Otago Polytechnic

Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar

Term ONE 2020
THURSDAYS, 12.00 – 1.00 PM,
P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

 

In light of the announcement of COVID-19 now being present in Dunedin, the Research Seminar Programme which runs on Thursday lunchtimes during the semester is postponed until further notice.

 

THURS 27 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Material Fabulations

Nicolas Cheng and Beatrice Brovia

 

Conversation Piece, a collaborative practice initiated in 2011 by Beatrice Brovia and Nicolas Cheng, is a hands-on study on interconnectedness and interdependency: a reflection on making together with/through conversation, misunderstanding and friction, and a dialogic space where the notion of self-reliance is challenged. This talk will focus on questions and ideas that have become central to our collaborative practice. From the notion of anthropogenic sublime, to understanding complex material flows and how an extractive logic has profoundly shaped our world, the talk is an ongoing reflection on the intimate, enfolding boundaries that connect materials, objects and people.

Beatrice Brovia (IT/SE) and Nicolas Cheng (HK/SE) are jewellery artists, researchers and cross-disciplinary makers based in Stockholm, Sweden. Beatrice received a BSc in Interior Architecture from Politecnico di Milano, and a MFA in Jewellery and Corpus from Konstfack in 2009; since 2013 she has been working as lecturer with focus on jewellery at Ädellab, Konstfack, where she currently is serving as head of the Bachelor Program. Nicolas graduated with a BA from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 2006, and shortly after he was artist in residence at Fabrica Research Centre of Benetton Group in Treviso, Italy. In 2010, he earned his MFA in Jewellery and Corpus from Konstfack. In 2019, he obtained his PhD from the University of Gothenburg.

 

 

THURS 5 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Symbol and instrument : Making ethics in the age of data.

Roderick Bamford

 

How do we validate ‘making ethics’ in a time of digital mediation? What are the truths of data? Rod Bamford’s talk responds to these questions through personal research narratives, framed by the idea of ‘ecologies of production’. These hybrid practice scenarios, in addition to expressing individual ideas, are concerned with a broader agency, addressing contemporary matters through a work’s symbolic and instrumental potential.

The examples illustrate particular challenges relevant to contemporary practice under 3 loose headings : craft and the ethics of authorship, interaction, and interference, and foreground a discussion of the potential of hermeneutical aesthetics to critique ethical value in practices that engage individuals and community through instrumental and symbolic considerations. Projects include the Digital Bamboo collaboration in Indonesia, Trans-dimensional Printing for Sonic Loop and the Norman Lindsay vase restoration, 3d clay printing for GL21 Japanese recycled ceramics, and UK research extending the capacity and potential of digitally Printed Ceramic Surface.

 

Rod Bamford is an artist and educator working at the intersections of art, craft and design, with a particular ceramics focus. Since studying at Sydney’s National Art School, his practice has developed through exhibitions, residencies, commercial design and academic projects. Rod's work is widely represented in major collections. He has held roles heading departments at the National Art School and as director of Cone Nine Design studios before joining UNSW Art & Design in 2016, where he began researching the impacts of emerging digital strategies for production and sustainability, developed the Post Graduate Future Making course stream, and taught courses across those interests. In 2017 Rod held a 12 month post heading the Ceramics and Glass Programme at the Royal College of Art in London, where he continued to teach and research digital making strategies and their effect on ‘artefactual’ dialogues, the psychosocial connections we have with material objects. He has most recently been working at the School of Art & Design at the Australian National University, Canberra, leading the Ceramics Workshop.

 

THURS 12 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

A Brief History of Fire

Emma Smith

 

Broadly speaking Emma Smith's work negotiates the post industrial militarization of culture, the looming certainty of the mechanised accident, notions of displacement, reparation and debt, institutional restructures and failures in the (predominantly) painted form. In collaboration with William Bardebes animated worlds of late capitalist industrial redundancy and dispossession are mapped. Smith's writing negotiates the thorny situation of the individual (and the artist) in these precarious states.

Emma Smith was born in Auckland, New Zealand in 1975. Smith has an MFA from Elam University of Auckland, 2005. She has exhibited in extensively in New Zealand and in London. Smith is currently Contemporary Arts Discipline Lead and Senior Lecturer at Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland.

 

 

THURS 19 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Sonic Recipes from a Public Kitchen

Juliana España Keller

 

Juliana creates sonic performance field work through a Public Kitchen. A Public Kitchen is formed by recreating the private and domestic space of a kitchen to a public space. The kitchen table is a platform for exploring variations in sound behaviour of experimental noise from kitchen tools as the motherboard. She seeks to reposition the kitchen tool by exploring its displacement and functionality using electronic and manual manipulation with music hardware to investigate the movement and sensory behaviour of sonic power by dismantling the tools of the modernized kitchen inventory. Juliana seeks to negotiate a woman’s place in art institutions and to value a woman’s place in society inclusive of trans women, genderqueer women, and nonbinary people in this discourse. Her research is linked to how geographic places are experienced, emphasizing a feminist materialist politic of connection in a posthuman world.

 

Dr. Juliana España Keller takes a lead in producing multi/trans/interdisciplinary works to a listening public addressing all bodies as forms of noise and disruption in the way in which language and communication is made noisy. Her critical writing has been published in the Journal of Feminist New Materialisms, Switzerland, and her “Public Kitchen” works have been exhibited in exhibition spaces across the globe and in public venues in Melbourne and Hobart. She completed her practice led PhD doctoral research at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne in October 2019.

 

 

THURS 26 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Meaningful wandering

Renee Ugazio

 

This lecture will introduce Renée Ugazio’s practice led research as she navigates the potentials and perils of mobilising jewellery practice. Jewellery is often thought of as a practice fixed to a specific location - the jeweller’s bench, relegated to the studio. In this lecture Renée will discuss how through exploring jewellery beyond the bench and off the body the hidden potential of practice might be revealed.

 

Renée Ugazio is a Melbourne based visual artist and scholar who works between craft and spatial practice. Renée’s inter- disciplinary research is conducted across craft history, art and architectural theory. This manifests in practice through a redefinition of jewellery as a set of actions, intentions and traces freed from the manufacture of objects. By doing this Renée’s practice is reimagined and deployed into alternate sites and situations to explore temporality, experience and material engagement. Renée’s interests lie in how the actions and traces of her craft ‘out of context’ might generate a renewed and attentive experience of place. To amplify this Renée’s work exploits techniques from jewellery, photography, print, performance and broader spatial practices.

Renée has participated in numerous exhibitions in artist-run spaces, commercial galleries and public venues across Australia. She has also exhibited internationally in America, Europe, and Taiwan. However, Renée also exploits opportunities to undertake unauthorised projects in public space all over the world. Renée Ugazio hold a PhD from RMIT University and is currently a lecturer at RMIT University and the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne.

 

 

THURS 2 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Observations from a Distance

Karin Johansson

 

The main focus of my seminar will be on my own artistic work and its development, preferably last year's projects and issues. If possible I would also like to include experience and impressions from my residency time in Dunedin.

 

Curiosity as a driving force, and the power of imagination. Abstractions of places and memories.

In a constant dialogue with ideas, body and materials. To let go, follow and trust.

See limitations as an asset, not an obstacle. Follow gravity, look for balance.

Observe rather than analyze.

On a journey, in the middle of something.

 

Karin Johansson, born 1964, lives and works in Gothenburg. She attended HDK Academy of Design and Crafts at the University of Gothenburg, where she earned her MFA degree in 1994. Her work has been exhibited in solo shows in many international galleries and locations, such as Ornamentum Gallery (Hudson/NY), Galerie Marzee (Nijmegen), Hannah Gallery (Barcelona), OONA Galerie (Berlin) and Atelier Lachaert d`Hanis (Tielrode), and has also participated in numerous group shows. Her work is features in several private and public collections. She is the recipient of a number of major grants and awards, among them the five-year working grant of the Swedish Arts Grants Committee, which she has received twice. She is one of the founding members of Hnoss Gallery/Initiative in Gothenburg, and was between 2007-2019 Professor of Jewellery Art at HDK Academy of Design and Crafts at Gothenburg University.

 

 

THURS 9 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

Migrant Objects, Material Intelligences and Conditions of Space

Michael Greaves

 

The space that painting composes is both a space available for tangible looking and a projection of space that is emerging. It is a kind of space somewhat arranged outside of our conditions of meaning. Taken in isolation, the painted mark relates more to an abstract letterform, occurring on a plane and of that plane simultaneously. During 2019, I worked with an Iranian calligrapher on a project that considered the ways in which the space around calligraphy and its context is essential to the way in which the text is received. This contextual arrangement also occurs frequently in painting, and it is the confluence of these ideas that has become interesting to me in thinking about the nature of painting, and its operations. Beginning from a doodle on a yellow gumboot, my seminar will traverse some of the making questions that have occupied my thoughts in the making of the work associated with the publication from this collaboration, as well as the ways in which this work has now positioned me in thinking about the validity of making paintings that sidestep direct meaning in today’s saturated and didactic image world.

 

Michael Greaves is a Senior Lecturer in Painting at the Dunedin School of Art. Born in Dunedin he holds an MFA (with distinction) in Painting from the DSA (2017), and a BA in Art History & Theory from the University of Otago. He has a growing exhibition record with work included in two recent shows in Berlin. His research and art are driven by the seemingly contradictory worlds of the maker, the object and the thing. His paintings combine the visual fact and the imaginary proposal of painting in a way that identifies a slippage in our visual sensations.


Published on 17 Feb 2020

Orderdate: 17 Feb 2020
Expiry: 27 Apr 2020