students,” says Marc, who accompanied the trio to China.

    “That’s a key reason behind the forum – in fact, all of our international partnerships. The aim is to provide experiences not available in the current domestic programme.”

    Evelyn says the Tianjin experience has been “amazing”, providing her with plenty of ideas for her business project.

    “The forum really opened my eyes. I learnt so much about business solutions, creation, sustainability and innovation.”

    Jane says she has gained much from the cross-cultural aspects of the forum.

    “The workshop gave me valuable insights. It also helped me realise that New Zealand’s relatively small size doesn’t preclude it thinking big in terms of innovation entrepreneurship.

    “I came back to New Zealand having validated, through research, my concepts. I will now continue with my business, Eideann Chocolates, a souvenir gift chocolate which uses storytelling to convey a sense of place and people.”

    April says the experience has been “100 times better” than expected.

    “Just witnessing the differences in thinking that occurs between cultures was mind-blowing.

    “Here in New Zealand we only have 4 million people, whereas China has more than a billion, so the Chinese students’ concepts were much more global.”

    The Sino-New Zealand Modern Vocational Education Development Forum is a result of the Strategic Education Partnership between China and New Zealand, signed by then Prime Minister John Key in April 2013.

    Under the theme of “Innovation and Entrepreneurship”, the forum aims to stimulate discussion on research and policy between New Zealand and Chinese officials and institutions involved in vocational education and training.

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s international partnerships.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Malaysia, here he comes (Dec 13 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic student Oliver Johnston has won a Prime Minister’s Scholarship for Asia.

    The scholarship, worth almost $8000, will enable Oliver to travel to Malaysia in March. He will spend 18 weeks studying International Business at Taylor’s University, near Kuala Lumpur.

    Oliver, who has just completed the second year of a Bachelor of Applied Management at Otago Polytechnic, will study four papers at Taylor’s University. The credits he gains will go towards his final qualification.

    “Studying in Malaysia will give me a better understanding of the ethical issues and dilemmas affecting managers in international organisations.

    “It will help me gain a better understanding of management challenge's associated with developing strategies, designing organisations and managing operations of companies whose activities stretch across national boundaries.”

    Oliver sees long-term benefits, too.

    “It makes me more employable to larger businesses.

    “When I finish my Bachelor of Applied Management I hope to work in a global business.

    “The knowledge I gain while in Malaysia will give me a better understanding of international business. This includes analysing international business on a more strategic level, which I can apply to a New Zealand business setting.”

    Oliver also wants to use the opportunity to strengthen the ties between Otago Polytechnic and Taylor’s University.

    “I will encourage others in my degree to study abroad and expand their cultural knowledge while sharing mine.

    “I will also take advantage of all extra-curricular activities offered by Taylor’s University to expand my network and knowledge and help the students there learn more about New Zealand and its culture.”

    Oliver is one of 139 recipients in the latest round of Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Asia (totalling $1.3 million).

    Established in 2013, the scholarships have enabled more than 1200 New Zealand students to build new connections and networks, developing a deeper understanding of language and culture, and gaining an international perspective in their area of expertise.

    Read more about our Business programmes.

     

  • Study for free (Dec 12 2017)

    The introduction of the Government’s Fees Free tertiary policy in 2018 is an exciting prospect for students as well as Otago Polytechnic, says Chief Executive Phil Ker.

    “The policy provides an opportunity for those who previously might not have considered tertiary study because of the financial implications.

    Otago Polytechnic already caters to a diverse range of learners. However, the policy could very well widen – or deepen – the pool of potential learners and, especially, older learners. We particularly welcome that,” Phil says.

    The Government’s Fees Free policy covers one year’s full-time study, or part-time study up to $12,000 (or 120 credits) and has no age restrictions. This applies to all Otago Polytechnic programmes at Level 3 or above, including postgraduate qualifications.

    You can study for free* in your first year at Otago Polytechnic if you’re new to tertiary study or have not previously being enrolled in more than 60 credits at Level 3 or above on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework (NZQF).

    *Conditions apply.

    Read our guide for more information >

     

  • A special day (Dec 08 2017)

    Kerry Rushton has extra cause to celebrate graduation today.

    The 51-year-old Otago Polytechnic student will graduate with a Bachelor of Social Services and receive the Otago Daily Times Award for personal achievement in her studies.

    Kerry will mark the occasion at the Dunedin Town Hall with her mum, Beverley, who has a terminal illness.

    "I gave up work halfway through this year because Mum got a lot sicker and so I was trying to spend as much time with her as possible.

    "She has a heart and lung condition as well as type 1 diabetes. She went into full-time care last week because she needs 24-hour nursing now."

    Kerry was a full-time chef in Dunedin until four years ago, when she decided it was time to make a change.

    She completed a Certificate in Human Services, a stepping-stone to her studying for a Bachelor of Social Services, specialising in career counselling.

    She now plans to return to Otago Polytechnic and complete a Graduate Diploma in Social Services (Disability) then find work as a careers counsellor for people with disabilities or mental health issues.

    "A lot of people tend to forget that people with disabilities need jobs because otherwise they’re going to end up in a lot of poverty,” says Kerry, who was New Zealand First’s Dunedin South candidate in the recent election.

    Read more about our Social Services programmes.

  • Dinner raises extra $30,000 (Dec 07 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic’s Million Dollar Dinner has raised an additional $30,000 for local charities.

    Three hundred guests celebrated the milestone $1 million raised by the annual Charity House initiative. The event, held at The Hub on Saturday night, included a three-course meal, live entertainment and a charity auction.

    The proceeds from the night will go to the following organisations: 

    • United Way, which distributes donations to Otago community charities on Otago Polytechnic’s behalf
    • the Wildlife Hospital, which is due to open in Dunedin in January
    • scholarships for Otago Polytechnic students

    Each year for the past 11 years, Otago Polytechnic carpentry students have built a four-bedroom home with guidance from lecturers and the generous support of more than 20 local businesses. The finished Charity House is auctioned and all proceeds go to United Way, which distributes the funds to charities and worthy causes within Otago.  

    The 11th Otago Polytechnic Charity House sold on Saturday 18 November on campus for $270,000, a record price, outstripping last year’s previous record-beating price of $209,000.

  • City’s Arts and Culture Strategy - Creative Cities Southern Hui (Dec 05 2017)

    The Creative Cities Southern Hui ended on Saturday with a community meeting on the Dunedin City Council’s Ara Toi Otepoti, the city’s arts and culture strategy, at the Dunedin School of Art.

    The event featured a line-up of three-minute presentations on a host of arts projects the city has featured recently.

    Cr Hawkins said he thought the city was doing a better job in the arts area but if the public wanted more support for the arts, it needed to make that clear during the 10-year plan process in the next few months.

    Read more in the Otago Daily Times....

  • Opening date announced for Wildlife Hospital (Nov 28 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic and The Wildlife Hospital Trust are delighted to announce that the Wildlife Hospital in Dunedin has now received its permit from the Department of Conservation and will officially open its doors on Monday 15 January 2018.

    The Wildlife Hospital is a partnership between the Polytechnic and the Trust, and will be the only specialist wildlife hospital treating sick and injured native animals in the South Island. It will be based at the Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing and be capable of treating up to 500 animals per year when staffed at full capacity.

    “Work is already well underway to integrate the Hospital into the School of Veterinary Nursing, to maximise the exceptional learning and teaching opportunities it presents,” says the Polytechnic’s Director External Relations, Marketing and Communications, Mike Waddell. “As the only specialist wildlife hospital in the South Island, we are thrilled by the considerable benefits and advantages it offers our veterinary nursing students.”

    Andy Cunningham, the Co-Chair of the Wildlife Hospital Trust, is urging the community to get behind the initiative.

    “We are seeking sponsors and donors to ensure the ongoing success of this important facility,” he says. “It’s vital the Hospital is adequately funded so it can get on with treating our native wildlife, much of which is under serious threat.”

    People can contribute in several ways, including by purchasing fundraising T-shirts or donating directly. Details are available on the Hospital’s website. Corporate sponsors are also encouraged to contact the Trust through the website.

    The Hospital will be run by Dr Lisa Argilla, one of New Zealand’s best known wildlife veterinary surgeons, and accomplished wildlife veterinary nurse, Angelina Martelli. The pair will arrive in Dunedin early in the new year, ready for the Hospital’s opening.

     

    Check out the Wildlife Hospital's website and Facebook page.

    Read more about the Hospital in the Otago Daily Times.

    Find out more about studying Veterinary Nursing at Otago Polytechnic

     

  • Charity House sells for record price (Nov 28 2017)

    The 11th Otago Polytechnic Charity House was a four-bedroom house built by carpentry students with guidance from their lecturers, and fitted out with generous support from more than 20 local businesses.

    It sold on Saturday 18 November on campus for $270,000, which is a record price for the Charity House, outstripping last year’s previous record-beating price of $209,000.

    As a result, the Polytechnic has donated $100,000 to charity, via the local fundraising distributor United Way. Over the project’s life, we have donated more than $1 million in total to Otago charities and community groups.

     To celebrate the million-dollar milestone, we are hosting a Million Dollar Dinner on Saturday 2 December in The Hub on Forth Street. All proceeds from the evening will go to the Education Foundation for the purpose of supporting: 

    • Scholarships for students and staff
    • Development of learning facilities
    • Community projects: Dunedin Wildlife Hospital and via United Way.

    You can read more about the auction in the Otago Daily Times.

    Find out more about studying Construction at Otago Polytechnic. 

     

     

  • Current and ex-students feature in Portage Ceramic Awards 2017 (Nov 22 2017)

    Congratulations to the Portage Ceramic Awards winners for 2017. The annual awards and exhibition provide a vital platform to showcase the diversity of ceramic artists nationwide. The Premier Portage Ceramic Award carries a prize of $15,000. Up to three Merit Awards totaling $3000 are also on offer. This year’s prize selection also included a residency at Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research Centre in Denmark.

    A number of entrants with a current or past affiliation with the Dunedin School of Arts Ceramics Studio were selected as finalists including: Blue Black, Madeleine Child,Kate Fitzharris, Richard Stratton, Amanda Shanley, Bridgit Day, Michael Potter, Chris Weaver, Richard Stratton and Cheryl Lucas.

    The Premier Prize for was awarded to Richard Stratton for his work Forced Turned Teapot. The Premier Award was presented by this year’s judge Emma Budgen at a ceremony in West Auckland’s Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery.

    Amanda Shanley and Cheryl Lucas also received  Merit Awards for their works. Read more ...

    (image credit: Bridgit Day)

     



     

     

  • New Perspectives on Landscape (Nov 20 2017)

    The group exhibition New Perspectives on Landscape at the Ashburton Art Gallery encompasses a similar spirit and intention.  It presents the work of five recent MFA graduates from the Dunedin School of Art: Robyn Bardas, Miranda Joseph, Hannah Joynt, Sue Pearce and Fiona Van Oyen.  All are conscious of the politics and history of their subject and its increasing potential to contribute to debate about environmental, personal and political relationships with nature within the context of contemporary arts practice.

    "All the artists in this exhibition are answering the same question: 'when the landscape compels a response, how can we acknowledge the history of painting and art theory to provide critical integrity and validity to our response'," says Mandy Joseph.

    Read more.... Warren Feeney  looks into the legacy of traditional landscape paintings in this Press article. 

    New Perspectives is curated by Clive Humphreys.  It is a touring exhibition from the Dunedin School of Art featuring the work of Robyn Bardas, Miranda Joseph, Hannah Joynt, Sue Pearce and Fiona Van Oyen.

    New Perspectives on Landscape, Ashburton Art Gallery, 327 West Street, until January 14.

    (image Fiona van Oyen)

  • Students win chance to attend workshop in China (Nov 20 2017)

    Three Otago Polytechnic students have won the chance to participate in a start-up business model workshop in China.

    April Henderson, Jane Armour-Raudon and Evelyn Barbosa De Araaujo Tenorio will depart Dunedin on 25 November to attend the Sino-New Zealand Model Programme symposium in Tianjin, China. They will be accompanied by Otago Polytechnic's Director Internationalisation, Marc Doesburg.

    The three students will join a trio of Chinese students participating in the workshop, which is being held alongside the wider China-NZ Modern Vocational Education Development Forum, now in its fifth year. 

    As part of the application process, the students were required to propose a start-up business concept. One of these will be selected for further development during the workshop.

    April Henderson says she feels "incredibly lucky" to have been chosen to attend the workshop. "This is an excellent opportunity to gain business culture knowledge," she says. "I feel I have had little experience working with people from different countries so having the chance to immerse myself completely in a new culture is amazing".

    "The world is expanding rapidly and understanding other cultures is essential if you wish to succeed in today's world. I would love to report back my learning and experiences to my fellow students to help them on their way in the world."

     

     

     

     

  • Graduating Students Exhibition: SITE 2017 (Nov 16 2017)

    Students show their creativity at Dunedin School of Art's annual SITE exhibition.
    Read more in the Otago Daily Times....

  • High-ranking visit (Nov 16 2017)

    A high-ranking Chinese delegation, led by the Vice-Mayor of Shanghai, Mr Xu Kunlin, is visiting Otago Polytechnic.

    The visit reflects the deep, important and ongoing connections between Otago Polytechnic and Shanghai, and is part of the wider 23-year Sister City relationship between Dunedin and the Chinese metropolis, which is home to more than 24 million people.

    In addition to the civic delegation from Shanghai, students from the Shanghai University of International Business and Economics have also met Otago Polytechnic staff and students, as have students from the Shanghai University of Engineering Science's Fashion School, who will showcase garments as part of Otago Polytechnic’s School of Design (Fashion) Collections 17 event tonight.

    Read more about the Shanghai delegation's vist to Dunedin in the Otago Daily Times.

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s international partnerships.

     

  • Sweet plans (Nov 15 2017)

    Life is about to get even busier for Otago Polytechnic graduate Liz Rowe.

    A former Dunedin School of Art student who specialised in sculpture, Liz has turned her creativity to chocolate-making in recent years, establishing the Otago Chocolate Company (Ocho) in Dunedin.

    Based in Vogel Street, the company has just been bought out as part of Dunedin’s "Own the Factory'' PledgeMe campaign, which has raised $2 million -- in 32 hours! -- to expand operations.

    Liz has been appointed general manager of the company, and her first task will be ordering new equipment from Italy to enable an increase in production from 90kg of chocolate a week to a maximum of 200kg a day.

    Read more about Liz and her Otago Chocolate Company here.

  • Internship, China Cup prize to be presented (Nov 15 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic’s end-of-year fashion show, Collections 17, comes with a couple of stylish twists.

    The event, to be held at The Hub this Friday, 17 November,showcases an exciting range of designs by our third-year Bachelor of Design (Fashion) students, as well as stand-out looks created by students in their first two years of study and our Graduate Diploma in Design students.

    In addition, Design students from the Shanghai University of Engineering Science/IFA Paris will showcase their collections on Friday night, as part of the Shanghai Dunedin Sister City Fashion Communication Project.  

    The Shanghai delegation includes notable international fashion event organiser Madame Zhou, who will present Otago Polytechnic fashion design graduate Ariane Bray with her 2nd place prize in the recent China Cup -- a result based around Ariane’ honours fashion collection developed in 2016.

    One hard-working year-3 or year-4 student will also receive a WORLD fashion internship, to be announced at the end of the Collections show by New Zealand fashion leader Denise L’Estrange-Corbet.

    The eight-week WORLD internship includes a stipend of $5000 (before tax) from the Newmarket Business Association and is scheduled to commence in late January 2018 or as negotiated.

    Collections 17 will be held at The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, on Friday 17 November, 7pm  (doors open), seated by 7.45pm for an 8pm start.

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic's Design programmes.

     

  • Christmas spirit (Nov 09 2017)

    Otag Polytechnic first-year midwifery student Rosie Naylor makes Christmas hampers and gives them to Women's Refuge. And she pays for all this out of her own back pocket.

    Read more in the Otago Daily Times

  • Student Village attracts interest aplenty (Nov 08 2017)

    From the curious to the committed, more than 170 visitors enjoyed a tour of Otago Polytechnic’s Student Village at the weekend.

     “We had a mixture of prospective students and their families, and members of the public who were just curious to take a look around,” Dr Emilie Crossley, Liaison Advisor, Learner Services, says.

    “Visitors commented that the rooms were really spacious, the building had great character with the exposed timber, and about how convenient its location was being so close to campus."

    Max Sims, Community Manager, Otago Polytechnic Student Village, enjoyed the chance to meet residents (and their parents) from near and far, including from Timaru, Alexandra and Manawatu.

    “All of the residents expressed that they were really excited by how it was looking and couldn’t wait to get into it and meet everybody at OPSV.”

    The brand-new, on-campus Student Village will be open to students for the first time in 2018.

    Just a short walk from campus and the city centre, the purpose-built 231-bed furnished residential village offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, the Student Village uses sustainable materials throughout, including the timber within its unique structural frame. 

    Read more about the Student Village here >

     

  • Form and function (Nov 02 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Jessie Wong continues to grab the spotlight.

    Jessie has recently returned to her Wellington workshop having spent a couple of weeks in Europe, where she showed her 2018 Yu Mei bag collection at Paris Fashion Week, as well as attending a Milan trade show.

    Jessie (24), who began making bags in her first year of Fashion Design, continued to explore the idea and arrived at the concept for her latest range while in her final year in 2014.

    Aided by an AMP scholarship, she launched Yu Mei (her middle name) in 2015, promptly building on that impetus by showing at New Zealand Fashion Week the same year.

    Fast-forward a couple of years: Jessie now employs 16 staff in her Wellington workroom, where her range of handbags and totes are crafted to fulfil two key philosophies – they need to be both functional and good looking.

    Jessie’s Yu Mei bags are sold in more than 30 Australian stores, as well as a range of New Zealand retailers, including Ballantynes (Christchurch), Harper Inc (Hamilton) and Good as Gold and Ena (Wellington and Auckland).

    For more on Jessie Wong's latest adventures, read Stuff's feature article.

  • On the rise (Nov 01 2017)

    There's a sprinkling of Otago Polytechnic within the pages of a new recipe book.

    Mark Cross trained as a chef at Otago Polytechnic, then spent years overseas before returning to Dunedin where, eventually, he set up his dessert and pastry business, The Tart Tin.

    Mark is a regular at the Otago Farmers' Market where, on Saturday mornings, he sells (and sells out) his sweet delights from a caravan named Minty.

    Such has been his popularity, publisher Potton & Burton commissioned Mark to write a book, The Tart Tin, in which he has devulged many of his secrets.

    Mark's editorial adventures have been augmented by the vibrant images of Dunedin-based Isabella Harrex, a former Otago Polytechnic photographer and Dunedin School of Art graduate whose work is featured in Cuisine, North & South, Dish and Next magazines, among others.

    Read the Otago Daily Times feature.

    Read more about our Hospitality, Cookery and Culinary Arts programmes.

  • Taste of Southern hospitality (Oct 30 2017)

    Thailand teenagers Boonyawee Pakvisal and Parima Na Pompetch have been enjoying a hearty taste of Otago Polytechnic’s top-notch tertiary programmes.

    Our strong international connections extend to Education New Zealand’s partnership with Srinakharinwirot University Prasarnmitr Demonstration (SUPD) School in Bangkok, one outcome of which is the New Zealand Young Genius Chef Culinary Competition.

    The cooking contest, which targets high school students studying Home Economics or Hospitality, aims to raise the profile of New Zealand education as well as provide a platform for direct engagement with school-aged students.

    And this is where Boonyawee (nickname, Lookchan) and Parima (Prim) enter the mix.

    Having won the Bangkok-based competition, the pair received a prize package that included a one-week study visit to Dunedin and Central Otago earlier this month.

    They have enjoyed our famous Southern hospitality: from a tour of Otago Polytechnic’s Food Design facilities, to hospitality classes at our Cromwell Campus, savouring fare at a range of cafes and restaurants through the region, to crossing Lake Wakatipu on the SS Earnslaw.

    Lookchan (16), who has enjoyed cooking since she was a young child, entered Junior MasterChef Thailand when she “I was around 11 to 12 years old” and reached the final six, a result which has fuelled her passion for food.

    “I am interested in a culinary and business degree and for my future career I would like to do something that is involved with food and cooking,” Lookchan explains.

    Prim (17), too, plans to enrol in a culinary programme and become a chef. “But if I can’t go for this programme, I plan to study arts and music and focus on cooking as a hobby instead.”

    For more information on Otago Polytechnic’s range of food and hospitality programmes, visit:

    https://www.op.ac.nz/study/hospitality/#Cookery-and-Culinary-Arts

  • Bold strokes for Central Otago (Oct 25 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art will offer its year-2 Painting and Digital Photography courses in Central Otago (Cromwell and Wanaka) from 2018.

    Otago Polytechnic also plans to seek approval to offer the Year 3 Painting and Digital Photography courses, from its Bachelor of Visual Arts programme, in Central from 2019.

    Clive Humphreys, Acting Head of Dunedin School of Art, says that as Central Otago’s population grows, it seems sensible to be serving this region.

    “We have seen increased interest particularly in our post-graduate programmes, which have attracted a range of artists from Central Otago.

    “We have started by offering programmes in painting or photography, two disciplines in which a lot of people in Central Otago are working.

    “This isn’t for first-year arts students. We are looking to cater to those people who already have some form of arts practice. They might have a studio of their own, have exhibition experience, and be looking to lift their skills and techniques in specific areas.”

    Those seeking to enter the year-two programme will be required to supply a portfolio that demonstrates their experience.

    Support for students will include visits to the Cromwell Campus by members of the faculty, and some student visits to the Dunedin School of Art. Other support will include phone or Skype arrangements.

    “I see this as the first stage of the establishment of a greater Dunedin School of art presence in Central Otago,” Clive says.

    Art graduates are increasingly finding employment in a variety of sectors, including as a practising artist, curator, art educator or researcher – or in the digital and film industries.

    You can read more about the programme here.

     

  • New student accommodation for Central Campus (Oct 06 2017)

    The first steps of turning Cromwell's Central Campus into a student village has begun.

    Read more

     

  • Taking the local road (Sep 04 2017)

    Kayla Green has created a career pathway that has been surprising even to herself! Kayla was a student at Cromwell College, and her interest in Home Economics and desserts led her to take up the opportunity to join the Otago Central Tertiary College for her last two years of school. During this time she not only completed years 12 and 13 she also successfully completed the National Certificate in Cookery, Level 2 and 3.

    After finishing year 13 Kayla enrolled for the New Zealand Certificate in Cookery (L4) and is thoroughly enjoying her full time study experience, “The classes are small enough that you get to know the other students well, and you get lots of hands on experience and one on one time with the lecturers.”

    Kayla has not only achieved more than many in the last few years, but she also won Silver at the national Toque D’or competition for her restaurant service.  “Studying at Central has opened so many doors for me and has given me the most amazing experiences. I am also lucky that I can still live at home and stay in this amazing region. I’m definitely going to stay on and do the Level 5 Diploma in cookery next year, who knows where it will take me.”

  • Three Dunedin artists in finals for prestigious national Art Awards. (Sep 01 2017)

    Three Dunedin School of Art graduates, artists Sam Foley, Justin Spiers and Alex Lovel-Smith, have made the finals of the prestigious national Wallace Art Awards.

    The nine Wallace awards, worth more than $275,000, including five international art residencies, monetary prizes and stipends, are given for contemporary New Zealand painting, sculpture, video, drawing and unique photography and print. The Paramount winner is awarded a six month Residency in New York with the International Studio and Curatorial Program; the Wallace Arts Trust Development Award winner receives a residency at Vermont Studio Centre, while the Kaipara Foundation Wallace Award winner receives a residency at the Altes Spital in Solothurn, Switzerland. The winner of the Fulbright Wallace Arts Trust Award receives a three month residency at the Headlands Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Many of the winners and finalists of the Awards are added to the Collection each year.  Read more  about the Awards.

    Foley won the award's Kaipara Trust Award, its second-highest honour, in 2013. It included a four-month artist residency at the Altes Spital Cultural Centre in Solothurn, Switzerland. Lovell-Smith has entered the awards for the first time with a work which came from his Master of Fine Art research at the Dunedin School of Art. Justin Spiers. also a graduate of the Dunedin School of Art, has had artist residencies in Beijing, Darwin, Sydney and Brisbane and has been a previous Wallace Award finalist.

    Congralations to all the finalists - for a full list of finalists see here.

    Read more in the Otago Daily Times ...

  • Central Campus Newsletter (Jul 17 2017)

    / Feature of the month - July 2017 /

    Find out what's happening at Central Campus in our newsletter.

     

    Study Carpentry in 2018 

    Otago Polytechnic is answering the call for qualified builders in Central Otago by offering a new qualification for 2018. The New Zealand Certificate in Construction Trade Skills (Level 3) (Carpentry) gives students the ready skills to enter the construction trades as an apprentice carpenter.

     

    New outdoor pursuits programme at Central!  

    Central Otago is about to become the outdoor wonderland for a host of tertiary students chasing their education dreams. As of Feb 2018, Otago Polytechnic will offer the Certificate in Outdoor Pursuits (Level 4) at its Central Campus.

    READ MORE>

  • Top Hospitality Students Line Up for Live Kitchen Battle (Jul 04 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic Central Otago Campus has confirmed some of its top hospitality students will participate in this year’s national culinary competition which determines the country’s emerging culinary and restaurant service superstars.

    Putting it all on the line at the annual Nestlé Toque d’Or competition will be 30 students from the country’s leading training institutes.

    NZChefs National President and organiser of the event, Graham Hawkes, said the students have all signed up for what will be a gruelling training schedule in the run up to the big event.

    “Many of the students will spend months training for the big day, while also juggling work and study commitments.

    Nestlé Toque d’Or, which has been running for over 26 years, is considered by those in the industry to be the premier student culinary and front of house competition in New Zealand.

    “Hotly contended, the goal is to create and deliver an award-winning menu to special guests attending the event on competition day,” Graham said.

    “Last year, a team from the Universal College of Learning in Palmerston North took out the top title. They won’t be returning to defend the title this year so it is destined to be claimed by another region that is determined to make its mark in the culinary stakes.”

     The 10 institutes competing this year are:

    • ARA Institute of Canterbury - Timaru
    • AUT University
    • Eastern Institute of Technology
    • North Shore International Academy
    • New Zealand Defence Force
    • Otago Polytechnic Central Otago Campus
    • Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology, Tauranga Campus
    • Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology, Rotorua Campus
    • Wellington Institute of Technology
    • Wintec

    Each of the institutes select a team comprising three of their top students – two culinary and one restaurant service. Competitors converge in Auckland during July to compete against one another in a simulated live kitchen environment.

    “Tensions are high and the pressure is on throughout to get it right and avoid any costly mistakes that could lead to lost points. The menus the students create and deliver to guests on the day must be as close to perfect as possible, if they want to be named the winning team.”

    Further adding to the pressure is the fact that their menus and service must be completed within a set timeframe. All of this done under the constant gaze of onlookers watching the event, as well as a panel of top local and international industry judges who mark their every move against a tough World Chef’s judging criteria.

    “If they want to get it right on the day, it takes nerves of steel and everyone in the team working together as a tight unit.”

    All of the teams are given in advance a list of ingredients that they can use to create menus that they think will impress the judges. Included in this year’s line-up of ingredients are: Nestlé Professional products, fresh and seasonal New Zealand grown vegetables, New Zealand lamb and Akaroa Salmon.

    “Aside from the highly competitive aspect, the event also opens doors to new career opportunities with influential culinary professionals scouting the event for fresh talent.”

    Nestlé Toque d’Or will be held on Thursday 27 July at the Auckland Showgrounds.An awards dinner will be held later in the evening at the Heritage Hotel where the winning team will be announced. Sponsors are: Nestlé Professional, Beef + Lamb New Zealand, vegetables.co.nz, Akaroa Salmon, House of Knives and Moffat.

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic's Central Cookery Programme.

  • Otago Polytechnic welcomes 2017 Otago Secondary Tertiary Students (Feb 14 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic’s Central and Dunedin campuses are welcoming over 120 new students to the Otago Secondary Tertiary College. 

    Previously known as the Trades Academy in Central Otago, the Otago Secondary Tertiary College (OSTC) is a training college which gives secondary school students a head start to achieving career-based qualifications while working towards their NCEA at school.

    This year Central campus is welcoming students from Wakatipu High, Mount Aspiring College, Cromwell College, Dunstan High and Roxburgh Area School.  The students are offered subjects including Level 3 Cookery, Hospitality, Automotive and Carpentry studies.

    For more information on the Otago Secondary Tertiary College visit: https://central.op.ac.nz/trades-academy/otago-secondary-tertiary-college/