Otago Polytechnic

Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminars Term 1, 2021

 

THURS 4 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Matt Ellwood

The research versus the encounter

Utilising his own work spanning more than 20 years, Matt Ellwood will discuss how encounters and research can serve very different purposes when building an art practice across academic, public and commercial contexts.

Matt Ellwood was born in Wellington (1973) and currently lives in Auckland where he is Head of the Fine Arts School at Whitecliffe. He is represented by Melanie Roger Gallery. Ellwood’s work utilises appropriation-based strategies predominantly manifested through representational charcoal drawing and highly crafted, handmade sculptures. His practice deliberately conflates together contexts that formally resonate but also create nonsensical readings that challenge and disrupt the visual and textual systems of advertising meta-systems.

He graduated with a first class honours MFA from Elam in 2003 where he received the Vice Chancellor’s scholarship and was included in the Govett Brewster’s review of contemporary New Zealand art in the same year. Ellwood has received other prestigious awards for his works including the Wallace Arts Trust Development prize in 2004 and the Kaipara Foundation Wallace Arts Trust Award in 2011. These included artist residencies at the ISCP in New York and the ASCC in Solothurn, Switzerland respectively. He has been a regular exhibitor in curated exhibitions, selected art events and awards such as the Headlands Sculpture on the Gulf, Te Tuhi drawing wall and billboard projects, the annual Wallace Art awards, Parkin Drawing Prize and National Contemporary Art Awards. Recent solo exhibitions include: Autumn Collection (Melanie Roger Gallery, Auckland), Smoking Tom Ford (GSCA, Sydney), Taste the Good Times (Wallace Arts Centre, Auckland), and Frieze Saint Laurent (Melanie Roger Gallery, Auckland).

                                                                                                                                                    

 

THURS 11 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Tim Croucher

Somewhere Around Here

In this seminar I will talk about a recent body of work part of which was shown at RAMP Gallery in Hamilton in 2019 under the title Somewhere Around Here. Emil McAvoy wrote about the exhibition: “…Tim Croucher's portrayals of the Waikato delicately balance affection and irony, depicting pastoral scenes and provincial situations which mingle recollections, historical events, tender encounters and furtive activities. Somewhere Around Here features Croucher's recent landscape paintings based on scenes observed from the water during trips along the Waikato River between Kirikiriroa (Hamilton) and Taupiri, alongside motorbike trips in the Waikato region and from drives to Auckland and across to Thames. This local scenery is both amplified and distorted through gestural paint application and an often non-naturalistic colour palette. Disquieting occurrences are sometimes inserted to upset these images' potential for idyllic representation.”

Tim Croucher has been living in Hamilton for almost 30 years and making and exhibiting paintings from there. He has been involved in a committee that instigates, curates and funds large public sculpture projects, in the development of an annual Street Art Festival, he’s looked at zillions of NCEA level 3 and Scholarship Painting folios, had some exhibitions in NZ and China in collaboration with artists from there, and taught Painting, Drawing and Installation at undergraduate and postgraduate levels since late last century at Waikato Institute of Technology.

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THURS 18 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

Sandra Heffernan

A Sense of Place

Heffernan’s work captures spaces that become symbolised in ecological colour and materials; whether dye applied to fabric, or natural pigments from bacteria, or in materials solving waste problems.  In this lecture the introduction reveals the influences informing the works. Two distinct strands exist: textile design led research in exploration with industry and science, and inquiry related to material culture. 

Two key projects provide overviews of textile design works and collaborative projects: Sunplumwineberry, a light emitting carpet; and Through the Globe, an original design created during an Artist in Residency in Portugal, then exhibited during Contextile.  Published papers, for example, Sunplumwineberry, Novel Natural Colorants; Here and There Now, evidence the material culture aspects of the works.

The second strand of research is Material culture, and includes a commissioned book chapter Lost in the History of Modernism, that reveals modernist embroidery design contributions responding to intense political activity, and attempts to address the gender gap in history. In conclusion new works including Violet-bleu, colour created from bacteria will be discussed.

Dr Sandra Heffernan is an international textile designer exhibiting sustainable colour and material works, bio- textiles, and author of numerous papers. This design research contributes to global and national forums, including Commonwealth Secretariat Natural Fibre Forum, International Wool Textile Organisation, and Textile Exchange. Sandra adopts novel approaches in collaborations, blurring the boundaries between design, science and technology. Additionally, systematic theoretical investigation informs practice-led responses to industry challenges. Her design works were exhibited at the Biennale d'Art Contemporain Sacré, Menton, France (2019); Contextile, Guimarães, Portugal (2016); Borders International Art Show, Venice (2016); and in 2020 she received an Originality Award from the Museo Pérez Enciso Textile Ethnographic Museum Museo, Spain.

                                                                                                                                                     
 

THURS 25 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Ed Hanfling

The “ethical turn” in contemporary art as research.

Over the last few decades, artists working and studying within academic institutions have gradually gained acknowledgement that making art counts as research. Convincing the wider academic community of the merits of practice-based research has meant demonstrating the application of rigorous research methods and systems. But artist-academics still tend to baulk at the process of submitting their research projects to the scrutiny of institutional ethics committees, a routine process in other research disciplines. There are reasons for this reluctance – including the belief that the artist’s role is to challenge social mores and take risks rather than to be conformist and careful – but also a sense in which it is in tension with a conspicuous tendency in the wider field of contemporary art, the very “industry” from which the standards upheld by art schools are derived. Call it the “ethical turn”, away from the “shock tactics” of twentieth century avant-gardes, to an ethos of care; away from individualism and irresponsibility, to a more community-minded engagement with diverse social and cultural values. What relationships or overlaps can be drawn between the ethics of the academy and the ethics of the art world? How might artist-academics respond to the ethical guidelines and structures of their research-based institutions?

Ed Hanfling is a lecturer in art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art. He is a regular contributor to the quarterly journal Art New Zealand, has published books on New Zealand artists such as Roy Good, Milan Mrkusich, Ian Scott and Mervyn Williams, and is co-author of the book 250 Years of New Zealand Painting (to be published by Bateman later this year). Ed heroically serves as the DSA’s representative on the Otago Polytechnic Research Ethics Committee (OPREC).

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THURS 1 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Mark Baskett

On the echinate question of what might be meant by the term ‛research’ when evaluating and discussing visual art.

From the making of art that favours imaginative exposition and the exploration of certain internal states of mind— to long hours spent in archives, or wandering work-specific sites, or simply trawling for facts and fragments online: ideas around the place and potential role of research in my artistic practice have changed significantly over the last twenty years. And even today, when hearing the word ‛research’ attached to examples of creative visual art, I am often left wondering about what, more precisely, might be meant by the use of this term. Does it point to a clearly outlined framework and methodology with distinct and communicable results? Is doctoral research in the area of visual arts now a new gold standard by which we might measure the value and seriousness of work made today? Though I cannot provide definitive answers to such questions, I am fascinated by what might be meant or indeed not meant when the term research is applied to visual art. In this seminar I will thematise these concerns by putting forward a selection of my own artistic work and reflecting on the presence and the changing use of the term research both in around the context of the work.

Mark Baskett is a practicing visual artist, born in Dunedin, New Zealand. His tertiary education began with a BFA at what was then titled “The Quay School of Arts”, in Whanganui, New Zealand. From 2005-2007 he completed

an MFA after studying at the Bauhaus Universität, in Weimar and the Üniversität der Kunst (UdK) in Berlin. From 2007-2015 he lived in Zürich, where he exhibited regularly and participated in a variety of artist residencies; both

in Switzerland and in Germany. His work has also been shown in Belgium, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. Currently he is employed part time as a teacher in the Arts and Media Department at the Nelson Polytechnic (NMIT).

                                                                                                                                                     
  

THURS 8 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Bridie Lonie

The Anthropocene

The Anthropocene is a term currently used to characterize the ways that our current world, and our view of it , is changing, for the human, the more-than human, the sentient and the non-sentient alike. The term uses a Greek word for human, and this has led to many challenges and the framing of alternatives terms that include causes (The Capitalocene, The Plantationocene, signifying slavery), and consequences: the Necrocene, for example, signifying the extinctions that are currently occurring. There are many other terms .The seminar considers the issue of naming as a political strategy and the implications for such down-stream results as audiences and funding. The role art plays as a container, a vehicle for meaning, feeling and sensation in this new. complex period is central to the seminar.

Bridie Lonie, BFA, PhD (Closer relations: art, climate change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene, Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, 2018). Bridie Lonie has worked in art education since the 1980s.

She was a founding member of the Women’s Gallery in Wellington (1980-84), an editor with Marian Evans and Tilly Lloyd of A Women’s Picture Book, 25 Women Artists of Aotearoa/New Zealand) Spiral/the Government Printer, Wellington 1988 and co-published with Marilynn Webb “Marilynn Webb, Prints and Pastels”, Otago University Press , 2003. She has written for Art New Zealand and the Listener. 

                                                                                                                                                    


THURS 15 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN   

Dr. Caro McCaw Art

Design and education through social practice 

In this seminar Caro will walk through her practice as it has evolved over the last 30 years, starting at the Dunedin School of Art. From print publications, to empty shops and species ambassadors her practice focuses more on enabling relationships than leaving physical marks or objects. Current projects include the Dunedin Dream Brokerage and co-ordinating Otago Polytechnic’s DESIS lab.

Caro McCaw investigates how we come to understand our landscapes, local knowledge, and regional cultures and contexts through collaborative creative practice. She asks how we may work around colonial ways of seeing to visualize and understand our shared histories and sites more socially. Caro is an Associate Professor and Academic Leader in Communication Design at Otago Polytechnic. She is involved in a wide range of local community and regional development projects often working with collaborative student-staff teams, and local community groups, including museums. Caro is a member of the AKO Academy of Tertiary Teaching Excellence and in 2016-17 was a Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at SUNY Canton, in Upstate New York. She is the co-ordinator of DESIS Otago.

                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                    MID SEMESTER BREAK


Published on 1 Mar 2021

Orderdate: 1 Mar 2021
Expiry: 1 Mar 2023