Search the Otago Polytechnic website

Exploring barriers and motivators to exercise for people with pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes

Mackenzie Armfield
13 August 2021


Armfield, M. (2021). Exploring barriers and motivators to exercise for people with pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. (A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the Master of Applied Science at Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand) [PDF 1.134 MB]

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand and acknowledge the barriers and motivators to exercise for people diagnosed with pre-diabetes (PD) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and whether these were influenced by stigma associated with diagnosis. Five
participants from a diabetes exercise programme were observed in the programme and interviewed. Based on interview data three composite case studies were developed to highlight some of the participants unique responses and experiences with activity barriers and motivators. The main motivators explored were social aspects of exercise, a desire to improve health and fitness, enjoyment, and good weather. The main barriers experienced included cost, injury, lack of time, and lack of enjoyment. Social stigma associated with diabetes appeared to have an impact on some participants. Feeling embarrassed exercising in public decreased motivation to engage in physical activity (PA), whereas the desire to manage their condition or prevent further comorbidities was a great motivator for exercise. Overall, most of the barriers and motivators to exercise for people with PD or T2DM were consistent with those described in the literature, but participants offered some unique perspectives when discussing their barriers and motivators. The stigma associated with diabetes can negatively and positively impact motivation to exercise.

Mackenzie Armfield's primary supervisor was Phil Handcock.

Key words: barriers, motivators, exercise, pre-diabetes, Type 2 diabetes.

License

This thesis is available under a Creative Commons licence CC BY-NC-ND 4.0.

Creative Commons License