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Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar Programme Semester 2, 2021


THURS 22 JULY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

 Lesley Brook
How artworks emotionally engage: 19 influential factors

In 2020 the Dunedin School of Art held the exhibition The Complete Entanglement of Everything. Lesley Brook interviewed 25 participants about their emotional responses to the artworks in this exhibition. In this presentation Lesley will report some of the findings from this research, which she has undertaken for her Master of Professional Practice degree. In describing their strongest emotional responses to the artworks, participants also articulated why they had these emotional responses. Analysis of transcriptions of these interviews reveals the factors that influenced them in forming those emotions. The 19 factors identified relate to the individual viewer, or to the artwork being viewed, or are independent of both viewer and artwork.

Lesley Brook is the Research Projects Coordinator in the Directorate of Research and Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. Her research interests are in the impact of research beyond the academic community.


THURS 29 JULY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Alistair Fox
A "Sacral Vision": The Influence of Renaissance Painters on the Film Aesthetic of Pier Paolo Pasolini

Since the earliest days of cinema, a symbiotic relationship has existed between painting and fiction films, given that both depend upon similar expressive procedures: the creation of a visual image within a frame, selection and composition of objects included, and the generation of a perspective for the viewer. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that a reciprocal exchange between the two media has always existed, usually taking one or both of two forms: citation and stylistic imitation.

This seminar will explore how these two types of pictural imitation are exploited in the films of Pier Paolo Pasolini, one of the most admired masters of twentieth-century cinema – a filmmaker, poet, and intellectual who was also a student of art history as well as a painter in his own right. The presentation will demonstrate how Pasolini, who had a particular predilection for the artists of the Italian Renaissance, deployed citation for satirical purposes in the service of a radical socio-political agenda, and how he used stylistic imitation to convey a sense of the sacredness of a primitive human reality that he opposed to the vulgarity and complacency of the contemporary bourgeoisie.

Using illustrations and film clips, the discussion will examine Accattone, Mamma Roma, La Ricotta, The Gospel According to Matthew, and The Decameron, showing the influence of painters that include Caravaggio, Jacopo da Pontormo, Rosso Fiorentino, Masaccio, Giotto, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Goya, with the aim of demonstrating the commonality of the aesthetic principles that inform both media, and also the ongoing usefulness of paintings as a source of inspiration for the mise-en-scène of filmmakers.


THURS 5 AUGUST, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Miranda Bellamy & Amanda Fauteux

Artists Miranda Bellamy & Amanda Fauteux will share about their practice and their two recent exhibitions, A Wardian Case at RM Gallery in Tāmaki Makaurau and radiata at Blue Oyster Art Project Space in Ōtepoti.

Miranda Bellamy and Amanda Fauteux are partners and artistic collaborators who extend the stories of wild plants through site-specific research and experimentation. Working through ideas of reciprocity, animacy, and the personhood of non-humans is central to their practice. By listening to plants and responding through interdisciplinary projects, they queer the constructs that separate human beings from non-human beings and make space for the critical revision of human histories.

Bellamy holds a BFA from the Dunedin School of Art and Fauteux holds an MFA from Concordia University in Montréal. Since their collaborative practice began in 2019, they have attended artist residencies in New York and Vermont, USA, and have exhibited their work in Aotearoa, Canada, and the USA. In June 2020 they were digital artists-in-residence with Artspace Aotearoa. They live in Ōtepoti.

www.mirandabellamy.com, @_miranda_was_here www.amandafauteux.com, @amanda.fauteux


THURS 12 AUGUST, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Amanda Watson

Painting with places and people: Exploring the idea of working collaboratively to see places in unexpected ways

Paintings and other symbolised image systems contribute to the way we see and understand the world, however accurate or flawed they may be. I am interested in how to make paintings that allow environments to be creative protagonists rather than passive objects of representation. My painting practice involves engaging with geographical places by wrapping surfaces of the land found there, and as a result the canvas records my encounters with it over time and reveals exchanges between myself as an artist and the outside and studio environments in the context of “new-materialist” theory. The paintings yield a dense and complex view of place and make manifest the relationships between process, gesture, environments, and myself, and in this way reveal experience of place in unexpected ways. In this presentation I will share my current thoughts about how this idea can be extended to a collaborative approach in the making process of paintings by including bystanders, locals, and friends, and how that might affect the recording of encounters of place and our understandings of it.

Amanda Watson is a visual artist, researcher and educator who is curious about the world we live in and how we communicate about places and geographies. She was awarded a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland, where she majored in painting, a Postgraduate Diploma in Museum Studies from Massey University, and a Master of Arts with Distinction in Painting from Waikato Institute of Technology. Her work has been exhibited and shared through exhibitions, awards, editorials and published reviews in New Zealand and overseas and accessioned into public and private collections.


THURS 19 AUGUST, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Lucy Hammonds

Joanna Paul – The all-purpose room

This seminar expands on an essay in the forthcoming publication Joanna Paul – Imagined in the context of a room (published August 2021), reflecting on the impact that male-centric perspectives have had on the shape of art history in Aotearoa. Using the career and context of Joanna Paul as a focus, this discussion will consider what our art history might look like if we work to re-centre artists who have previously inhabited the margins.

Lucy Hammonds is a curator and writer based in Ōtepoti Dunedin. Presently working as a curator at Dunedin Public Art Gallery, her research interests span contemporary and historic art, craft and design. Recent projects include Joanna Paul – Imagined in the context of a Room (August 2021), Ralph Hotere: Ātete (To Resist) (2020-21) and New Networks: Contemporary Chinese Art (2018-19).


THURS 26AUGUST, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Jenna Packer

Utopiaroa

I am looking at the active relationship between ideas and practice in my most recent body of work, “Utopiaroa”. My painting over the last few years has been concerned with tracing aspects of social and political thought; the Enlightenment, redemption myths, neo-liberalism and populism have been central. I’m interested in using metaphors to examine political and cultural hegemony and to try to understand some of the constructs we are living with and under. In my recent work I’ve started examining the arrival in Aotearoa of modernist, capitalist land use ideas and their legacy in relation to current ecological and psychological crises. During my residency at the DSA I’ve been revisiting this work and paying attention to the provisional states that are normally lost during my painting process. Trying out transparency copying, printing, photo-etching, experimenting with mirror-image and a reduced palette, I have also been trying to resolve some of the questions arising from using colonial art-historical sources; referencing work that we are so familiar with, but creating a critical distance from it.
I’m interested in how layers of historical source material can be peeled apart and examined for traces of the author's Intentions, selections or exclusions. When I’m working, the relationship between critical thinking and making is also layered; slowing down and pulling apart the process and the images and then trying to re-configure them is where I’m at currently.

Jenna Packer is a practicing visual artist and lives at Waitati. She graduated from Ilam School of Art in 1988 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and went on to complete a Bachelor of Arts in History with First-Class Honours at the University of Canterbury the following year. Through the 1990s Jenna spent time at the Glasgow Print Workshop, The Slade School of Art (London) and La Rouelle Studio (France), and has been exhibiting work since 1990 both within New Zealand and abroad.


THURS 2 SEPTEMBER, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Cecilia Novero

To Look at Art with a Dog's Nose or Learning to Smell in the company of Ghosts...

Through three distinct art installations that include olfaction as one of their aesthetic tools, I take to task some of the most common analyses of the recurrence of smell in contemporary art. Namely, I argue that if art's focus on smell may be meant to enhance and revive a sense of place, as Ursula Heise put it, this deliberate revamping is problematic. First I maintain that narratives of emplacement risk informing nostalgic curatorial projects, or fetishising one sense versus another. More conceptually, such revivals invoke notions of "immediacy" and "presence," as part and parcel of "emplacement" (e.g., expressed through words such as "belonging”). Against such pitfalls, the art projects this paper considers emphasize the "material spectrality" and uncanny (unhomely) inhabitation of historical time. Rather than confirming one's presence in the present, or conjuring the past in the present as presence, the installations under scrutiny here exacerbate the always already mediated materiality of smells' passing or invisibility. While still engaging individual memories, Teresa Margolles's Vaporization, Korpys/Löffler and Schmal’s Geist and Jenny Gillam’s Frank emphasize the encounter with the past as a temporal and spatial instance of disorientation, occurring in a present that, as a consequence, is found never to be present to itself, to be homogenous. An effect of this art may be, then, that smells jolt one's sense of self-presentness and, indeed, identity, precipitating the perception that self and world are bound together in multidimensional, plural processes of co- becoming that include non-human-animals.

Cecilia Novero has a PhD in German Studies from the University of Chicago (USA). After positions held at the University of Michigan, Vassar College and Penn State University (UP), she joined the University of Otago (NZ) in Cecilia's research and teaching interests are the interdisciplinary fields of Food Studies, Animal Studies and the Environmental Humanities. She pursues these interests by focusing on Visual Culture, mostly 20th and 21st- century European cinema and the art and texts produced by the historical Avant-garde and the Neo-Avant-garde movements. In her scholarship Cecilia has also explored the material role that nature and non-human animals play in literary and philosophical texts, in particular post-humanism. She examines all texts, whether art, film or literature, comparatively and cross-culturally. Cecilia has an abiding interest in the literature and art from the former German Democratic Republic, travel literature, adaptation theory, gender and queer theory, as well as critical theory – especially but not limited to the works of Walter Benjamin, Herbert Marcuse and Theodor W. Adorno.


THURS 9 SEPTEMBER, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Mark Stocker

Virgin in a Condom: Te Papa’s baptism by fire

The assemblage by British artist Tania Kovats, Virgin in a Condom, created probably New Zealand’s greatest ever art controversy in 1998. This came about through its exhibition in the British Council sponsored Pictura Britannica, which opened at Te Papa just 15 days after the museum itself. For many people who had welcomed Te Papa as “our place”, the sense of betrayal was considerable. Prominent art world figures, however, rallied behind the chief executive, Cheryll Sotheran, and her decision not to withdraw the exhibit. This paper relates to Mark Stocker’s publication of an exhaustive 25,000 word article on the theme in Tuhinga, Te Papa’s refereed journal, and draws on the hundreds of letters written by members of the public to the museum, lodged in its corporate records. Other primary material, together with interviews with two key Te Papa players at the time, Ian Wedde and the late Sue Superville, also shape Mark’s account.

Dr Mark Stocker is a semi-retired art historian, who taught at the universities of Canterbury and Otago before moving to Te Papa where he spent five years as curator of Historical International Art. He has been sole editor of the last four issues of Tuhinga, and his recent books include the edited New Zealand Art at Te Papa (2018) and the imminent When Britain Went Decimal: The Coinage of 1971. He lives in Christchurch.


THURS 16 SEPTEMBER, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Ed Ritchie and Megan Brady

Gown Seminar

Ed Ritchie and Megan Brady both studied under the broad umbrella of the DSA sculpture department and will talk through their practices since leaving Dunedin School of Art in 2017. They have exhibited both individually and collaboratively across Aotearoa. Their practices intersect and cross over themes of collaboration, friendship, architectural nuances, public space and security.

Megan Brady is a multidisciplinary artist based in Ōtepoti, Dunedin. Graduating in 2017, she holds a Bachelor of Visual Arts (First Class Honours) from the Dunedin School of Art, and shortly after exhibited her first solo show “A quiet corner where we can talk” (2018) at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery. Recent shows include “Dead Reckoning” (The Physics Room, Christchurch, 2019), “we painted the walls with cracks” (Play_station, Wellington, 2020), “The florist sent the flowers was pleased” (Favour, Dunedin, 2020) and “Lay in measures” (Enjoy, Wellington, 2021). Within the creative community of Ōtepoti she is a board member of the Blue Oyster Arts Trust and facilitates creative practices at Studio2/Margaret Freeman Gallery, a small, all-inclusive art studio for local artists with disabilities.

Based in Ōtepoti, Ed Ritchie has a predominantly object-focused practice, working with a range of found materials, often responding to architectural attributes of given space or echoing familiar mechanisms in their assemblage. Ed completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Hons) in 2017 through the Dunedin School of Art and has since become a founder and co-facilitator of ARI Favour. Recent exhibitions include: “Central heating” (Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Ōtepoti, 2021); “Lay in Measures” (Enjoy, Wellington, 2021), “Hush Swarms, Hot lunch”

(Ōtautahi Christchurch, 2020), “Console Whispers” (Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Ōtepoti, 2019).


THURS 23 SEPTEMBER, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Scott Eady and Graham Fletcher

A Tale of Two Residencies

In this seminar, Dunedin School of Art lecturers Scott Eady and Graham Fletcher will report on residencies undertaken in Ōtepoti Dunedin and Whanganui respectively.

Scott will share some of the processes behind three projects undertaken as Dunedin Public Art Gallery’s 2020 Ōtepoti Dunedin artist in residence. He says: “Routine and the mundane may provide comfort and structure but can also reveal opportunities for new knowledge. Making things as an artist, as a person, and as a citizen in a place where the history is, is crucial.” In his work to date, Graham, as a New Zealand born Samoan, has explored complex cultural issues within a post-colonial context. He was the recipient of the Tylee Cottage residency (Feb–June 2021) and will discuss research and work undertaken throughout the residency, which will be exhibited at the Sarjeant Gallery in August 2022.

Scott Eady is a senior lecturer at the Dunedin School of Art. In his art practice, he seeks to push past “what is” to prompt a consideration of “what could be”. His 2019 exhibition “Images of Love” highlighted his interest in reimagining everyday objects and things – an action echoed in the benches of his Dunedin Public Art Gallery project Cinelli 250. A graduate of University of Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Art (MFA, 1999), Eady’s work is held in major collections such as Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, The Hocken Collection Uare Taoka o Hākena and The Chartwell Trust. He has exhibited artwork extensively both nationally and internationally, including at the Gwangju Biennale (2012) and Venice Biennale (2013).

Graham Fletcher has been a practicing artist since 1997, and has exhibited in numerous shows including: Biennale d’art contemporain de Nouméa, Tjibaou, Cultural Centre, New Caledonia (2000); “IKI and Thanks for All the IKA”, Contemporary Art Centre, Lithuania (2003); 10th Festival of Pacific Arts, American Samoa (2008); “ATA: An Exhibition of Contemporary Samoan Art”, Harris Gallery – University of La Verne, California (2012); “Home AKL”, Auckland Art Gallery (2012); The Seventh Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery – Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia (2012); “Future Primitive”, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, Australia (2013); and “Time of Others”, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2015), travelling to The National Museum of Art, Osaka (2015), Singapore Art Museum (2015–2016) and the Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2016). More recently, a retrospective of Fletcher's work entitled “The Third Space: Ambiguity in the Art of Graham Fletcher” (2018) was exhibited at the Gus Fisher Gallery in Auckland and curated by Linda Tyler and Hannah Burgoyne.


THURS 30 SEPTEMBER, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN  

Vicki Lenihan

Local stories, local artists: Cultural cringe or celebrating who we are, where we are

With borders closed, in an increasingly competitive domestic tourism market, Ōtepoti Dunedin’s ability to draw visitors is being tested. While we can proudly claim to have the populist soundtrack to our lives sorted, we are surrounded by images created by internationals who often stay only long enough to install. This is the time for us to champion the importance of upholding and developing our own histories and visual identity, to grow our visible expressions of pride in what’s special about us, and reap the wellbeing and possibly financial benefits of carving out our own contemporary story.

Vicki Lenihan (Waitaha, Kāti Māmoe, Ngāi Tahu) is a multimedia artist whose practice centres on sustainability, celebrating identity interwoven with our unique and irreplaceable environment, and highlighting issues connected to self-determination and hauora. She is also a writer; an educator; a museum professional; a regular broadcaster; an arts producer; secretary of the Paemanu Ngāi Tahu Contemporary Visual Arts Charitable Trust, and Community Events Advisor – Cultural at the Dunedin City Council.


 


Published on 20 Jul 2021

Orderdate: 20 Jul 2021
Expiry: 20 Jul 2023