Otago Polytechnic

Archive for 2019

Events

  • Midwifery Information Sessions: North Island (May 22 2019)

    Attain a unique and internationally-renowned Bachelor of Midwifery qualification which leads to registration as a midwife in New Zealand.

    Gain a solid theoretical education and significant midwifery practice in a range of settings whilst studying via blended learning
    with compulsory block courses in our satellite areas. 

    If you are interested in finding out more, come along to one of our information sessions.

    Wellington
    24 June, 6-7pm, WRH4 Seminar Room, Wellington Hospital, Riddiford Street, Newtown

    Palmerston North
    25 June, 6-7pm, Room 1.1.25, UCOL Palmerston North, Corner of King and Princess Streets

    Porirua
    29 June, 4-5pm, Kenepuru Hospital, Conference Room,16 Hospital Drive, Porirua

    Lower Hutt
    4 July, 6-7pm, Education Room, Te Awakairangi Birthing Centre, 2 Connolly Street, Melling, Lower Hutt

     

    Explore more about Midwifery >

  • Foundation Learning Information Session - Wednesday 26 June, 12.00pm-1.00pm (May 1 2019)

    You may have worked in different jobs, taken a break to raise a family or be looking for a second chance at academic success.

    Our practical, hands-on programmes can help improve your English, numeracy, computer, study and employment skills – along with a wide range of electives that will help you pursue a career in a number of key industries.

    We also offer a range of bridging programmes that staircase into our diploma and degree programmes.

    Our information session will be held at our Dunedin Campus at Lower Forth Street (beside the Mobil petrol station). 

    Find out more about our Foundation Learning and Bridging Options.

  • Career Guidance and Study Ready - Tues 11 June, 3.30pm-6.30pm (May 1 2019)

    Do you want help exploring your career options?

    No matter what stage you’re at or what career or study pathway you want to follow – we can help you!

    We understand starting tertiary study and/or a new career can be daunting. That’s why we have our experienced Career Practitioners on hand to help you explore your options at our Career and Study Ready event.

    We’ll help you find a career that fits your values, goals and interests – and discuss your career options and/or a possible course of study.

    The day includes:

    • Career Guidance – Get advice on your career pathway from our experienced team.
    • Student Support – Talk to our team about the learning support services we offer.
    • Campus Tours – Explore our facilities if you are not familiar with our campus.
    • Foundation Learning – Talk to our team about our range of programmes that can help you staircase into tertiary study or seek employment.
    • Student Loans and Allowances – StudyLink will be available to help guide you through applying for a loan/allowance.

    Whether you want to explore your career options or you are looking to enrol in a programme of study – everyone is welcome! 

    Location: Otago Polytechnic, The Hub - Forth Street, Dunedin

    Find out more about our Career Guidance support services here.

  • Vocational Education Reform Consultation event with Minister Chris Hipkins (March 4 2019)

    Tuesday 5 March

    5.00pm - 7.00pm 

    The Hub, Dunedin Campus

    Otago Polytechnic warmly invites you to attend this Government consultation event which will be attended by Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins.   

    This session is an important opportunity for the public, local Iwi, councils and communities to engage in the consultation process and provide clear feedback to the Government. We urge you to help us defend the regional responsiveness of Otago Polytechnic, which is a local treasure and New Zealand's leading ITP.  

     

    The proposal 
    • Create a New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology, merging 16 public Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) into a single entity. 
    • The proposed model disestablishes Otago Polytechnic as a regionally responsive institution and will see all important decisions about vocational education in Otago made by a head office somewhere else in New Zealand. 
    Otago Polytechnic's response 
    • We believe this lack of independence compromises our ability to respond quickly to Otago training needs and will constrain the innovation for which we are renowned.
    • The proposal if implemented as is also seriously undermines the professionalism of teaching as we know it.
    • We are not opposed to most of the Minister’s proposals, which signal well overdue change for vocational education in New Zealand.
    • Indeed, two of the Minister’s proposals are to be applauded – i.e. a fit-for-purpose funding system and the establishment of a more seamless training system that integrates learning in work with learning in institutions.
    • The transfer of all industry training to polytechnics also makes sense, and will benefit learners with a simpler system and the high-quality learner support which underpins polytechnic provision. 
    • However, the particular proposal to establish a single institution would:
      • relegate Otago Polytechnic to a branch of the parent institution
      • remove our operational decision-making
      • constrain significantly our ability to be innovative and responsive to our region. 
    • However, the Minister’s proposal can be redeemed through a model which combines the best of a centralised approach with well-funded, regionally responsive institutions.  
    What you can do
    • Otago Polytechnic is a strong, stable, flexible, innovative and – significantly – growing organisation that brings significant economic and social benefits to Otago. Please help us to persuade Minister Hipkins to adopt an alternative proposal which allows us to continue doing what we have proven over the last decade we do extremely well. 
    • The consultation period lasts until 27 March and we encourage all of our partners, stakeholders and community to have their say.
  • Praxis '19 (December 4 2019)

    You're invited to attend our 2019 Professional Practice Symposium - online, in Auckland or in Dunedin.

    WHEN: 9:15 AM to 5:00 PM, Wednesday 11 December 2019
    WHERE: The Hub on our Dunedin campus, or Level 4 Boardroom Auckland campus
    COST: free

    REGISTRATION:

    Come and hear a range of speakers present their research. Click here for the Praxis '19 symposium programme.

  • 2019 Publications Launch (November 29 2019)

    This year we celebrate publication of eight issues of our journal Scope: Contemporary Research Topics and one issue of Junctures: The Journal for Thematic Dialogue

    WHEN: 5pm, Wednesday 11 December 2019
    WHERE: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin
    RSVP: This event is free but registration of attendance is required

    This is an opportunity for us all to come together as a research community and celebrate together. For catering purposes, we ask that you please let us know if you are coming to this event and tell us of any dietary requirements.

    We hope you can join us and look forward to seeing you there.

    Prof Leoni Schmidt
    Director: Research & Postgraduate

  • Drawing in the Gallery (November 29 2019)

    This free session is led by Anita De Soto, a Dunedin School of Art lecturer.

    WHEN: 12:30 to 1:30pm, 18 December 2019
    WHERE: Dunedin Public Art Gallery
    COST: Free
    HOW: Bookings required as this session is limited to 20 persons. Phone Lynda (03) 474 3249


    Image: FRANCES HODGKINS Stormy Sunset over Peaslake, Surrey 1930. Pencil on paper. Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago

  • Come and support two our Bachelor of Occupational Therapy Students! (November 6 2019)

    Nau mai, haere mai!

    If you're looking for something to do this Sunday, come and support two of our Bachelor of Occupational Therapy students, completing their final year project.

    Jocelyn Helm (pictured above with my daughter Mila) and Ruby Dunbar are organising an Obstacle Course Adventure Race.

    This is an awareness event for Conductive Education Otago. My daughter goes to Conductive Education Otago every Saturday morning for therapy and has made amazing progress in learning to walk. Jocelyn has worked as a carer support person for Mila for the last year. This has been great work experience for her, as she is completing her studies.

    Come along and support Jocelyn and Ruby and cheer for the many teams (including our family!) as we make our way through the obstacle course.

    This week is Conductive Education NZ Awareness Week, please see their website for more details about Conductive Education Otago and how it's helping children and adults with disabilites in Otago.

     

    Obstacle Course Adventure Race

     

  • Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminar (November 11 2019)

    This month's two speakers are Jean Patterson and Sally Baddock.

    WHEN: 1pm, Monday 11 November 2019
    WHERE: click here to participate online

     

    Jean Patterson, Assoc Prof School of Midwifery

    Title: Place, serendipity and research

    This presentation looks at anchoring me within place, an early experience with birth, and the impetus for research in rural midwifery. I conclude with some lessons I have learned from my own study, writing and research.

    Bio: Jean is an Associate Professor in the School of Midwifery. She teaches in the postgraduate programmes and supervises thesis students. Her previous midwifery practice experience has been in largely rural areas and her research interest is in the sustainability of a viable rural birth option. In particular, Jean's PhD study explored the challenges of managing the distance from specialist care when transfer was needed. Jean's PhD and Master's degree (with Distinction) are from Victoria University Wellington. She is a subeditor on the board of the New Zealand College of Midwives' journal and also reviews submissions to other midwifery journals. She is also a member of the Otago Polytechnic Ethics Committee and manages the Category B ethics processes for the School. Jean has been involved in School research projects aimed at evaluating the blended satellite midwifery programme which began in 2009. These projects have included a 3 year graduand cohort study, the experiences of Maori and Pacifica students in the programme and an alumni study. Her role also includes mentoring research active staff and students and she has a broad experience in qualitative research methodologies, surveys, and post-modern and critical methodologies.  

     

    Sally Baddock, Professor - School of Midwifery

    Title: Feedback from Sleep Down Under 2019 Conference.

    This presentation will briefly share five papers focussed on various aspects of infants sleep published in 2019 ie car seats and SUDI, smoking and SUDI, a novel strategy for infant calming, and the relationship between infant sleep and toddler BMI. These papers were presented as part of the Paediatric year in review at the Australasian conference in Sydney in October.

    Bio: Sally is Professor in the School of Midwifery. She has been an educator for over 30 years teaching bioscience and supervising master’s level research. She has a strong research interest in the physiology of infant sleep. Her external collaborations have led to Health Research Council funding in this area, and her team has published widely on infant-adult bedsharing and SUDI.

     

  • Career and Study Ready (November 5 2019)

    Do you want help exploring your career options?

    No matter what stage you’re at or what career or study pathway you want to follow – we can help you!

     

    Date: Tuesday 3 December

    Time: 10.00am to 1.00pm

    Venue: The Hub, F Block, Forth Street

     

    We understand starting tertiary study and/or a new career can be daunting. That’s why we have our experienced Career Practitioners on hand to help you explore your options at our Career and Study Ready event.

    We’ll help you find a career that fits your values, goals and interests – and discuss your career options and/or a possible course of study.The event includes:

    • Career Guidance – Get advice on your career pathway from our experienced team.
    • Student Support – Talk to our team about the learning support services we offer.
    • Campus Tours – Explore our facilities if you are not familiar with our campus.
    • Foundation Learning – Talk to our team about our range of programmes that can help you staircase into tertiary study or seek employment.
    • Student Loans and Allowances – StudyLink will be available to help guide you through applying for a loan/allowance.                 
    • Further Study - If you've studied before, talk to us about your further study options.

    Whether you want to explore your career options or you are looking to enrol in a programme of study – everyone is welcome! Find our more about our Career Guidance support services here.

  • Plant Sale and Open Day \ Horticulture & Arboriculture (October 30 2019)

    Come along to our plant sale and meet our Horticulture and Arboriculture students.

    We have a range of ornamental plants and edible plants for sale, all grown by the students. Bring the kids along for the tree climbing event and take a tour of the permaculture garden.

     

    Saturday 30 November

    9. 30am –1.30pm

    L Block, 100 Anzac Avenue

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • detail (October 30 2019)

    Behold the innovative concepts and work of our Architectural Studies graduates in this exhibition of plans, models and highlights from 2019.

    22-27 November
    O Block – 115 Anzac Avenue

     

    OPENING
    Friday 22 November at 6.00pm –8.00pm

    SHOWCASE

    Saturday 23 November, 10.00am – 4.00pm

    CLOSED: Sunday 24 November

    Monday 25 November, 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    Tuesday 26 November, 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    Wednesday 27 November, 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    LATE NIGHT: Thursday 28 November, 12.00pm – 8.00pm

     

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • DEBRIEF (October 30 2019)

    Treat your senses at this vibrant Design showcase, featuring surprising, clever and insightful objects and creations from Communication Design, Fashion Design and Product Design.

     

    21 – 24 November

    The Hub, Forth Street

    OPENING: Thursday 21 November, 5.30pm

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • IT Showcase (October 30 2019)

    Come and see the computer games, mobile apps, posters and Internet of Things devices that our Information Technology students have developed as industry projects with businesses and community organisations.

    Tour the IT certificates and BIT Capstone project displays in rooms D202 through to D206.

     

    OPENING – Friday 22 November

    5.00pm–8.00pm (for a 5:30pm start)

    D201, Second Floor, D Block, Harbour Terrace

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • Charity House Auction (October 30 2019)

    For the 12th year running, our Carpentry students have built a house to auction for charity, with generous support from local companies. Funds raised go to United Way, which distributes the proceeds to charities throughout Otago.

     

    Auction
    Saturday 23 November
    12.00pm
    L Block, 100 Anzac Avenue

     

    Open Homes

    Thursday 24 October, 5.00-5.30pm

    Sunday 27 October, 2.00-2.30pm

    Thursday 30 October, 5.00-5.30pm

    Sunday 3 November, 2.00-2.30pm

    Thursday 7 November, 5.00-5.30pm

    Sunday 10 November, 2.00-2.30pm

    Thursday 14 November, 5.00-5.30pm

    Sunday 17 November, 2.00-2.30pm

    Thursday 21 November, 5.00-5.30pm

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • Engineering Technology Showcase (October 30 2019)

    Our Engineering Technology students have spent this year coming up with solutions to engineering problems. Come and see them present the results of their capstone projects.

     

    1 Nov, 8 Nov, 15 Nov
    8am-12.30pm,
    L Block, Room L134, 100 Anzac Avenue

     

    Engineering  projects v2

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • Photographic Media Art Exhibition (October 30 2019)

    Experience the best of the year’s work in this striking and thought-provoking exhibition from our talented Photographic Media Art students from Dunedin School of Art.

    1 - 7 November
    The Hub, Forth Street

    OPENING
    Friday 1 November, 5.30pm

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • Lifestyle changes for chronic disease treatment (October 29 2019)

    You are welcome at a presentation by a visiting international scholar Dr Adrienne Schäfer.

    WHEN: 12 noon to 1pm, Thursday 31 October 2019
    WHERE: D101, D Block, Otago Polytechnic, Harbour Terrace, Dunedin

    The Role of Personalised Interventions for Sustainable Lifestyle Changes in the Health Ecosystem: A Transdisciplinary Approach for the Treatment of Chronic Diseases

    Diabetes and other lifestyle related chronic diseases are on the rise. A large body of medical studies confirms that sustainable lifestyle changes can prevent their onset. In previous research, a number of specific interventions have been identified as effective. However, interventions are largely standardised and do not take sufficient account of the motivational and psychological factors of individuals. Furthermore, the network of service providers in the health ecosystem is rarely intertwined so that interventions are not coordinated with each other. Therefore, lifestyle change programs often lack patient focus, efficiency and sustainability.

    Based on a transdisciplinary approach, the research project connects scientific evidence from health psychology with service design and a service-ecosystem perspective, aiming at identifying combined, personalised interventions for enabling sustainable behaviour change. By interconnecting the stakeholders in the health ecosystem, interfaces are optimized in the sense of a patient-centered perspective.

    Adrienne Schäfer graduated in Economics and Social Sciences and holds a PhD from the University of Augsburg, Germany. After finishing her studies, she worked in several positions for Daimler (car manufacturer) in Germany, the US and was later responsible for Aftersales Marketing of DaimlerChrysler in Switzerland. In 2004 she joined the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts – School of Business. Adrienne Schäfer is head of the Competence Center Service and Operations Management. She is a lecturer in marketing, services marketing, strategic management and innovation management on the bachelor and master level and in different postgraduate programs. Service Innovation and Service Design are her fields of research activity.

     

  • NZ Occupational Therapy Week (October 18 2019)

    Prof Mary Butler and Otago Polytechnic Occupational Therapy students are joining forces with VICTA, the Visual Impairment Charitable Trust Aotearoa, to mark NZ Occupational Therapy Week 21 - 25 October with two special public events to benefit the community.

    VICTA meeting with a presentation by Prof Butler of tips and tricks for living with visual impairment.

    WHEN: 1.30 to 2.30pm, Wednesday 23 October
    WHERE: Dunedin Public Library

    Free vision screening and collecting stories of when people got their first pair of glasses

    WHEN: 10am to 3pm, Friday 25 October
    WHERE: Centre City New World

    Please recommend these events to friends and family.

  • Symposium: A better world through open education (October 16 2019)

    Join our two-day inaugural open education symposium hosted by OP and New Zealand’s Centre for Open Education
    Practice (COEP). Free to all Otago Polytechnic staff and students.

    5 & 6 December 2019, Sargood Centre, Otago Polytechnic.

    The theme is ‘social justice through open education’ and includes:

    ● Making education more sustainable using Open Educational Resources

    ● Leading change towards more open education

    ● and Open Educational Practices.

    Programme includes keynotes, presentations, workshops and panel discussions. 

    Keynotes:

    Dr. David Porter (a Virtual Presentation), is the Chief Executive of eCampusOntario, Canada, and a long-time advocate for the benefits of adapting new technology to deliver educational opportunities, and been involved in open and distance learning since the 1990s.

    Dr. Cheryl Brown is Associate Professor in e-learning in the School of Educational Studies and Leadership at the University of Canterbury and co-Director of the e-learning Lab. In recent years, she is focusing on the development of digital literacy practices and the role of digital devices in student learning. Cheryl is an active collaborator in the national research project on textbook affordability.

    Register Now

     

     

    Image Credit: Ricardo Lima

  • SIT/OP symposium (October 10 2019)

    Hear an exciting range of research presentations at this year's annual joint symposium for staff of Southern Institute of Technology and Otago Polytechnic.

    WHEN: 9:00am to 5:00pm, Monday 4 November 2019
    WHERE: Sargood Centre, Logan Park Drive, Dunedin
    RSVP: for catering purposes please let us know if you intend to join us for all or part of the day

    Come and support your colleagues and hear about initiatives from across Otago Polytechnic and at SIT.

     

    9:10am

    Welcome from Prof Leoni Schmidt

    9:15am

    Session 1, 15 min presentations, chair: Émilie Crossley

    Johanna Rhodes

    SIT

    Using escape rooms to promote learning through teamwork and problem solving

    Murray Strathearn

    SIT

    An evolving IPE narrative

    Donna Burkett, Rebecca McDiarmid

    OP

    Navigating and nurturing the student nurse journey

    Debbie Ruwhiu

    SIT

    Hoake - Let’s do this! Raising Māori students’ achievement in a mainstream tertiary organisation through culturally responsive practices

    10:30am

    Session 2, 15 min presentations, chair: Joy Gasson

    Elise Allen

    OP

    Printing it out: improving the UX of marking using new and emerging technology

    Robyn Hill,

    Robert Horrocks

    SIT

    Evaluating facilitators’ use of Blackboard ‘discussion boards’ for formative / summative assessment, and to enhance online learning engagement

    Barnaby Pace

    OP/SIT

    Alice, Bob and the Cat in a Box: Examination of Quantum Mechanics Frauchiger Renner Paradox

    11:30am

    Session 3, 5 min presentations, chair: Sally Bodkin-Allen

    Michael Fallu

    SIT

    The Leisure and Recreation for People with Disabilities in Southland, Ten years on (a longitudinal study)

    Emma Cathcart

    SIT

    QUEENS GO SOUTH - A real-world collaboration project with CHROMA

    Kingsley Melhuish

    SIT

    Pūmoana and Pedal Steel – the natural combination

    Yvonne Mosley-Martin, Sally Baddock, Emma Bilous, Deb Beatson

    OP

    Taking education to the people not people to the education: a New Zealand case study in delivering education “closer to home”

    Joelle Peters,

    Hana Cadzow

    OP

    Where are the women? - Exploring enrolments in Level 6 and 7 engineering programmes

    12:00

    Lunch

    1:00pm

    Session 4, 15 min presentations, chair: John Mumford

    Bridget Kerkin, Susan Lennox, Jean Patterson

    OP

    Midwifery documentation: What is its purpose?

    Naveed ur Rehman

    SIT

    Solar Potential Assessment of Public Bus Routes: A case study in Invercargill

    Matt King, Charlotte Flaherty, Jing Lin

    OP

    Physical Design Parameters for Handheld Dynamometers

    2:00pm

    Session 5, 15 min presentations, chair: Jo Rhodes

    Samuel Mann

    OP

    Double, double, toil and trouble; Inside the professional practice research bubble

    Megan Walker
    OP

    Capturing insights from women about health complications in pregnancy: The introduction of visual and/or vocal segments into midwifery education in response to a photograph

    John Mumford

    SIT

    Postgraduate international students’ academic writing barriers

    3:00pm

    Session 6, 5 min presentations, chair: Jenny Aimers

    Steve Ellwood

    OP

    Discovering personal motivation through new learning

    Nayani Landage

    OP

    Recognizing Collaborative Approach to Teaching Construction Projects Estimating over the Conventional Methods of Teaching

    Joy Gasson, Adon Moskal, Dale Parsons

    OP

    The 'Art' of Programming

    Tania Allan-Ross

    OP

    Sensory Solutions within Tertiary Institutes

    Krissi Wood, Dale Parsons

    OP

    Student Affect in CS1: Insights from an Easy Data Collection Tool

    3:30pm

    Afternoon tea

    3:50pm

    Session 7, 15 min presentations, chair: Kingsley Melhuish

    Carlo Gabriel

    SIT

    Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Learning Engineering Fundamentals

    Debbie Watson

    SIT

    A study to identify the Emotional Intelligence among NZ Diploma in Enrolled Nursing students

    Émilie Crossley

    OP

    Qualitative longitudinal research: negotiating ethics through time

    4:45pm

    Close and awards

  • Project-based Learning with Communities (October 8 2019)

    This all day workshop is an opportunity to share and develop your experience using project-based learning with communities (PBLC) in your teaching practice.

    WHEN: Friday 1 Nov 2019, 10am to 4pm
    WHERE: G203, G Block, Otago Polytechnic, Union Street East, Dunedin
    RSVP: by Thursday 31 October to Caro McCaw

    Otago Polytechnic is committed to supporting community organisations and not for profit groups in the region. The institution sees this not just as a way to give something back to the community, but as an important part of the polytechnic’s approach to pedagogy and part of its commitment to providing learners with real world/industry experience. We are meeting on November 1 for a day-long symposium to share our practices and learn from each other. This event is will be facilitated by Billy Matheson of EXP Ltd.

    The intentions of the day are to:

    • Connect as practitioners 
    • Develop a shared understanding of the current state of PBLC practice at Otago Polytechnic
    • Share and capture stories of good practice and learning insights
    • Test the appetite of the group to work together to advance PBLC in the future
    • Identify a small number of actionable initiatives that could support PBLC practice across the institution

    Preparation

    In preparation for the workshop, you are asked to take some time to describe ONE project based learning initiative that you are currently/recently working on, Please choose a project has depth and that you are excited about. 

    Please consider the following questions and bring your answers to the workshop:

    1. Who are you partnering with? (community and/or organisation)
    2. What level are the learners involved?
    3. Whose idea was the project (who initiated)
    4. What other stakeholders are involved?
    5. What is the project?
    6. What are the learning outcomes?
    7. What does success look like for the learner?
    8. What does success look like for the community partner?
    9. What are the bigger picture learning outcomes? (for the sector)
    10. What is a question or problem that you would like to think through with the group?

    If you are interested in learning about project-based learning with communities, but not yet using that approach in your teaching practice, you are welcome to come along to listen and learn from your colleagues.

    I look forward to it!

    Many thanks
    Caro

  • Liz Ditzel's inaugural professorial event (November 6 2019)

    We warmly invite you to join us at our upcoming inaugural professorial event:

    WHO: Professor Liz Ditzel
    WHAT: Educating nurses: Insights from management
    WHEN: 5.30pm on Tuesday 12 November 2019
    WHERE: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin
    RSVPs essential for catering purposes

     

    “Nursing education has changed dramatically in my lifetime – from a paid apprenticeship system, to today’s student-centred model with clinical nursing practice supported by preceptors.  In this presentation I reflect upon my professional practice as a Registered Nurse, my teaching role as an educator, and I explain how ‘management’ principles and theory have shaped the development of nursing knowledge and practice.”

     

    Professor Liz Ditzel is a Registered Nurse and a nursing educator, active researcher and mentor in the School of Nursing at Otago Polytechnic.

  • Pinnacle Events (November 7 2019)

    This year's High Performance Sport Symposium has the theme Pinnacle Events.

    Register to see Noeline Taurua (Silver Ferns), Tony Brown (Japan Rugby) and Leonard King (NZ Basketball) speak about what it takes to prepare a team for a World Cup event.

    Noeline will talk about what happened behind the scenes at the INF Netball World Cup, where the Silver Ferns triumphed and became world champions.

    WHEN: 11- 12 November 2019

    WHERE: Otago Polytechnic, Sargood Centre, Logan Park, Dunedin

    VIEW MAP

    HOW: click here for more information and to register

    Registration for the symposium is free and open to anyone wanting to improve their knowledge of elite coaching. 

  • Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Seminar (September 26 2019)

    We invite you to spend an afternoon with our staff and students where you will learn all about construction management and quantity surveying and the opportunities open to you when you graduate with an Otago Polytechnic diploma or degree qualification.

    You will also have the opportunity to join us on a site visit and talk to recent graduates who are now working in the industry.

    Date: Thursday, October 17

    Time: 3.30pm to 5.15pm

    Meet: College of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences 100 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin, Room L105

    RSVP: Monday, October 14 to ECLadmin@op.ac.nz or phone 0800 762 786

    Entry is FREE. Bookings are essential. A waitlist will be kept if further spaces become available. Afternoon tea/light refreshments will be provided.
    To ensure safety please wear sensible shoes (no jandals or sandals). Normal school shoes would be suitable.

    Find out more about our construction programmes here.

  • Sudden Unexplained Death in Infancy (SUDI) (September 23 2019)

    Less than one SUDI per ten thousand babies – can we do it?

    TODAY tune in to this month's Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminar.

    When: Monday 23 September 2019, from 1pm
    Who: Dr Christine McIntosh - GP Liaison – Child Health | Primary & Integrated Care, Middlemore Hospital, Counties Manukau Health 
    How: This free webinar is available online via Adobe Connect - click here to participate.

    Currently SUDI claims the lives of about 7 babies per 10,000 in New Zealand, despite a lot being done in the SUDI prevention arena. How will we achieve the target? Christine will present on a new approach to SUDI risk assessment, through the use of the safe sleep calculator, and how this can focus SUDI protection care to those babies and their whanau who most need it.

    Presenter bio: GP and Cure Kids SUDI researcher (doctoral candidate) at the University of Auckland with Em. Prof. Ed Mitchell and Assoc. Prof. John Thompson and Clinical Lead of the SUDI Protection care Programme in South Auckland.

     

  • Mental Health Awareness Week (23-29 September) (September 20 2019)

    Run each year by the Mental Health Foundation, the 2019 theme is Explore your way to wellbeing – Wh¯aia te ara hauora, Whitiora. 

    The week is an opportunity for you to explore the experiences, actions, relationships and surroundings that make you feel good and uplift your wellbeing.

    Get involved

    1. Visit our stand
    From 11.30am – 1.00pm in The Hub each day (Dunedin Campus), you can visit our stand and pick up information and resources to support your own mental health, and/or the mental health of your wh¯anau, friends and learners. Throughout the week, you can also explore your wellbeing with the Warrant of Fitness checklist. 

    2. Indulge in art therapy
    Visit the mindfulness table in The Hub (Dunedin Campus). There will be images for you to colour in, and opportunities to add words about what you are grateful for, and what you do to support your wellbeing.

    3. Wellbeing Wednesday
    Pop into The Hub (Dunedin Campus) between 10.00am and 2.00pm to enjoy a variety of student-led wellbeing activities.

    4. Sign up to receive alerts
    Visit the Mental Health Foundation’s website and register for updates.

    5. Order resources
    Order or download resources from the Mental Health Foundation’s website.

    Need support?

    We have lots of support available to our learners. Our Chaplain Steve Downey is happy to meet with you, and you can call or text 1737 any time if you need to talk. 

     

    Otago Polytechnic learners

  • Product Design Open Day - Tuesday 1 October (September 18 2019)

    Do you want to develop meaningful products that improve the way we live?

    Are you looking for a career in NZ’s leading industry sector?

     

    >Study Product Design 

     

    Product Design is an exciting, ever-evolving profession focused on designing objects and systems to improve the way we live. It is a fun and dynamic industry to work in – and products designed in New Zealand are our country’s highest export earner!

    With our Bachelor of Design (Product) you will gain an international qualification that will give you skills in conceptualisation, drawing, model-making, CAD software, graphic design and production methods. You will also enjoy hands-on learning through internships, project partnerships, industry experience and international exchanges.

     

    Find out more at our Open Day

    Tuesday 1 October, 2019

    Open Day: 11.00am to 2.00pm

     

    Interested students and parents are welcome to attend an informative day that includes:

    • A studio and workshop tour
    • A portfolio workshop – we invite you to bring in your recent work for comment for pre-approval
    • An opportunity to meet our lecturers and current students
    • A free lunch

     

    Cost : Free

    Please RSVP to Pam.Hodgkinson@op.ac.nz by 27 September (late bookings will be accepted if places are available)

     

     

  • Navigating and nurturing the student journey (August 27 2019)

    Please join us for the fourth of our ‘Research for Education’ seminars.

    WHEN: 4 to 5pm, Tuesday 10 September 2019
    WHERE: H224 or Skype (details below)
    WHAT: Navigating and nurturing the Student Nurse journey towards clinical excellence
    WHO: Rebecca McDiarmid and Donna Burkett, both from Otago Polytechnic’s School of Nursing, will lead this session

    The unique landscape of New Zealand healthcare settings requires new graduate nurses to be responsive to the variation in complexities of care and health workforce dynamics. To prepare new graduate nurses for this evolving landscape and equip nurses with the skills to sustain practice into the future, the presenters have successfully implementated a peer clinical coaching programme within undergraduate nursing curriculum in New Zealand.  The clinical coaching programme provided a strategic connection of learners with enhanced opportunities to embed professional competencies required by Nursing Council of New Zealand.

    Clinical coaching was an initiative developed in response to challenges learners had with the ability to articulate and demonstrate aspects of clinical competency, mainly delegation and direction of care. The teaching and learning process focuses on creating a community of learning by connecting year three to year one learners. Once connected,  the process of clinical coaching occurs, simulating collegial relationships based on concepts of enhanced communication, collegial attributes, compentency development in a culture of safe learning.  Clinical coaching provides the opportunity for learners to translate competency into practice, develop capacity for leadership awareness and ultimately enhance patient health outcomes.

    The learner response to clinical coaching has been extremely positive and prompted the presenters to formally caputure the learner voice in order to share and publish the experience. Results from  this research highlight the learners increased confidence in their own ability to articulate readiness for practice through the ability to demonstrate clincial competency for the transition in expectations and responsibilities with the Registered Nurse role.

    Since the inital implementation of clinical coaching the presenters have continued to grow and develop the experience, which has lead to the development of the CORE teaching and learning model. This model will be explored in detail throughout the presentation. The audience will appreciate the passion and delivery in which the presenters articulate the desire to create teaching and learning opportunities to navigate clinical excellence.

    We look forward to seeing you there.

     

    .........................................................................................................................................

    Join Skype Meeting      

    Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App

    Join by phone

    +64 3 479 3636 | 0800 765 004 (New Zealand)                             English (Australia)

    Find a local number

    Conference ID: 7459016

    Forgot your dial-in PIN? |Help    

    Communications may be monitored or recorded.

  • What's Hot - 150 Year Perspective (August 8 2019)

    Our own Prof Sally Baddock is one of four speakers celebrating 150 years of the Otago Institute for the Arts and Sciences:

    TUESDAY 20 AUGUST, 5.30PM, HUTTON THEATRE, OTAGO MUSEUM

    The Otago Institute for the Arts and Sciences presents: What's Hot: 150 Year Perspective

    Speakers are:

    • Dr Ian Griffin (Otago Museum): "The Architecture of the Heavens: the evolution of our ideas about the Universe"
    • Prof. Sally Baddock (Otago Polytechnic): "Sleeping like a Baby through 150 years"
    • Prof. Alan Musgrave (University of Otago): "Can a contradiction be true as well as false? And what happens to science if we say 'Yes'?
    • Dr Nic Mortimer (NGS Science): "The Discovery of Zealandia: Earth's 8th Continent"

    Nibbles and cash bar available after the talks.

  • Integrating the Sustainable Development Goals into Learning and Teaching (August 6 2019)

    Please join us for the third of our ‘Research for Education’ seminars:

    Integrating the sustainable development goals into learning and teaching

    In many ways Otago Polytechnic has led the new Zealand ITP sector in the area of sustainable practice for some time.  It would be easy to fall into the trap that we have already met our goal to lead in sustainable practice by 2021. However, when you start to look more carefully at how we understand sustainability, and how that understanding manifests itself in learning and teaching, it is fair to question whether we may have let things slip.

    In this presentation Ray O'Brien will present what he has discovered about sustainable practice at Otago Polytechnic over the last two years, and how integration of the United Nations Sustainability Goals can enhance our performance as we move into a period of complex organisational change.

    When: 4 to 5pm Tuesday 27 August 2019
    Where: H224 or by Skype

    .........................................................................................................................................

    Join Skype Meeting      

    Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App

    Join by phone

    +64 3 479 3636 | 0800 765 004 (New Zealand)                             English (Australia)

    Find a local number

    Conference ID: 355250

     Forgot your dial-in PIN? |Help    

    Communications may be monitored or recorded.

  • Grey Willow exhibition (July 31 2019)

    An exhibition of alluring pastel landscapes by Hannah Joynt opens Friday 2 August at 5pm.

    Where: OLGA, 32 Moray Place, Dunedin

    When:  Saturday 12 to 2pm, Tuesday to Friday 10am to 5pm, until Thursday 13 August

    “Structures aren’t some kind of universal, timeless truth waiting to be uncovered. Rather, structures are fictions that we create in order to be able to interpret the world around us.”

    Hannah Joynt is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Design, lecturing in Creative Studies. Her teaching practice is informed by her art practice. Since graduating with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Otago Polytechnic in 2006, Hannah has been building her reputation as an emerging artist in the South Island of New Zealand. In 2009, she won the COCA Anthony Harper Contemporary Art Award (Christchurch) and the Edinburgh Realty Art Award in 2010 (Dunedin).

    Image: Botanical Paradox, 2018, Pastel on Matt board, 80 x 80cm, used with the artist's permission

    olgaolgaolga.co.nz

  • Māori Data Sovereignty (August 24 2019)

    All are welcome to join this Research and Innovation Seminar hosted by the School of Midwifery:

    WHO: Māui Hudson - Associate Professor, Te Pua Wānanga ki te Ao|Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies, Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato|The University of Waikato

    WHAT: Approaches to Māori Data Sovereignty

    WHEN: 1pm on Monday 26 August 2019

    HOW: Click here to participate in this online webinar

    Topic: Māori Data Sovereignty is concerned with Māori rights and interests in data and it has become a hot topic as institutions explore the usefulness of the data they collect and consider how widely it can be shared. This presentation will outline some of the approaches that have been developed to think through issues of Māori Data Sovereignty, Māori Data Governance and Māori Data Ethics.

    Bio: Māui Hudson is an interdisciplinary researcher based in the Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato.  He has specific interests in the application of mātauranga Māori to decision-making and the interface with science.  His research expertise is in the areas of Māori ethics, the interface between mātauranga Māori and science, ethical issues for Māori in genetic research and new technologies, Māori economic development, and indigenous data sovereignty.

     

  • Nobel Prize Winner Talk 15 July @ Otago Museum (July 12 2019)

    Fourteen billion years on, what can we learn about the original imperfection?

    “Behold, we were shapen in asymmetry; and in imperfection did the universe conceive us.”

    The Dodd Walls Centre, Otago Museum and the University of Otago are proud to present Nobel Prize winner, Professor Eric Cornell.

    We usually learn about the universe, and the particles that fill it, from telescopes and particle accelerators. When they aren't good enough, is there a third way? Professor Cornell discusses the role of precision measurement as the third way of gaining insight into the fundamental nature of the universe.

    Professor Cornell is a senior scientist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a professor adjoint in the Physics Department of the University of Colorado. His research interests are ultracold atoms and using precision molecular spectroscopy to explore possible extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics. His most recent research includes a project to measure the electric dipole moment of the electron; a project designed to investigate supersymmetry.

    Professor Cornell has received many awards for his work, including the Carl Zeiss Award and the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics, and is a Member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Join us for a fascinating talk from one of the world’s foremost experts in precision measurement. Drinks, nibbles, and access to Tūhura Otago Community Trust Science Centre will be available before and after Professor Cornell’s hour-long presentation. Children are welcome.

    Tickets are free, but limited, so book early to avoid disappointment.

    5pm doors open. Talk commences at 5.30pm. Event concludes at 7pm.

    Book Tickets
  • Prof Jane Venis' inaugural professorial event (July 11 2019)

    Please register to join us at our upcoming professorial event:

    Title: Laughing Matter: Critiquing popular culture through the materiality of absurd objects
    Date: Wednesday 21 August 2019
    Time: 5:45 for 6:00pm
    Venue: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 30 The Octagon, Dunedin
    Register: By Friday 16 August 2019 online

    Jane Venis creates nonsensical multi-purpose devices and musical instruments which not only comment on our thirst for gadgets but also critique the design of arguably useless products and systems.  She uses humour as an entry point to entice the viewer to access works that have multiple meanings.  For the viewer, layers of understanding may be evoked through the choice of particular materials used in ironic and satirical works that highlight the absurdities of contemporary popular culture.

    Materiality is not just a concern about the physical properties of the materials used to make an art work, it is deeply concerned with the histories and implications of the use of those particular materials. The concerns of materiality cannot be disassociated from those of critical theory, as specific materials are used to invite the viewer into a political dialogue with an artwork or object.  
     
    Jane will perform with some of her recently made instruments and present various satirical video snippets. She will also link key aspects of her research practice with some useful teaching and learning strategies.   

    Professor Jane Venis is an Academic Leader in the School of Design and a Postgraduate Supervisor at the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic.

    Image credit: Jane Venis, Paua Trip (2019): corrugated paua and possum fur baritone ukulele

     

    600x180 Professorial Series header 2019

  • Legends Long Lunch | Friday 29 November (September 16 2019)

    Join us for an unforgettable long lunch with inspirational New Zealander of the Year, Mike King ONZM.

    When: 1.30pm, Friday 29 November, 2019
    Where: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin
    Dress:  Business
    Cost:  $120

    Mike King has been roundly praised for shining a light on the effects and impacts of mental health, particularly among young people and Māori.

    Drawing on his own experiences of mental illness and addiction, his work is aimed at effecting positive social change.

    Also speaking at the event will be Ruby Dunbar and Kate Hurst, two inspirational learners who have received support from the Otago Polytechnic Education Foundation to help build a school in Uganda.

    The event includes a delicious lunch and complementary wine. You will also have the opportunity to participate in our exclusive Charity Auction.

    All proceeds will go to the Otago Polytechnic Education Foundation to support:

    • international learning experiences for students
    • specialised learning facilities
    • community initiatives

    Otago Polytechnic Education Foundation – Making Positive Change in the World

    Tickets available from Eventbrite

  • Barriers to breastfeeding (July 5 2019)

    The School of Midwifery invites you to join the next Research & Innovation Seminar:

    Presenter: Sally Baddock, Professor, School of Midwifery

    Topic: What are the motivators and barriers to breastfeeding continuation in a mainly Māori community in New Zealand?

    When: 13:00, Monday 29 July 2019

    Where: Click here to connect online

    Breastfeeding has many well established benefits for infant health as well as impacting on later cognitive ability and educational achievement. The age of cessation of breastfeeding is lower in many indigenous populations compared to non-indigenous populations suggesting there may be cultural specific influences. In this presentation Sally will share survey data on breastfeeding collected from a mainly Māori cohort in Hawkes Bay as part of a larger infant sleep study. The data identify the motivators and barriers to breastfeeding experienced by these women and lead on to suggestions for ways to extend breastfeeding duration in this cohort.

    Bio: Professor Sally Baddock is a Professor in the School of Midwifery with leadership roles across the polytechnic and a focus on research. She has taught in the Health Sciences for over 30 years and continues to teach physiology at postgraduate level and supervises candidates for the Master of Midwifery. Sally has developed a strong platform of research in the area of infant behaviour and physiology during sleep and the impact of sleep practices on sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI). This includes investigating the benefits and risks of practices while acknowledging the importance of cultural context. She is part of a team that has produced significant research outputs from four major studies on infant sleep  – three of which have been funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand. 

    These School of Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminars are held on-line via Adobe Connect roughly once per month on a Monday at 1pm.

  • Careers in Engineering Technology Expo (August 5 2019)

    Want a career in engineering? ... Come along to our Careers in Engineering Technology expo!

     

    With our region about to embark on one of its biggest building booms, the construction industry now has a high demand for qualified Engineering Technicians and Technologists to work in the areas of civil, mechanical and electrical engineering.

    If you have ever considered a career in engineering this is an expo not to be missed. Representatives from Fisher & Paykel, Farra, Beca and NZ Engineering will provide an overview of the engineering industry and our staff will be available to discuss the best study pathways for you – from bridging certificates to degree programmes.

     

    Date: Monday, August 5

    Time: 5.30pm to 7.00pm

    Venue: The Hub, Dunedin Campus, Forth Street, Dunedin

  • Careers in Healthcare Expo (July 30 2019)

    Want to work as a healthcare professional?

    Find out how at our Careers in Healthcare expo!

    Find out about our programmes in:

    • Nursing
    • Midwifery
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Social Services - Career Practice, Counselling, Mental Health Support or Disability Support and Coordination
    • Sport, Exercise and Health
    • Massage Therapy
    • Degree and diploma bridging options

    This is your opportunity to explore your healthcare career options at our expo and by attending a range of informative seminars.

    Learn about our healthcare programmes, what you need to do to apply to study in 2020 – and speak to our qualified staff, healthcare practitioners and industry professionals about your healthcare career aspirations.


    Date: Tuesday, July 30

    Time: 5.30pm to 7.00pm (presentations begin at 5.45pm)

    Venue: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin

  • Weighing in (May 14 2019)

    The next School of Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminar will be presented by George Parker.

    WHEN: 1pm, Monday 17 June 2019
    WHERE: click here to join online

    George's topic is Weighing in: Midwives' views on body weight, health and the fat maternal body.

    “In this presentation I will describe research I have in-progress which is analysing in-depth semi-structured one-one interviews and small focus groups with 24 New Zealand midwives (both core and LMC) on their views and experiences of working with women with a high BMI.  This critical qualitative research aims to identify how midwives understand and approach weight management and the politics of the fat pregnant body, navigate their own embodiment in their practice, and how they see their role in relation to maternal health promotion more generally. In this presentation I will explore the need for this research and overview some preliminary findings demonstrating the importance of midwifery ontology and epistemology in shaping the care and management of maternal obesity.”

    Bio: George Parker is a lecturer in the postgraduate team in the School of Midwifery at Otago Polytechnic and also lectures in Medical Humanities at the University of Auckland.  George is a registered midwife and is completing a doctorate in Health Sociology at the University of Auckland.  George is passionate about compassionate, equitable and just approaches to maternal health care and the unique contribution midwives can make in the movement for reproductive and health justice.

  • The Work of Architecture (May 13 2019)

    You are warmly invited to a guest lecture by Peggy Deamer.

    WHEN: Monday, 20th May, at 4.30PM

    WHERE: Room H300, H Block, Otago Polytechnic, Corner Forth Street and Union Street, Dunedin

    Peggy's topic is The Work of Architecture.

    peggy deamer is professor of architecture at yale university. she is a principal in the firm of deamer, architects and before that, deamer + phillips, architects. she received a b.arch. from the cooper union and a ph.d. from princeton university. the work of her firms has appeared in dwellthe new york timesarchitectural record and house and garden, amongst others. articles by deamer have appeared in assemblagepraxislogperspecta, and harvard design magazine, amongst others journals and anthologies. she is the editor of the millennium housearchitecture and capitalism: 1845 to the present and the architect as worker: immaterial laborthe creative class, and the politics of design. she is co-editor of building in the future: recasting architectural laborbim in academia, andre-reading perspecta. she is the founding member of the architecture lobby, a group advocating for the value of architectural design and labor. her current research explores the relationship between subjectivity, design, and labor in the current economy.

  • "I Remember Nothing" (May 13 2019)

    Come and see Michael Morley's exhibition, until 29 May.

    WHEN: Tuesday to Friday 10:00am to 5:00pm, Saturday 10:00am to 2:00pm

    WHERE: OLGA, 32 Moray Place, Dunedin

    Considered by many to be first and foremost a sound artist, Michael Morley utilises varied media to explore the role of sound, colour, aesthetics and the nature of memory and perception. The etchings and paintings in I Remember Nothing have been produced in the last ten years and form part of Morley’s prismatic aural, experiential, and visual art practice.

    Michael Morley is a Lecturer in the Dunedin School of Art.

  • Texpo returns! (May 2 2019)

    See and experience Dunedin's most innovative tech products, research and industries.

    WHEN: 11:00am to 3:00pm, Saturday 25 May

    WHERE: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, and Otago Business School, University of Otago, Union Street East

    REGISTER HERE TO ATTEND

    To register your exhibitor interest in this free event contact the Dunedin Techweek Coordinator.

    Dunedin TEXpo is our free, collaborative, cross campus showcase of innovative tech research, products and industries in our great city. 

    With two sites on Union St East: The University of Otago Business School and the Otago Polytechnic Hub, there will be loads of interesting tech on display, from business exhibits and demonstrations, emerging technologies and hi-tech innovations produced by staff and students at each institution. Things to get your hands on, something for the whole family!

    techweek19 logo long blue official event medium

     

  • Designing Solutions (May 2 2019)

    The Britten Institute is bringing the Designing solutions for the 21st Century workshop to TechWeek 2019!

    WHEN: 9:00am to 12:00 noon, Thursday 23 May

    WHERE: G303, G Block, Otago Polytechnic, Union Street, Dunedin

    COST: $175

    REGISTER HERE

    The Britten Institute welcomes the opportunity to challenge the way we design products and services that meet 21st century needs. This is not all about clever technology but about meeting the demonstrable needs of people, planet and profit. 

    Whether you are designing services, systems or products, the time has come to think more deeply about value. Our future demands it!

    This 3-hour interactive workshop includes time for discussion, that is you challenge us and one another.

    Featuring Dorenda Britten, an experienced design strategist and creative thinker. Dorenda challenges our ethical frameworks. She is passionate about inspiring people to do business for the good of people, the planet and profit.

    techweek19 logo long blue official event medium

  • Minecraft Hour of Code (May 2 2019)

    Take part in a supervised online tutorial that will help you explore computer coding, working with the popular Minecraft game.

    WHEN: 11:00am to 3:00pm, Saturday 25 May

    WHERE: H611, H Block, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin

    CLICK HERE TO REGISTER HERE

    This event is free but registration is essential as this was fully booked last year. The same tutorial will be repeated four times, starting on the hour.

    In this activity you will use blocks of code to take Steve or Alex on adventure through their Minecraft world. The activity takes approximately one hour. The timing of this series of four sessions from 11am to 3pm coincides with the Texpo at the Otago Polytechnic and University of Otago.

    This event is supervised by Information Technology lecturers Elise Allen and Paul Admiraal.

    techweek19 logo long blue official event medium

  • Multiplayer gaming event (May 2 2019)

    DuneCorps is a community initiative for young video game enthusiasts.

    WHEN: 9am to 2pm, Saturday 25 May

    WHERE: Sargood Centre, Logan Park Drive, Dunedin

    REGISTER HERE

    This is a free event but registration of players is essential. Spectators are welcome.

    This innovative initiative specializes in networking computer systems in order to play multiplayer video games with peers congregating within the same room. A platform is provided for young video game enthusiasts to exercise their favourite hobby while participating in an authentic, social atmosphere. The groups run in Gore, Invercargill, Queenstown, Timaru and is now being brought to Dunedin.

    Using crowd-sourced funding, equipment is available to run sessions for up to 20 young people so they can enjoy gaming in a healthier, more social way - thus giving young people not interested in traditional sports, a place to learn the skills of teamwork and enjoy mutual hobbies with their peer group outside of school.

    This Techweek 2019 event is sponsored by Otago Polytechnic and Electric Kiwi.

    techweek19 logo long blue official event medium

  • Good Medicine or a Professional Placebo? (April 18 2019)

    On Monday 13 May we will have our next Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminar series presentation. The School of Midwifery seminar series are held on-line via Adobe Connect roughly once per month on a Monday at 1pm.

    Our May presentation is by Emma Bilous, Senior Lecturer – School of Midwifery

    Title: Undergraduate Rural Health Immersion Education: Good Medicine or a Professional Placebo?

    Domestic and international evidence supports educating rural people within their community as a means of addressing rural workforce and retention issues. Midwifery education providers have been early adopters of this approach and have been providing rural immersion education in a blended satellite model since 2009.

    By considering Central Otago as a case study for this model of education, this exploration will seek to answer the question as to whether this approach has been 'good medicine' in terms of building a sustainable rural midwifery workforce. Or has it turned out to be a professional placebo, whereby unpredictable variables undermine the education strategy essentially resulting in no treatment, despite good feelings, to rural workforce issues.

    Bio:   Emma Bilous has been a rural midwife for over twenty years and has nearly a decade of experience in midwifery education. She has an affection for working with rural families through pregnancy, birth and early parenting coupled with a strong commitment to the development of equitable, accessible and sustainable rural maternity services.

    The link for Monday 13 May 2019 at 1pm is: https://adobeconnect.op.ac.nz/research13519/

     

  • The ocean now? (April 3 2019)

    Alex Monteith is speaking soon at the Dunedin School of Art:

    WHEN: 12:00 to 1:00pm, Thursday 23 May 2019
    WHERE: Room P152, Dunedin School of Art, Riego Street, Dunedin

    Alex Monteith works with video/new media. Alex will present on a range of collaborative works that both she has made, and that the collective Local Time (Danny Butt, Jon Bywater, Alex Monteith & Natalie Robertson) has produced around the coast or about fresh water. The seminar will consider recent art projects that address contemporary coastal living in Moana Nui and Aotearoa in light of emergent eco-tourism economies and recent legal claims on ocean and water. It will also touch on aspects of indigenous/tauiwi partnerships and/or collectivity that have evolved within the works.

    Bio:

    Alex Monteith’s works explore the political dimensions of culture in turmoil over land ownership, history and occupation. She is working on a series of artworks focused on bodies of water that evince tensions both historical and natural. These have included an ongoing series on the Rena Disaster (2011-current) in Aotearoa, and a series of work focused on Te Mimi o Tū Te Rakiwhānoa (Fiordland Coastal Marine Area) in relation to recent archaeological history in Aotearoa. Other works traverse political movements, contemporary sports, culture and social activities and projects often taking place in large-scale or extreme geographies. She is also a member of the collective Local Time (Alex Monteith, Danny Butt, Jon Bywater, Natalie Robertson). Local Time has been named as a collective since 2007, usually working in collaboration with maintainers of local knowledge in specific sites, and engaging in debates concerning colonial histories and cross-cultural exchange through art projects, contemporary art teaching and critical writing. Alex is a some-time political and environmental activist.

    Exhibitions have included a survey exhibition at the Govett Brewster Art Gallery 2012, and a solo exhibition at MMK Frankfurt, Germany, 2012. Alex was a recipient of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand New Generation Award (2008), and a Walters Prize finalist (2010). She is currently a senior lecturer at the Elam School of Fine Arts, the University of Auckland, Aotearoa, having held prior lecturing positions at AUT (2006) and MIT (2007‐08).

    techweek19 logo long blue official event

    Image credit: "osecours", 3 Sep 2010, used under Creative Commons licence CC BY-NC 2.0 

  • Complexity as a methodology (April 3 2019)

    Here's a chance to hear what one of our colleagues is passionate about!

    WHEN: 4:30 - 4:45pm. Tuesday 9 April 2019

    CLICK HERE TO CONNECT: https://adobeconnect.op.ac.nz/otresearchop/

    The presenter is Codi Ramsey, lecturer in Occupational Therapy. Her topic is Complexity as a methodology: A new spin on an old idea, using complex systems theory to study multi-factorial issues in sport and health.

     

  • Improving Learner Numeracy (March 19 2019)

    This year’s Research for Education seminar series kicks off soon:


    WHEN: 4:00 - 5:00PM, TUESDAY 2 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: ROOM H224, H BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN
    OR CLICK HERE TO JOIN ONLINE VIA SKYPE


    Brigid Casey will start this year's series with a session on Improving Learner Numeracy. 

    "In New Zealand and internationally, there is growing concern that learners are entering tertiary education with lower mathematics competency than educators expect. Many learners struggle with mathematics and may even avoid quantitative courses altogether. In this seminar, I will briefly describe a research project that included a pilot intervention aimed at addressing low numeracy. This will be followed by a discussion on the outcomes of the research, including implications for practice for educators, learning advisors, and tertiary education organisations."

    Brigid is an Academic Advisor with the Learning and Teaching Development team at Otago Polytechnic.

  • Public Lecture - Creating Happy: The innovation of the Experience Economy - Wed 27 March (March 20 2019)

    Mahuki and Otago Polytechnic are proud to host Mk Haley, Walt Disney Imagineering Academic Outreach and UCLA Faculty, for an inspirational talk.

    Wednesday 27th March
    5.00pm-6.30pm
    Room G106

     

    Mk Haley will draw on extensive experience at The Walt Disney Company to explore the future of 'the experience' within the cultural heritage sector and beyond.

    In a hour-long talk focussed on creating impactful and lasting audience experiences, Mk will share her expertise in designing new experiences, drawing on Disney projects she has designed.

     

    About Mk Haley

    MK Haley has been an educator for more than 25 years teaching for a variety of University programmes, including the Disney Imagineering – UCLA partnership in Themed Entertainment Design, and recently served as both the Associate Executive Producer and a Faculty member at the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University. Mk previously taught Experience and Themed Entertainment Design at Florida State University, where she also served as the Entrepreneur in Residence for the College of Fine Arts.

    Mk Haley has been with The Walt Disney Company since 1994 serving primarily with Walt Disney Imagineering in both technical and creative roles with the Virtual Reality teams, R&D, Special FX, Show Quality Services, and the Disney Research Labs. She has a BFA and an MFA in computer animation. Mk has also served Disney Corporate initiatives related to New Technology programs and collaboration tools, as well as Disney Digital Media initiatives with their Television Groups.

    With more than 25 years of service to industry associations, Mk has served as Conference and Technology chair for ACM SIGGRAPH and The Themed Entertainment Association. She is currently supporting the ACM-W team, the Association for Computing Machinery’s group that supports, celebrates, and advocates internationally for the full engagement of women in all aspects of computing fields.

    This event is presented in partnership with the U.S. Embassy, Otago Polytechnic, Mahuki and National Services Te Paerangi, Te Papa.

    https://www.facebook.com/events/1079390692267576??ti=ia

  • The Artivist methods (April 9 2019)

    Hörður Torfason, Icelandic artist and activist, is speaking in Dunedin.


    WHEN: 5:30 - 6:30PM, THURSDAY 11 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN
    REGISTER ONLINE HERE


    This free public seminar about changing society will be presented by Hörður Torfason, a Icelandic artist and activist. His topic is "The Artivist methods. (When you don’t find a leader, become one yourself.)"

    Hörður Torfason maintains the role of the artist is to criticise, that criticism is a form of love: “We have to use reason, cultural roots, feelings and the precious gifts of life – our creativity, to ensure human rights aren’t undermined by economic growth and politics. It’s about learning every week, every day, new sides of corruption”, he says. “Inequality won’t be removed by conventional systems: “If you want to move a graveyard, don’t expect the inhabitants to help you.”

    A musician, actor and ”artivist”, Hörður was the founder, thinker, developer and spokesman for the organisation Raddir fólksins (“People’s voices”) in 2008 following the 2008 Icelandic financial crises. As a thinker in the Cutlery revolution and a human-rights campaigner, he has travelled widely around the world and lectured about his methods.

    Support from the Fred Staub Open Art foundation to bring Hörður Torfason to Dunedin is gratefully acknowledged.

     

  • The Living Wage, and Humanitarian Aid (March 20 2019)

    We have two topics for our second SIMBA research seminar, straight after Easter.


    WHEN: 12:00 - 12:50PM, TUESDAY 30 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: D101, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    Dr Steve Atkins will present two short talks. His topics are “Relative Deprivation Theory and the Living Wage,” and “Optimising competency profiles for staffing humanitarian aid teams.”

    Stephen is a Principal Lecturer in our School of Business and the Research Coordinator (Business) in the College of Art, Design, & Architecture. He lectures in business research methods, societal/ethical issues in business management, and organisational behaviour. Stephen's research interests include personality-fit-in-the-workplace, cross-cultural/mixed-methods R&D for career-guidance, and cognitions for social marketing. He also undertakes teamwork optimisation and team mission analysis in regards to humanitarian projects overseas and more-generally, volunteer staffing research.

    Our SIMBA seminar series is on the last Tuesday of the month during term time, always at 12 noon and in room D101. SIMBA stands for Supervision, Informatics, Management, Business and Analytics and the series covers a wide variety of interdisciplinary topics.

  • Computational Linguistics (March 20 2019)

    Join us for the first SIMBA research seminar of the year:


    WHEN: 12:00 - 12:50PM, TUESDAY 26 MARCH 2019
    WHERE: D101, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    The topic for this seminar is "Using computational linguistics to study universities institutional views, attitudes and biases."

    The presenter, David Rozado, is a Senior Lecturer in Information Technology at Otago Polytechnic. David holds a B.Sc. in Information Systems from Boston University, a M.Sc. in Bioinformatics from the Free University of Berlin and a Ph.D in Computer Science from the Autonomous University of Madrid. David joined Otago Polytechnic early in 2015. His main areas of research are Machine Learning and Accessibility software for users with motor impairment. He currently teaches Data Science, Machine Intelligence, Algorithms Data Structures, and final year Project.

    Our SIMBA seminar series is on the last Tuesday of the month during term time, always at 12 noon and in room D101. SIMBA stands for Supervision, Informatics, Management, Business and Analytics and the series covers a wide variety of interdisciplinary topics.

  • Learner Capability and Employability: presentation of interim findings (March 18 2019)

    Come and hear the interim findings of our Learner Capability and Employability research.

    WHEN: 5:00 to 6:30pm, Wednesday 22 May

    WHERE: Otago Southland Employers Association, 16 McBride Street, Dunedin

    COST: Free for OSEA members, $30 plus GST for non-members

    REGISTER HERE

    This is a  presentation  to  employers  about  the  capabilities  they've  told us  they  want  graduates  to  have  on  starting  employment,  and how  technology  (an  e-portfolio)  can  help  employers  have confidence  that  job  applicants  actually  have  the  soft  skills,  or capabilities,  that  they  claim,  and  also  capture  ongoing  learning by  employees.

    Background:

    In  the  first  phase  of  this  project,  academic  staff  interviewed employers  from  a  wide  range  of  industries  and  professions  to test  and  validate  our  identified  learner  capabilities. The  results  will  reveal  how  employer  priorities  differ  depending on  the  disciplines  in  which  the  learners  have  graduated.    This data  will  immediately  inform  programme  design  and  delivery, to  provide  learners  with  opportunities  to  acquire  these capabilities  and  to  gather  evidence  of  their  capabilities,  which they  can  use  in  applying  for  employment  after  graduation.

    Who for:

    • Business  owners  who  employ  staff
    • Managers  and  supervisors
    • HR  and  training  advisers
    • Recruiters
    • Anyone interested in the future of learning

    Presenter:

    In  his  role  of  Director:  Employability  at Otago  Polytechnic,    Andy  Kilsby  leads the  Learner  Capability  research  project. Prior  to  joining  Otago  Polytechnic, Andy  led  the  Malcam  Charitable  Trust, a  nationally  recognised  provider  of youth  development  services.  He  also enjoyed  a  17  year  management  career in  the  finance  sector,  working  for  three major  New  Zealand  banks.  He  has extensive  governance  experience  in secondary  education,  NGO  and community  development  organisations.

    techweek19 logo long blue official event medium

  • Tracking midwifery student course participation (March 18 2019)

    Our next Midwifery Research & Innovation Seminar series presentation is coming up shortly.


    WHEN: 1.00PM, MONDAY 1 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: ONLINE


    Our April presentation is by Kimberly Smith,  School of Midwifery Lecturer:

    Can student analytics be used to improve successful outcomes?  Tracking student course participation via Moodle, kuraCloud & Adobe Connect.

    "This talk is going to outline what I have put in place in the Bioscience courses in Midwifery around collecting ‘data’ regarding student participation/use of learning resources within the courses to inform conversations with students who may struggle and/or who perform poorly in course assessments.  And additionally to see if there appears to be any correlation between student participation data and course outcomes which could form the foundation for further research to identify how these data could be used to improve student course outcomes."

    Kimberly Smith has been teaching Bioscience courses across multiple health programs at OP since 2009 and has lead curriculum development of Bioscience courses in Midwifery, Nursing and Beauty Therapy, including the development of appropriate course aims & outcomes, development of course learning material within the online Lt kuraCloud platform, development of assessment strategies and assessment questions and the development of beneficial and interactive classroom lessons, both online and face-face. 

    The School of Midwifery seminar series are held on-line via Adobe Connect roughly once per month on a Monday at 1pm.

  • Australasian Nurse Educators Conference (March 6 2019)
    "Navigating the future of nursing through education and practice"

    Tena Koutou

    On behalf of the Organising Committee it is my pleasure to encourage you to attend the Australasian Nurse Educators Conference (ANEC) to be held November 18 – 20, 2019 at the Dunedin Centre.

    2019 marks the 18th year ANEC has been held, this conference is a well attended Australasian event with delegates from a wide variety of educational institutions, clinical practice and also attracts new researchers who are embarking on their journey. This conference also provides the opportunity for nurse educators and nurses from clinical practice to network with their Australasian colleagues.

    The last New Zealand hosted ANEC was held in Christchurch in 2017 with approximately 325 delegates in attendance from across Australasia. In 2019 we anticipate similar delegate numbers, this will be your opportunity to learn, share and newtwork and socialise with your colleagues..

    We look forward to welcoming you to Otepoti (Dunedin) in November 2019 

    Nga mihi
    On behalf of the Conference Organising Committee
    Ian Crabtree
    ANEC Conference Convenor

    Abstract submissions close 17 May 2019

    Registrations open 4 April 2019

    See the conference website for more information

  • The Artivist Methods (March 3 2019)

    International speaker Hörður Torfason is coming to Dunedin.


    WHEN: 5.30PM, THURSDAY 11 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    A musician, actor and ”artivist”, Hörður was the founder, thinker, developer and spokesman for the organisation Raddir fólksins (“People’s voices”) in 2008 following the 2008 Icelandic financial crises. As a thinker in the Cutlery revolution and a human-rights campaigner, he has travelled widely around the world and lectured about his methods. His presentation title is "The Artivist methods. (When you don’t find a leader, become one yourself.)”

    Hörður Torfason maintains the role of the artist is to criticise, that criticism is a form of love: “We have to use reason, cultural roots, feelings and the precious gifts of life – our creativity, to ensure human rights aren’t undermined by economic growth and politics. It’s about learning every week, every day, new sides of corruption”, he says. “Inequality won’t be removed by conventional systems: “If you want to move a graveyard, don’t expect the inhabitants to help you.”

    Register for this free seminar online here.

    Find out more about Hörður Torfason here

  • ITP Research Symposium (March 4 2019)

    You're invited to Napier, to this year's national ITP research sympoium.


    WHEN: MONDAY 15 APRIL AND TUESDAY 16 APRIL 2019
    WHERE: EASTERN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 501 GLOUCESTER STREET, TARADALE


    The theme of the symposium is Whanaungatanga community-centred research, demonstrating the key role that New Zealand’s institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) play in ensuring that research has a tangible impact and benefits our communities. We have three excellent keynote speakers secured, and over 60 other presenters from ITPs around the country are coming to share their community-centred research.

    Deadline for registration is 29 March 2019. For more information and to register, visit the ITP Research website.

     

  • Nursing Research Forum (March 1 2019)

    Everyone is cordially invited to our second Nursing Research Forum:


    WHEN: 12.20-12.50 WEDNESDAY 6 MARCH 2019
    WHERE: H224, LEVEL 2, H BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    This week's forum will be presented by Associate Professor Jean Ross. Her topic is "Publishing your research in Scope."

  • Nursing Research Forum (February 25 2019)

    You are cordially invited to our first weekly Nursing Research Forum.


     WHEN: WEDNESDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2019, 12.20 to 12.50PM
    WHERE: H224, Level 2, H BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    The topic for the first session is The emerging use of augmented reality: Holographic nursing education. This will be presented by Prof Liz Ditzel and Emma Collins. 

  • Date Change for Prof Sally Baddock event (February 27 2019)

    Note change of DATE and VENUE! Please join us to celebrate Sally Baddock's professorship with her inaugural professorial event.


    WHEN: 5.30PM, WEDNESDAY 6 MARCH 2019
    WHERE: HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    Complexities, culture and interventions around safe infant sleep

    Professor Sally Baddock will discuss the complexities of infant-adult bedsharing and the balance between benefits for the infant and family and potentially hazardous situations, based on international research and cross-cultural collaborations. She will draw on interviews with families gathering their perspectives, as well as overnight video and physiological monitoring of sleeping families in their home, and recent investigations of infant sleep devices such as the wahakura (flax bassinet) and Pēpi-pod (plastic bassinet), that potentially provide safer, culturally appropriate alternatives for families who wish to bedshare.

    Register to attend by Monday 4 March 2019

     

     

     

  • Public Exhibition: Dii Moffatt, NEXUS (February 18 2019)

    18-21 FEB, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, Reigo Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    Postgraduate Season Exhibition
    Dii Moffatt
    NEXUS
    Master of Visual Arts Exhibition

    EXHIBITION DATES
    18 - 21 February, 2019

    EXHIBITION OPENING
    Monday February 18
    4pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY
    Ground Floor, P Block
    Riego Street (off Albany St)
    Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS
    Monday to Friday
    10am – 4pm

  • Compression Members (January 14 2019)

    Michael Findlay, lecturer in architectural history and theory in the Bachelor of Architectural Studies at Otago Polytechnic, and a director of Museograph, will discuss aspects of the life and work of various overseas artists who found themselves in Dunedin, including Louis Boldini, an Italian architect who designed many of our buildings. In association with Compression Members.

    WHEN: 3 PM SUNDAY 27 JANUARY 2019
    WHERE: DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY, 30 THE OCTAGON, DUNEDIN

  • Information Day: Dunedin Campus (December 18 2018)

    Date: Wednesday, January 23

    Time: 3.30pm to 6.00pm

    Venue: The Hub, Ground Floor, H Block, Forth Street

    We are accepting applications for a number of our first and second semester programmes – so come and find out where your Otago Polytechnic journey could take you.

    Whether you have a career in mind, you are not sure which one would best suit your skills and interests or you are looking to gain the foundation skills to take on further study – come along to our information day and find out about our study options. 

    Map

  • Whanaungatanga: Community-Centred Research symposium (January 15 2019)

    We're seeking abstracts for presentations and artworks for the 2019 national ITP symposium by 10 February.

    Read more and submit your abstract online here.

  • Explore your career options at Make it Yours - Summer Camp (January 28 2019)

    Finished school and deciding what to do next? Keen to see first-hand what careers you could choose?

    Come to this hands-on three-day camp and get a taste of the careers that our programmes lead to. You'll meet heaps of people also looking to study here and you'll take part in cool, interactive workshops run by our Colleges and Schools.

  • Otago Polytechnic & SIT 2018 Research Symposium (October 1 2018)

    The 2018 joint annual research symposium for Otago Polytechnic and the Southern Institute of Technology was held in Invercargill on Monday 26 November.

    This provided an opportunity to share the varied and interesting research happening at Otago Polytechnic and SIT, with a wide range of 20-minute presentations from both institutions. 

    Programme

    Coffee        from 9:15 am                                            

    Opening/Karakia:  9:30 am

    Welcome by Dr Sally Bodkin-Allen, Research Manager, Southern Institute of Technology

    Session 1:  Te Taiao 9:40 – 10:40 am           Session chair: Sally Bodkin-Allen

    9:40 am

    Spatially mapping areas of water convergence to guide mitigation of farm contaminants in the Waituna Catchment

    Marapara-abstract.pdf

    Tapuwa Marapara, SIT

    10:00 am

    Let's do this! Engaging Invercargill locals with climate change action

    Palliser-abstract.pdf

    Anna Palliser, SIT

    10:20 am

    Folklore to reality? Global sea-level rise and the Maldivian “myth of extinction” 

    Liang-abstract.pdf

    Christine Liang, SIT

    Morning tea: 10:40 – 11:00 am

    Session 2: Hangarau 11:00 am – 12:20 pm    Session chair: Lesley Brook

    11:00 am

    Enhancing students’ learning to solve word problems in thermodynamics based from Newman’s Error Analysis

    Gabriel-abstract.pdf

    Carlo Gabriel, SIT

    11:20 am

    A framework for lean implementation in construction processes

    Thilakarathna-abstract.pdf

    Nilmini Thilakarathna, OP

    11:40 am

    Is Bart Simpson offering sage advice to New Zealand farmers?

    Ang-abstract.pdf

    Andy Ang, SIT

     

       

     

     

     

    Lunch: 12:00 – 1:00 pm (Provided)

    Session 4:  Hauora 1:00 – 2:40 pm               Session chair: Sonja Swale

    1:10 pm

    Cultural empathy – a comparison of levels of empathy between 1st year nursing students and 3rd year nursing students

    Carstensen-Domigan-abstract.pdf

    Cassie Carstensen and Jess Domigan, SIT

    1:30 pm 

    Seeking clinical excellence through the implementation of an innovative peer coaching model in undergraduate nursing education.

    McDiarmid-Burkett-abstract.pdf

    McDiarmid-Burkett-slides.pdf

    Rebecca McDiarmid and Donna Burkett, OP

    1:50 pm

    Longitudinal study examining the value of e-portfolios for students in an undergraduate nursing degree

    Madden-Harding-Bowes.pdf

    Karyn Madden, Lynda Harding, Katrina Bowes, SIT

    2:10 pm

    Assuming, playing, and de-roling as the patient! The commencement of a grounded theory study

    Rhodes-abstract.pdf

    Jo Rhodes, SIT

     

     

     

    Afternoon Tea: 2:40 – 3:10 pm


    Session 5:  Te Ao Hurihuri 3:10 – 05:00 pm   Session chair: Paulette Halstead

    3:10 pm

    Putting it to bed: Revising and completing a DIY feature film

    Gillies-abstract.pdf

    Patrick Gillies, SIT

    3:30 pm

    Analytic, descriptive and prescriptive components of evolving Jazz:  A new model based on the works of Brad Mehldau

    Baynes-abstract.pdf

    Mark Baynes, SIT

    3:50 pm

    The inherent uncertainty of money: A Quantum game approach

    Botafogo-abstract.pdf

    Frederico Botafogo

    4:10pm

    The measurement problem: Beetles and cats in boxes

    Pace-abstract.pdf

    Barnaby Pace, SIT/OP

    Voting for best presentation for the Audience Choice Award: 4:30 pm

    Presentation to ‘Audience Choice Award’ winner and final remarks: 4:50 pm
    Dr Sally Bodkin-Allen, Research Manager, Southern Institute of Technology

    Winner of the Audience Choice Award was Jo Rhodes, with the Runners Up being Rebecca McDiarmid and Donna Burkett.

  • Mental Health Awareness Week 8-14 October (October 10 2018)

    Let nature in, strengthen your wellbeing – Mā te taiao kia whakapakari tōu oranga!

    WWW.MHAW.CO.NZ

     

    (Link to Mental Health Foundation, most of the ideas below come from this site) 

    Date Theme Ideas / Activities / Links

    Monday 8 October

     

    Connect

    Me whakawhanaunga

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources – enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    12noon – 12.50pm:  “Calming the Busy Overload – an Introduction to Mindfulness” with Heather Day, venue G205

     

    Connect with Papatūānuku – go barefoot, feel the earth under your feet

    Connect with Ranginui by lying on the earth and observe the sky above

    Organise a walk in nature

    Create things with you own hands – use natural material to make art

    Create a green space at home, at work

    Arrange to catch up with a friend or colleague over tea/coffee

    Ask a colleague how they are, then stop and wait for the answer

    Tuesday 9 October

     

    Keep learning

    Me ako tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    12noon – 1.00pm:  Enjoy a cup of tea made from healing herbs growing in our Living Campus Garden kindly ‘brewed’ by the Natural Resources Team

    • Learn how the traditional natural environment can help heal you

     

    Learn / share with others where you are from: your maunga/mountain, awa/river, whenua/land and marae 

    Share fun and interesting facts about traditional Māori places. Learn the te reo Māori names of mountains and river

    Learn the names of New Zealand’s native plants

    Listen to a TED Talk on something that inspires you.

    Wednesday 10 October

     

    Take notice

    Me aro tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    11.30am – 12.30pm:  Join Student Success in H127 for an informal chat  o A discussion about their roles o What Student Success is currently doing for the wellbeing of our learners o The initiatives they have in place o Future ideas and aspirations for wellbeing on campus

    12 noon: Cancelled due to forecast weather change -  Go for a walk with Heather Day to the Gardens - meet at the table in The Hub

    12.30 pm - 1.00 pm - Relaxation session in H601 - take some time out and allow yourself to relax with this guided focus and relaxation session with Heather Day

    Have an “email-consciousness” day – think before sending that email!!

    Wednesday is an unofficial email –consciousness day. So its`s OK to step back; have a break from emails; be mindful about that email you are about to send or open. Is there another way to communicate with a treasured colleague?  Phone calls are still in fashion and your colleagues will always appreciate a visit from you!

     

    Be inspired by the night sky

    Bring a native plant into your home or workplace

    Take notice of your senses in your environment: what can you smell, taste, hear, touch and see?

    Wear a bright colour and notice how that makes you feel.

     Thursday 11 October

     

    Be active

    Me kori tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

     

    Enjoy the fresh air and play!

    Join in a sport team and meet people

    Take a lunchtime class at Tapuae

    Bring activity into the everyday

    Take a whānau walk after dinner

    Drive into nature so she can give you sustenance!

    Friday 12 October

     

    Give

    Tukua

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

     

    Give your harvest / food you have grown to others

    Give your time, your words, your presence to others

    Prepare and share food together * Volunteer for an environment clean-up

    Produce less waste

    Give a smile, a compliment to your work colleagues or others whom you meet

    Buy a coffee and pay for two, a gift for someone who follows.

    Additional activities: 

    Mental Health Quiz Night, Open for all!

    October 16, 2018

    The Hub, 7.30pm

    Donations go the Mental Health Foundation

    Form a team with 5 -6 members and register now!

    To register, send your details and team name to Kathy Howard at HOWAKL1@student.op.ac.nz

    or go to OPSA to sign up.

  • Moodle Templates | Moodle Training Suite (August 21 2019)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Creator Series. The Creator Series is designed to provide guidance on how to build a course, administer a course and add, edit and use the wide range of resources and learning activities available in Moodle.

    This module will familiarise you with the Programme and Blended Course Templates so you can easily edit and modify them to meet learning and teaching requirements. 

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Modify a Moodle template to meet the learning and teaching requirements of the course
    • Edit a Moodle template to create a navigable learning environment

     

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 4 hours

     

    Customised training sessions are available for your team, whereby you tell us what you need and we'll customise a training session to meet your team's current needs. This can be useful for staff development days, or team meetings where you want to learn a new skill. Find out more about our Moodle Training Suite and how to request a customised training session.

  • Occupational Therapy Information Evenings 2019 (September 18 2018)
    • Do you want to make a difference in people’s lives?
    • Do you see yourself working in a community career where people come first?
    • Do you want to know more before you decide whether occupational therapy is the career for you?

     

    Come along to one of our 2019 Occupational Therapy information evenings.

    Occupational Therapists help people achieve independence, meaning and satisfaction in daily occupations. Come and learn about this diverse people oriented profession; hear from therapists about their work, from staff about the programme design and the things you will be involved in, and from students about what it’s like to be part of the programme. Students, parents and whanau are all welcome.

     

    Date: Tuesday 23 July or Tuesday 24 September 2019

    Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

    Location: Room G323, G Block, Corner of Harbour Terrace and Union Street (Map)

    Find out more about our programmes.

  • Course Administration Basics | Moodle Training Suite (July 30 2019)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Creator Series. The Creator Series is designed to provide guidance on how to build a course, administer a course and add, edit and use the wide range of resources and learning activities available in Moodle.

    This module will familiarise you with the administrative aspects for a course such as adding images and attributing them appropriately, adding, importing and duplicating activities and resources, adding and using editing tools, blocks and groups.

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Add and use images and resources appropriately in Moodle to create a course
    • Add and use blocks to administer a course
    • Add and use editing tools to create a course
    • Set up the gradebook to administer course assessments and marking workflow

     

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 5 hours

     

    Customised training sessions are available for your team, whereby you tell us what you need and we'll customise a training session to meet your team's current needs. This can be useful for staff development days, or team meetings where you want to learn a new skill. Find out more about our Moodle Training Suite and how to request a customised training session.

     

  • Copyright and Open Educational Resources | Moodle Training Suite (September 26 2018)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Start Up Series. The Start Up Series is designed to give you a foundational knowledge of Moodle before you embark on creating courses and course content.

    This module introduces you to some underlying principles around online learning and developing activities online, including Open Educational Resources (OERs), copyright, creative commons and attribution of resources.

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this online module you will be able to:

    • Identify when and how to apply copyright standards when creating Moodle courses
    • Identify and select creative common images appropriate for the end use
    • Search for OERs to help create Moodle courses

     

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 1.5 hours

News

  • Exhibition: David Green - Bodies in Time (July 3 2019)

    July 22 - 26, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, P BLOCK, RIEGO STREET (OFF ALBANY ST)

    David Green

    Bodies in Time

    EXHIBITION DATES: July 22 - 26, 2019
    EXHIBITION OPENING: Tuesday, July 23 2019  -  5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin
    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday  - 10am – 4pm

     

    Bodies feed desires and needs, move toward and away, with rehearsed precision and in free-form. Bodies breach. Bodies collude to create larger bodies, often in assertion against other bodies. Bodies want, and want again.

     

    David Green collects videos from the internet, digitally eviscerates them, and then recomposes their constituents into scattered assemblages. His video proposition investigates two modes of bodies in action – political and sexual – in two manners: choreographed and improvisational, using projected light to split each view five ways in the gallery space.

     

    “Considering the behaviors of bodies might help us begin to grasp our larger embodied predicament”, says Green.

     

    Bodies in Time distils, fragments, and redistributes images of performing bodies to model aspects of the creatures we present ourselves as, and perhaps are, in the inescapably bounded world that our bodies are overwhelming.

  • Student Testimonial: Sarvesh Kadam (December 4 2019)

     

    Moving to New Zealand was a major change for Sarvesh Kadam but he’s adapted to life here quickly.

    Sarvesh was born and raised in India and has spent most of his life in and around Bombay.

    “The only place I’ve been outside my hometown is New Zealand, so it’s quite an experience for me.”

    Sarvesh studied finance back in India and worked in research-based operations for about seven years. He decided he wanted to pursue further education then did a lot of research before deciding on New Zealand.

    “Everything I read about or heard about is very true.”

    He loves the weather here and the fact that Auckland is much quieter than cities in India.

    New Zealand’s education system has been a big change for him. He comes from an exam culture, but says he always knew about the self-learning approach of developed countries.

    “Experiencing it first-hand was a different ballgame altogether. The first assignment I was a headless chicken.”

    Sarvesh passed that assignment, but his results weren’t as good as he’d hoped.

    He began improving his performance thanks to a workshop offered by OPAIC’s Learning and Teaching Team, which he says was a real “stress-buster”. He also accessed help from the Learning Support Team.

    He polished his stress-management and pressure management soft skills during his first study block.

    “Being in the course taught me to understand what critical reading is, what critical analysis is.”

    Thanks to the collective efforts of staff at the polytechnic and his own proactive approach, he’s now exceeding his expectations.

    He was top of his class at our recent Excellent Scholar Awards.

    Sarvesh is now more than halfway through his programme and thinking about the future. He loves food and plans to use his finance background to find his way in the food industry after he graduates. Eventually he’d like to open his own café.

    He’ll use what he's learned at OPAIC, particularly in his Project Management and Marketing for a Digital Age courses to achieve his goals.

    Sarvesh says New Zealand is a land of opportunity.

    “It’s still developing. There’s so much to do. There’s so much creativity that you can impose on this market right now.”

  • Portage Ceramic Awards - Merit for (November 25 2019)

    Congratulations to Kylie Matheson - Merit Award in the 2019 Portage Ceramic Awards.

    Congratulations to all the other finalists and also to Blue Black who also received a Merit Award. See the link for the 19 finalists, whose work appears in the exhibition. https://www.teuru.org.nz/…/cal…/portage-ceramic-awards-2019/

    The Portage Ceramic Awards exhibition offers an annual update on the state of ceramic practices in New Zealand. Established in 2001, the awards are the country’s best-known showcase of current directions in the field, as well as future possibilities.

  • Dunedin School of Art & Dunedin Public Art Gallery welcome artist in residence Yona Lee (November 20 2019)

    The Dunedin School of Art has just welcomed our last Artist-in-Residence for 2019; Yona Lee. Lee is the Dunedin Public Art Gallery’s 2020 Aotearoa New Zealand Visiting Artist. She will spend the summer on residency at the Dunedin School of Art, from 18th November 2019 through to 23rd February 2020, culminating in an exhibition that opens at the DPAG on 21st February 2020. Yona will offer a special walk-through the exhibit for staff and students at 3.30pm that day just before the opening.

    She is best known for her large-scale site-specific sculptures and installations which share a language and materiality with urban infrastructure, merchandising displays and architectural design. This residency will provide time and space for research and development, allowing Lee to explore new ideas and experiments in the Jewellery and Sculpture studios. The Dunedin Public Art Gallery Visiting Artist Project is supported by Creative New Zealand Toi Aotearoa and the Dunedin School of Art.

  • ECC Student Design Awards - Congratulations to Susan Richardson, Graduate Diploma (November 18 2019)

    Congratulations to Susan Richardson, Graduate Diploma - Textiles who won the Fashion & Textiles Section of the ECC Student Design Awards in Wellington.

    (image: Susan Richardson, Molyneux Rediscovered, 2019, embroidered found object in response to lichen and the industrial past of Port Molyneux)

    Congratulations also to Hope Duncan who received a Highly Commended Award for Careful Where you Tread, a hand-tufted woollen rug.

    The top designs were shortlisted from entries received from tertiary students throughout New Zealand, in the annual edition of this design competition run by The Friends of the Dowse, People’s Choice Award.

    Since 1986 The Friends of The Dowse have offered their support to New Zealand tertiary students through an Award scheme designed to encourage innovation and creativity specifically in the areas of design and craft. The annual ECC NZ Student Craft/Design Awards are open to all students who are currently enrolled to study in 2019 or who have completed their studies in 2018. 

  • (November 14 2019)

    The latest issue of staff newsletter AIC Way is out now. Check your inbox for your copy or read it online here.

  • New artwork at Te Pā Tauira entrance by Scott Eady (November 12 2019)

    A new sculpture graces the entranceway to Te Pā Tauira (The Student Village). 

    Created by Scott Eady, Senior Lecturer (College of Art, Design and Architecture), the artwork, Matou Ahau (We Me), represents the learner journey that is at once both individual and part of a community. 

    Scott says the artwork went through a lengthy development process.

    “Thinking about one’s practice as being formed and informed by others. I made a drawing where the words ME and WE were repeated hundreds of times,” he says.

    “On top of the entrance bulkhead the words NAU MAI HAERE MAI will illuminate from pounamu green coloured neon which at night time will illuminate the stainless steel forms.

    “The pairing of Māori with English words an honouring of Aotearoa New Zealand’s bicultural Treaty of Waitangi partnership. The use of these words came from a discussion with Simon Kaan.

    “Also present in the work is the notion of education as a journey – "ara honohono" – the concept presented by Otakou Runaka representative Tahu Potiki in consultation with Professor Emeritus Khyla Russell.

    “As people pass between the words either entering or exiting Te Pa Tauira, an image of self is reflected for just a moment on both the words ME and WE simultaneously.

    "At Otago Polytechnic students and staff are on both an individual learning journey and part of a greater learning community.”

    Edward Ellison, Philip Cullen, Scott Eady and Bridie Lonie spoke at the event. The artwork was sponsored by Otago Polytechnic, Naylor Love and Logic Group. 

  • Climate Safe House moved to Waitati site (November 5 2019)

    The Climate Safe House, which took shape at the Home and Living Show at Forsyth Barr Stadium, Dunedin, at the weekend, has been trucked to a site in Waitati.

    The brainchild of the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust, and a result of a partnership with Otago Polytechnic, the 60m2, one-bedroom eco-friendly, solar-powered house has been largely built with Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) provided by Formance.

    The Climate Safe House will provide a warm, efficient, elevated and transportable home for a Blueskin community member whose home has been rendered unliveable by repeated flooding.

    The mainly female contingent involved in the project highlights Otago Polytechnic’s push to get more women into trades and construction programmes.

    “Dunedin is entering a building boom and requires a large and diverse pool of tradespeople to draw from,” Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker says.

    Forget about construction being an industry that requires only strength and brawn. The construction sector needs a range of other skills, too – many transferable from other industries.

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

    Change the balance

     

  • Occupational Therapy students organise obstacle course fundraiser (November 4 2019)

    Two Otago Polytechnic Occupational Therapy students have organised an adventure obstacle course race with the aim of raising funds to support a form of rehabilitation for children and adults who have motor disorders of neurological origin.

    As part of Conductive Education Awareness Week (which runs from 4-10 November), Jocelyn Helm and Ruby Dunbar are collaborating with Conductive Education Otago, running an obstacle course race at Logan Park on Sunday, 10 November.

    “The aim of this event is to raise awareness and funds for Conductive Education Otago,” Jocelyn, a year-3 Occupational Therapy student at Otago Polytechnic, says.

    “It is also about providing an opportunity for everyone, including clients, to get active and have fun in the outdoors. This is an opportunity that some of these clients might not often have.”

    The duo are hoping to attract a number of teams, comprising six people per team. Each team will engage with a client from Conductive Education Otago, helping them through the obstacle course race as well as participating themselves.

    Some of the obstacles will include climbing over hay bales, crawling through a large pipe and stepping through tyres.

    “We are also after a number of volunteers who can act as timekeepers at each obstacle, as well as volunteers who can help set up and pack up on the day. Any help would be greatly appreciated,” Ruby, a year-3 Occupational Therapy student, says.

    Team registration is $100. For more information, contact helmjr1@student.op.ac.nz

    Read more about our Occupational Therapy programmes

     

  • Jewellery Collaborative Project wins People's Choice Award, Melbourne (November 4 2019)

    Congratulations to members of the CLINK collaborative Jewellery Project. Clinkproject6 has won the Radiant Pavilion People's Choice Award, 2019.

    For the last five years students and staff from Dunedin School of Art  and Hungry Creek School of Art & Craft have worked collaboratively under the title CLINKproject. The output has been pop-up or intervention-flavoured jewellery exhibits in Auckland locations. This year they crossed the Tasman to Melbourne and align their project with Radiant Pavillion at the Grainger Museum within the University of Melbourne. 

    Radiant Pavilion is a celebration of the many aspects of contemporary jewellery and object practice. Open to local, national and international artists at any stage of their career, the event brings makers, wearers, galleries, collectors, curators, theorists and the public together in a week of investigation, collaboration and exchange.

  • Digital Media & Design Exhibition (October 30 2019)

    Marvel at the impressive display of graphic design work, animation and laser cut objects designed and produced by our Digital Media & Design students.

     

    2 DECEMBER - 6 DECEMBER

    H Block, 3rd Floor, Forth Street

     

    OPENING
    Monday 2 December from 5.30pm –7.30pm

    SHOWCASE

    Tuesday 3 December - Friday 6 December,
    11.00am –3.00pm

     

     

    Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • SITE 2019 / Dunedin School of Art Final Year Exhibition (October 29 2019)

    Each year, Dunedin School of Art opens its doors to the public to showcase works by our emerging artists. An unmissable contemporary art experience, at SITE you can converse with the artists, purchase an original work of art, or just admire the collection of paintings, prints, photography, jewellery, electronic arts, ceramics and sculptures on display.

     

    23-28 NOV,
    DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART,
    RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

     

    OPENING

    Friday 22 November, 6.00pm – 8.00pm

    EXHIBITION

    Saturday 23 November 10.00am – 4.00pm

    CLOSED: Sunday 24 November

    Monday 25 November 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    Tuesday 26 November 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    Wednesday 27 November 12.00pm – 4.00pm

    Thursday 28 November 12.00pm – 8pm (late night)

    (cover: artwork image by Siau-Jiun Lim)

     

    Site extraworks v2Student showcase  banner950

     

     

  • Dunedin School of Art Nightclass Annual Exhibition (October 29 2019)

    4-8 NOV, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY

     

    Venue: Dunedin School of Art Gallery

    Exhibition Dates: November 4 - 8

    Exhibition Opening: Monday 4th November 5.30pm

     

    Family and friends of nightclass students are invited to this annual celebration of the nightclass art community. All welcome.

     

    Image: Marie Strauss, 'The Dream Stealer' (detail), lino cut on Arches paper.

  • Undergraduate Exhibitions - End of year Showcases around town (October 29 2019)

    8 November

     

    Fruition

    Date: Friday, 8 November

    Venue: Underground Market Dunedin

    A showcase of the art produced by the BVA Photography second year class. Works featured are many and varied in scale, medium, and style, all with their own unique story to tell yet connected through themes of identity and self. Come and see the fruit of these young artist's months of work!

     

    Second Coat

    Date: Friday, 8 November

    Venue: Robert Piggott Art Gallery

    Dunedin School of Art, Second year painting students group exhibition.

     

    Photographic Media Arts

    Date: Friday 1 - 7 November

    Venue: Otago Polytechnic Hub

    Opening: 5.30 PM on Friday 1 November

     

    Quintet

    Date: Wednesday 13 - 16 November

    Venue: Kate watts Gallery, 201 North Road

    Opening: Monday 11 November, 5-7PM

     

     

  • Wildlife Hospital's good work about to hit big screen (October 21 2019)

    A television series focusing on all the great work that goes on at the Wildlife Hospital Dunedin will make its world premiere at the Regent Theatre on Sunday 10 November.

    Award-winning company Natural History New Zealand’s five-part documentary series, Wildlife Rescue, follows the dedicated veterinary team, who help safeguard New Zealand’s native species through rescue, rehabilitation and research.

    The Wildlife Hospital, which opened in January 2018, receives financial and other support from Otago Polytechnic. Significantly, the hospital operates out of Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing.

    “Not only does the hospital save precious wildlife, it also provides great learning opportunities for our students, reinforcing our leadership in veterinarian nursing education,” Phil Ker, Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive, says.

    The Regent Theatre event features a screening of Episode 1 along with snippets from subsequent episodes of Wildlife Rescue, which will be aired on Choice TV on 17 November.

    The Regent Theatre event will also provide an opportunity to hear briefly from the Wildlife Hospital Trust, the NHNZ team and to meet some of the stars from the show, including Dr Lisa Argilla, one of New Zealand’s best-known wildlife veterinary surgeons, who runs the hospital alongside accomplished wildlife veterinary nurse Angelina Martelli.

    Since the Wildlife Hospital since it opened its doors in January 2018, it has become the busiest wildlife veterinary facility in New Zealand, treating around 500 animals (more than 50 different native species) per year.

    Read more about our Veterinary Nursing programmes

  • Kalisolaite ‘Uhila - Dunedin Public Art Gallery Visiting Artist  (October 21 2019)

    THURS 24 OCT, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Kalisolaite ‘Uhila
    Dunedin Public Art Gallery Visiting Artist 

    Kalisolaite achieved his Bachelor of Visual Arts from Auckland University of Technology, Auckland in 2010.  Just one year after graduating, he earned the Visual Arts Award for his work Pigs In The Yard at The Auckland Fringe 2011 Awards.  In 2013 Kalisolaite received the Iris Fisher Scholarship from Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts, Pakuranga while studying for his Postgraduate Diploma in Dance from the University of Auckland; awarded annually to assist postgraduate art students with promising and visionary (http://www.tautai.org/artist/kalisolaite-uhila/)

    DPAG NZ visiting artist Kalisolaite Uhila will present a number of performances while in Dunedin, including a durational drumming performance that will extend across 80 days, based in the BNZ gallery on the ground floor of DPAG.  Paying reference to various histories and ancestories Kalisolaite ‘Uhila’s performance work is also receptive to the every day and the multiplicities of being.

  • Call for Project 2020: ART + EARTH (October 16 2019)

    CALL FOR PROJECT

    An Invitation to Artists and Scientists

     

    Scientists and artists (post-graduate alumni and staff of the Dunedin School of Art)
    are invited to take part in the latest Art and Science Project: Art + Earth.

    The eighth Art and Science project takes “earth science” as its focus. According to The Oxford Companion to the Earth, the earth sciences encompass fields of enquiry from “volcanoes to flood plains, diamonds to meteors, deserts to deep seas.” [i] The disciplines involved include geology, climatology, mineralogy, and oceanography and opportunities extend from mapping the features of the third rock from the sun to journeys to the centre of the earth. Artists and scientists alike have always used drawing and model making as tools to understand how “nature” works. Field records are fascinating to artists who share common ground in the arts of discovery through observing, recording and representing what goes on beneath our feet, above us and around us. .

    The earth sciences explore the formation of rocks, as they are layered across geologic time, under restless pressures, ruptures and constant change. They engage with the macro and the micro, with chaos and order. And then there is the place of the human. How has our planet made us? How have the connections between earth systems affected evolution throughout deep time, and changed the course of histories and cultures? Our attempts to visualise the world around us shape our culture. Our modes of understanding shape our common future.

    Following in the footsteps of successful Art and Science Projects over the previous seven years, artists will work with scientists from the University of Otago and beyond, individually or in small groups, to develop artworks which respond to the theme of “earth science” interpreted in a broad context.

    Works will be selected for an exhibition to be held in the first week of July 2020 at the Otago Museum. The exhibition will coincide with the New Zealand International Science Festival.

    The project will be administered by the Art+Science team including Pam McKinlay from the Dunedin School of Art, Dr Jenny Rock, Science Communication and Dr Bryce Peebles, Marine Science from the University of Otago.

     

    Expressions of interest are welcome. First meeting Wednesday 20 November, 2019:

    Please register your interest as soon as possible with Jenny Rock jenny.rock@otago.ac.nz, Bryce Peebles bryce.peebles@gmail.com  and Pam McKinlay pam.mckinlay@op.ac.nz.

    As in other years the project will commence with an introductory evening of presentations in November of this year (date and venue TBC) followed by monthly meetings February to May 2020. This year will we will have a longer first meeting to cover the presentations of both artists and scientists, in the “speed-dating” phase of the project.

    If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask Pam McKinlay, pam.mckinlay@op.ac.nz or  Jenny Rock jrockmail@gmail.com.

    __________________

    [i] Hancock and Skinner, 2003, The Oxford Companion to the Earth

    (Image credit for banner image - Map of Zealandia by Nic Mortimer et al, read more here

    https://www.geosociety.org//gsatoday/archive/27/3/article/GSATG321A.1.htm)


    Co-cordinators:

    Pam McKinlay is an artist with a background in applied science and history of art. As an artist she works predominantly in sculpture, weaving and ceramics. She works in collaboration with other artists locally and nationally in community outreach and education projects around the theme of climate change, sustainability and biodiversity. Currently she works at the Dunedin School of Art.
    Pam McKinlay, Dunedin School of Art
    Pam.McKinlay@op.ac.nz

    Jenny Rock has backgrounds in science and art. She has spent > 20 years as a scientific researcher (particularly in marine biology) and is an intaglio and relief printmaker, as well as occasional poet. Currently she is a Sr Lecturer in Science Communication (University of Otago) focusing on aesthetics, participatory practice, sensory cognition, and ArtScience.Jenny Rock, Otago University
    jrockmail@gmail.com

    Bryce Peebles earned his PhD in Marine Science in 2017. He studies biomineralisation and the taphonomy of molluscs. He is a casual research assistant in the Marine Science and Zoology departments at the University of Otago. He enjoys cooking and is an avid historical and classical fencer.
    Bryce Peebles, Otago University
    bryce.peebles@gmail.com

     

  • Public Seminar: Photographers Rachel Allan and Alex Lovell-Smith - Code & silver (October 8 2019)
    THURS 17 OCT, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN
     
    Rachel Allan and Alex Lovell-Smith
    Code & silver
     
    As graduates of Dunedin School of Art, Alex Lovell-Smith and Rachel Hope Allan find themselves working between multiple digital media and analogue processes. In this seminar they will discuss the intersections and overlaps in their photographic practices. Both share a passion for the darkroom and the alchemical and arcane process of film and silver salts and mix these techniques with contemporary technology, digital media and the changing photographic landscape.
     
    Lovell-Smith and Allan are Lecturers in Photography and Electronic Arts at the Dunedin School of Art. Both are independent practitioners, researching and experimenting in a range of photographic and (unhol) mixture of image making systems.
  • Public Exhibition: Mark Braunias - Working on a Guru (October 8 2019)

    14 OCT - 1 NOV, 2019, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, P BLOCK, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN.

    Mark Braunias
    Working on a Guru - (A Pictorial Procession)

    EXHIBITION DATES: 14 Oct - 1 Nov, 2019

    EXHIBITION OPENING: Friday 18 October 5 – 7pm

    VENUE: Dunedin School of Art Gallery, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

     

  • Learner wins national women’s construction award (October 2 2019)

    Anna Winskill-Moore’s decision “to bite the bullet” and embark on a career in the building industry has led to her winning a national women’s construction award.

    Anna was named joint winner of the Student/Apprentice Excellence Award at the National Association of Women in Construction Excellence Awards at a gala event in Auckland on Friday 27 September.

    The Student/Apprentice Excellence Award celebrates “female students/apprentices who show lots of potential and commitment to the industry”. Anna shared the award with Danielle Platt, a quantity surveyor from Christchurch.

    Anna, who recently completed the New Zealand Certificate in Construction Trade Skills at Otago Polytechnic, is employed as a building apprentice with Osborn Brothers Building and Construction Ltd.

    “The prospect of turning 40 while being in a job I didn’t love helped fuel the drive to make the change to construction,” Anna says. “I felt if I didn’t do it, I probably never would, so I bit the bullet and jumped.

    “Being a mature female student/apprentice in construction is not common.

    “I am proud of the life change I have made, as the desire to be a carpenter/builder has always sat in the background.

    “I think I’m most proud that I haven’t let societal attitudes and expectations hold me back from pursuing a career in construction.”

    As part of her ITAB apprenticeship, Anna is now enrolled in the New Zealand Certificate in Carpentry at Otago Polytechnic.

    “I am currently attending a series of theory night classes for this, and in the third year of my apprenticeship I will have some block courses to attend.”

    Anna has some words of advice for other women contemplating getting into the construction industry:

    “Be prepared for the mental and physical challenges it brings; have a goal or purpose to work towards; be persistent and courageous but also patient; and – possibly the most important thing – keep a sense of humour.”

    Fellow apprentice Kirsty Currie, who is about to complete her second year for Dunedin firm Beelee Homes Ltd, was also named a finalist in the Student/Apprentice Excellence section.

    Kirsty, who completed the New Zealand Certificate in Carpentry (Level 4) at Otago Polytechnic and now works for Beelee Homes Ltd, also attended the NAWIC Awards ceremony.

    “I feel very privileged and honoured to be selected as a finalist,” says Kirsty.

    “The opportunities that I have been given to date have been great and I’m so thankful for that. I am constantly learning on a daily basis.

    “My apprenticeship involves completing modules, but I have also been fortunate enough to become a peer tutor for other apprentices in the programme and am helping them with literacy.”

    And Kirsty has some words of advice to other women contemplating getting into construction industry:

    “Just do it! It doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from, or what gender you are. I am living my dream and others can, too!”

    The NAWIC Excellence Awards, held in partnership with BCITO, recognised a wide range of skills, from managing directors to apprentices.

    NAWIC President Jenny Parker: “Every one of these women is remarkable. They’re succeeding in what has been a man’s world for so long, and doing a wonderful job. We also acknowledge and respect the men who are helping us to change this.”

    Footnote: Anna Winskill-Moore is also involved in helping build a “Climate Safe House”.

    The brainchild of the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust, and a result of a partnership with Otago Polytechnic, the 60m2 eco-friendly, solar-powered, one-bedroom house is to be largely built using Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) provided by Formance.

    The Climate Safe House will be assembled at the Home and Living Show at Forsyth Barr Stadium on 2-3 November before being moved and eventually completed at a Waitati site.

    The project aims to tackle the challenges of climate change as well as showcase innovative technologies in building and the opportunities New Zealand has to build future-focused, cost-effective housing.

    Learn more about our Construction programmes

     

  • Bike Fix It Clinic (September 30 2019)

    Free Bike Fix It Clinic!

    Need a tune up?
    Come by Tuesday 1 October from 11.00am to 1.30pm!

    This will be the last clinic of the year.

  • Learner Awards 2019 nominations are now open! (September 30 2019)

    Nominations are open for 2019 Student Awards

    • Otago Daily Times for personal achievement in OP studies
    • OP Education Foundation for outstanding achievement in exceptional circumstances
    • OP Education Foundation for excellence in a field of study

    To nominate your peers/learners, please click here.

  • Free massages for mental health (September 19 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Massage Therapy staff and students are offering free massages as part of Mental Health Awareness Week (23-29 September).

    Research indicates that massage increases “happiness hormones” (oxytocin and serotonin) and decreases “stress hormones” (norepinephrine and cortisol).  Elevated levels of stress hormones have been linked to anxiety, depression, chronic pain, high blood pressure, digestive trouble, immunosuppression and autoimmune conditions. 

    “While massage can’t be considered a treatment for most of these conditions, regular massage can reduce our stress levels, so could be considered a preventative measure,” says David McQuillan, Senior Lecturer, Massage Therapy, Otago Polytechnic.

    “Serotonin not only helps improve mood but also aids digestion, memory and sleep; oxytocin helps us to feel less stressed, more empathetic and helps to support healthy relationships.” 

    As part of Mental Health Awareness Week, Otago Polytechnic Massage Therapy students will also offer free massages (between 3pm-4.30pm) at the Fiveways expo at the Octagon Club on Friday, 27 September.

    Otago Polytechnic’s student massage clinic has a limited number of appointment times on Wednesday 25 September. To book an appointment, email david.mcquillan@op.ac.nz, stating your name, cell phone, and reasons for wanting to receive a massage for mental health. This information will be strictly confidential.

    Read more about our Massage Therapy programme

     

    e signature te reo

  • Public Seminar - Leoni Schmidt Venice 2019: May you live in interesting times (September 17 2019)

    THURS 26 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Leoni Schmidt
    Venice 2019: May you live in interesting times

    This seminar shares the presenter's recent experiences of the Venice Biennale 2019. Violent Rages, Tragedies of Loss, Wry Humour, and Apocalyptic Cacophonies are some of the registers of contemporary practice exhibited this year by more than 90 countries and thousands of artists 116 years after the advent of this international showcase for the visual arts. 

    Dr. Leoni Schmidt is the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic in Dunedin and Auckland, New Zealand. She is a full professor in the Dunedin School of Art at the same institution. 

  • PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM - ANIMALS AT THE EDGE (September 17 2019)

    FRIDAY 27 SEP, 9am-5pm, LECTURE ROOM P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Animals at the Edge

    A Public Symposium

    Speakers include: Bridie Lonie, Kari Schmidt, Jim Fyfe, Hiltrun Ratz, Emma Burns, Michele Beevors, Adrian Hall, Rachel Allan, David Green, Irena Kennedy, Rohanna Weaver, Madison Kelly, Tori Clearwater, and Elaine Mitchell.

     

  • Art lecturer collaborates with Dunedin Dream Brokerage (September 17 2019)

    Described as a “love song to Aotearoa’s rivers, wetlands, foreshore, and seabed”, an Otago Polytechnic lecturer’s light-filled vision will emanate from a Dunedin shop front in the latest installation organised by Dunedin Dream Brokerage.

    Time and Tide, by David Green, a lecturer at Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art, opens on Thursday 19 September in a vacant store on George St, between Hanover and Frederick streets.

    The installation, which will be turned on between 6pm-10pm, runs until 29 September.

    David says Time and Tide is a celebration of the waters that surround Dunedin, adding: “Water is a shapeshifter whose migration knows no boundary.”

    Bringing David’s vision to life, five light projectors will play footage of gentle tidal scenes on to the walls of the space, the colours spilling beyond the shop’s front window and on to the path outside.

    Dunedin Dream Brokerage has delivered 35 unique events since its launch (as Urban Dream Brokerage) in 2015, and aims to activate the city’s under-utilised buildings through a lively and diverse programme.

    “Property owners work with us to re-invigorate the city centre. By bringing temporary life to a vacant property and showing its potential, they increase its chances of being tenanted,” explains Kate Schrader, of Dunedin Dream Brokerage.

    “We are really pleased to be working with David once again, after our last collaboration, 1954, in 2017.

    “We can't wait to see how the community responds to this beautiful temporary installation, which gently nudges us to contemplate the waters around us in the heart of the CBD.”

    Dunedin Dream Brokerage is funded by Ara Toi Ōtepoti, the Dunedin City Council’s Arts and Culture Strategy, with support from the Otago Chamber of Commerce and Otago Polytechnic.

     

  • Public Seminar: Mark Braunias - Messing about in studios  (September 16 2019)

    THURS 19 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Mark Braunias
    Messing about in studios
     

    Mark Braunias is a New Zealand based artist who has exhibited extensively over the past 30 years. He graduated with a BFA from Canterbury University, Ilam School of Fine Arts, Christchurch in 1988. Mark Braunias was the inaugural winner of the James Wallace Art Award in 1992 and received a Wallace/Fulbright scholarship to complete an artist residency at Headlands Center For The Arts in San Francisco during 2011. Braunias has also completed artist residencies at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery (2002), William Hodges Fellowship, Invercargill (2005), and Tylee Cottage, Whanganui (2007). He has appeared in curated public gallery exhibitions including A very peculiar practice (City Gallery, Wellington, 1995), Gruesome (Robert McDougal Art Gallery, Christchurch, 1999), The Cartoon Show (Auckland Art Gallery, 2002) and Field of Vision: A survey of Mark Braunias (Wallace Arts Centre, Auckland, 2016) and also exhibited work at Sydney Contemporary Art Fair (2015) and Hong Kong Central  Art Fair (2015) in association with Bath Street Gallery.

    Braunias has published a number of art catalogues including Praha (1992),  Gank (2001),  A Day In My Life (2003),  My New Art God  (2004),  Congo (2006), Waterfront Industry Commission Report  (2006),  London Town (2008) and Encyclo-Dimensional (2015). His work is held in public gallery and private collections including : Te Papa Museum, Christchurch Art Gallery, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Sarjeant Art Gallery, Tauranga Art Gallery, Invercargill Art Gallery and Museum, Ashburton Art Gallery, Auckland University, Canterbury University, Lincoln University, Fletcher Trust Collection, Wallace Arts Trust and the State Library Of Queensland. www.markbraunias.com

  • Public Exhibition: Tom Fox - Altered Neuro States (September 11 2019)

    23 - 26 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street), DUNEDIN 

    Tom Fox

    Altered Neuro States


    EXHIBITION DATES: 23-26 September 2019

    OPENING: Monday 23 September, 5 – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block Riego Street (off Albany St) Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

     

  • Public Seminar: Grace Lai talks about BAGS (September 11 2019)

    THURS 12 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Grace Lai
    Carried Away: Bags Unpacked

    The bag, and the handbag in particular, has achieved high fashion status, but what's the cultural and historical significance behind the bag? Why do we use them and not just have pockets? Why don't men routinely use them? Does every culture have a tradition of using bags? The Auckland Museum exhibition Carried Away: Bags Unpacked is a collection of 150 bags from their Applied Arts and Design Collection, a nationally significant research archive of key makers and designers from New Zealand and abroad, and this book serves as both a photographic record and an exploration of the symbolism and power behind bags.

    Grace Lai, curator of the collection unpacks issues carried by the bag: of colonialism, the economy, consumption, gender politics, and whakapapa. Issues that remain relevant to not only museums and their collections but also to society today. Guided by a curiosity for the stories told by objects that are overlooked or dismissed, Grace Lai is interested in seeking out the webs of connections between material and immaterial culture. This philosophy was developed during her time as an Alphawood Scholar at SOAS University of London. Today, Grace is an art historian and curator at Auckland Museum, where she leads he exhibition, curation, and development of the Applied Arts and Design Collection. Currently, her research is focused on expanding the collection and discourse of contemporary New Zealand practitioners – which has seen her get carried away by bags.

  • Success Story: Olha Viazenko (September 11 2019)

    It was winter in Kyiv - minus 10 degrees and snowing - when Olha Viazenko decided to attend a workshop on studying abroad.

    There she and her husband watched a presentation with beautiful photos of New Zealand’s landscapes and outdoor recreational opportunities. They decided almost immediately to make the move here.

    Olha has worked as a journalist and a lawyer in Ukraine. She's also led an international relations organisation where she undertook media projects with cultural societies and embassies all over the world.

    She knew she needed to practice her English and learn more about management to be able to excel in her industry, so the Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Management at OPAIC was a good fit for her.

    Olha has recently completed the qualification. She says it was great to be a student again but also challenging balancing study with family and other responsibilities.

    On top of her study she was very involved in extracurricular activities. Olha was a student ambassador, a police ambassador and helped at graduations, orientations, and other student and charity events.

    “Volunteering in New Zealand is very, very popular,” she says. 

    It’s a way to communicate, find new interests, and meet new people, according to Olha.

    “It’s really great, because you feel that you can do something for other people.”

    She worked as a kitchenhand as an evening job while completing her qualification. It was a flexible job that allowed her to study and volunteer during the day.

    She’s also working on a project for New Zealand media about a bad period in Ukrainian history – Holodomor, when nearly 10 million people died of hunger.

    Olha says New Zealand is very different from her home country. It is smaller than she initially expected but friendly and relaxed.

     “New Zealand – it’s a big village, but it’s very nice.”

    She came here with her husband, who works, and her daughter who is in high school.

    “Now we love New Zealand. We love the ocean. Each weekend we try to go to the ocean.”

  • All-women group of tradies to build “Climate Safe House" (September 14 2019)

    An all-women group of tradies will help the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust build a “Climate Safe House” at the Home and Living Show, to be held at Forsyth Barr Stadium on 2-3 November.

    The house is the brainchild of the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust, and is a result of a partnership with Otago Polytechnic.

    The Climate Safe House will be assembled at Forsyth Barr Stadium before being moved and eventually completed at a Waitati site.

    The 60m2, one-bedroom eco-friendly home will be solar-powered and built from heavily-insulated panels provided by sponsor Formance.

    The project aims to tackle the challenges of climate change as well as showcase innovative technologies in building and the opportunities New Zealand has to build future-focused, cost-effective housing, says Scott Willis, of Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust.

    “The Climate Safe House project's goal is to develop housing for coastal areas vulnerable to climate change and to implement adaptive planning in practice.

    “I’m excited about the opportunity to get creative with new materials to construct a high-performance, affordable and adaptable model house that will provide shelter to someone in need.”

    The Climate Safe House will provide a warm, efficient, elevated and transportable home for a Blueskin community member whose home has been rendered unliveable by repeated flooding.

    The Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust is leasing the property in order to build the house and will sub-let the house to the property owner at a peppercorn rental, removing it when flooding becomes too extreme. The community is taking responsibility for adaptation.

    The group of women tradies will largely comprise a mix of Otago Polytechnic learners and graduates. In addition there will be student projects focused on filming the construction, creating the storyboard and graphics, as well as native plantings on site at Waitati.

    Their presence at the Home and Living Show will highlight Otago Polytechnic’s wide range of trades and construction programmes – particularly building, electrical, and plumbing (the latter will be offered from 2020). 

    “Dunedin is entering a building boom and requires a large and diverse pool of tradespeople to draw from,” Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker says.

    “We hope that by using an all-women team, we will help encourage other women to enter the trades.

    “Otago Polytechnic is pleased to be partnering with the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust on this important sustainability project,” Ker says.

    “We hope it will raise awareness, not only about climate change issues, but also the positive actions which can be taken to help make a better world.”

    Terry Davies, CEO Dunedin Venues, says he and his team are thrilled to host the Climate Safe House project during the Home and Living Show at Forsyth Barr Stadium. 

    “This is a great community project and it’s been terrific working with all of the partners. We’re pleased to be able to support the initiative with the provision of space at the Home and Living Show and look forward to see it all come to fruition on 2 and 3 November.”

    Read the ODT article

    Read Scott Willis' Otago Daily Times column

    Find out more about BRCT’s projects

  • Apprentices reach finals of national women’s construction awards (September 11 2019)

    Two apprentices enrolled in Otago Polytechnic building programmes are finalists for a national women’s construction award.

    Anna Winskill-Moore and Kirsty Currie both plan to attend National Association of Women in Construction Excellence Awards event in Auckland on Friday 27 September.

    Anna, who recently completed the New Zealand Certificate in Construction Trade Skills at Otago Polytechnic, is employed as a building apprentice with Osborn Brothers Building and Construction Ltd.

    “I started with them as soon as I finished my course this year,” says Anna.

    “I’ll get to talk to and learn from others in the industry.”

    Anna says her inclusion as a finalist in the Student or Apprentice Excellence section has given her boost of encouragement.

    “Being a mature female student/apprentice in construction is not common.

    “I am proud of the life change I have made, as the desire to be a carpenter/builder has always sat in the background. I think I’m most proud that I haven’t let societal attitudes and expectations hold me back from pursuing a career in construction.

    “The prospect of turning 40 while being in a job I didn’t love helped fuel the drive to make the change to construction. I felt if I didn’t do it now, I probably never would, so I bit the bullet and jumped.

    “As part of the year-long programme at Otago Polytechnic, we had to find ourselves work experience placements, so I made a point of asking companies if there was potential for them to take on an apprentice. This was in an effort to increase my chances of having an apprenticeship to go to at the end of the course, and that worked out for me.”

    As part of her ITAB apprenticeship, Anna is now enrolled in the New Zealand Certificate in Carpentry at Otago Polytechnic.

    “I am currently attending a series of theory night classes for this, and in the third year of my apprenticeship I will have some block courses to attend.”

    Anna has some words of advice for other women contemplating getting into the construction industry:

    “Be prepared for the mental and physical challenges it brings; have a goal or purpose to work towards; be persistent and courageous but also patient; and – possibly the most important thing – keep a sense of humour.”

    Meanwhile, Kirsty Currie is about to complete her second year as an apprentice for Dunedin firm Beelee Homes Ltd.

    Kirsty, who completed the New Zealand Certificate in Carpentry (Level 4) at Otago Polytechnic, admits she was a bit “shocked” when told she’d reached the finals of the NAWIC Awards.

    “I feel very privileged and honoured to be selected as I finalist,” says Kirsty, who also plans to attend the awards ceremony.

    “The opportunities that I have been given to date have been great and I’m so thankful for that. I am constantly learning on a daily basis.

    “My apprenticeship involves completing modules, but I have also been fortunate enough to become a peer tutor for other apprentices in the programme and am helping them with literacy.”

    And Kirsty has some words of advice to other women contemplating getting into construction industry:

    “Just do it! It doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from, or what gender you are. I am living my dream and others can, too!”

    Kirsty’s boss, Grant Beel, says she has been an “amazing” find.

    “I haven’t had an apprentice like her. Kirsty has this real thirst to learn. From her first day on the job, she was hungry for knowledge.

    “No one walks on site without Kirsty asking them something.”

    Read more about our Construction programmes

  • Public Exhibition: Topographies by Kate Watts (September 6 2019)

    16-19 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street), DUNEDIN

     

    Kate Watts

    Topographies

    EXHIBITION DATES: 16 - 19 September 2019

    OPENING: Monday 16 September, 5 – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY:  Ground Floor, P Block Riego Street (off Albany St) Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

  • Otago Polytechnic supports the Strike 4 Climate (September 4 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic staff and students will participate in the Strike 4 Climate on Friday 27 September.

    Climate strike organisers have asked individuals and organisations to join with school students in making their voices heard on the issue – and Otago Polytechnic has risen to the challenge.

    Chief Executive Phil Ker says that supporting the cause is a no-brainer.

    “Otago Polytechnic’s vision is that our people make a better world – and doing our part to fight to curb the practices that lead to climate change is a vital aspect of this vision.”

    “Sustainability is a key value at Otago Polytechnic. We have embedded the concept of sustainable practice through both our curriculum development and campus development over the past decade; we are a member of the Climate Leaders Coalition; and we have a wide range of strong environmental partnerships.”

    Otago Polytechnic is leading the charge to establish a United Nations Centre of Expertise for Sustainability in Otago – RCE Otago – which will focus on the following issues, all aligned to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

    • Quality education
    • Water quality, availability, use and efficiency
    • Sustainable Tourism
    • Sustainable cities and towns
    • Partnerships and collaboration

    Otago Polytechnic staff and students are encouraged to congregate in The Quad (outside The Hub) from 11am on Friday 27 September. From there, they will walk up to the University’s Union Lawn and march into The Octagon with university students.

    Otago Polytechnic Student Association President Nathan Laurie says he is excited to see tertiary students and staff band together to make a stand against the factors that contribute to climate change.

    “As students we’re trying to build our futures – but right now it seems like we’re building on shaky ground. It’s encouraging to have the support of Otago Polytechnic’s leadership team and staff as we fight for a better future.”

    Sustainability at OP

    Otago Polytechnic leads and supports a wide range of sustainability initiatives.

    • Our students have the opportunity to do sustainability related projects in many of our programmes, and are currently working on projects that include sustainable fashion, soft plastics recycling, electric vehicle servicing and large-scale composting
    • Otago Polytechnic is Fair Trade-accredited
    • We are a partner of Predator Free Dunedin
    • We host Dunedin’s Wildlife Hospital
    • Our Eden Café is a recognised leader in waste minimisation
    • Our Te Pā Tauira Student Village won a Green Building Excellence award
    • We support community initiatives such as WasteJam
    • Our students have the opportunity to undertake innovative learning such as Bachelor of Leadership for Change
    • We have electric cars and shared bicycles on our fleet
    • We have been nominated for two 2019 Green Gown Awards

    Visit our website for more information.

    Image: Flickr 

  • Public Seminar: Grace Lai Carried Away - Everything Bags (September 3 2019)

    THURS 12 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Grace Lai
    Carried Away: Bags Unpacked

    The bag, and the handbag in particular, has achieved high fashion status, but what's the cultural and historical significance behind the bag? Why do we use them and not just have pockets? Why don't men routinely use them? Does every culture have a tradition of using bags? The Auckland Museum exhibition Carried Away: Bags Unpacked is a collection of 150 bags from their Applied Arts and Design Collection, a nationally significant research archive of key makers and designers from New Zealand and abroad, and this book serves as both a photographic record and an exploration of the symbolism and power behind bags.

    Grace Lai, curator of the collection unpacks issues carried by the bag: of colonialism, the economy, consumption, gender politics, and whakapapa. Issues that remain relevant to not only museums and their collections but also to society today. Guided by a curiosity for the stories told by objects that are overlooked or dismissed, Grace Lai is interested in seeking out the webs of connections between material and immaterial culture. This philosophy was developed during her time as an Alphawood Scholar at SOAS University of London. Today, Grace is an art historian and curator at Auckland Museum, where she leads he exhibition, curation, and development of the Applied Arts and Design Collection. Currently, her research is focused on expanding the collection and discourse of contemporary New Zealand practitioners – which has seen her get carried away by bags.

  • Art and Water Exhibition - Game Day, Meet the Scientists and Join the Dots (September 3 2019)

    Sunday 15 SEP, 10am-3pm, HD SKINNER ANNEX, OTAGO MUSEUM

     

    The Art and Science Series is proud to present its seventh exhibition, Art and Water: Mountains to the Sea, open to the public from 9–21 September 2019.

    This series is a collaboration between artists and scientists, and the exhibition displays projects culminating from this long and enriching journey.

    Open Daily: 9–21 September 2019, 10am–3pm

    On Sunday 15 September we have a day of Public Programme of events/activities:

    10am -12pm 
    HD SKinner Annex Gallery
    Ruth Evans will faciliatate a workshop called Go Mine, where members of the public will be invited to role play a card game she created as part of her Masters of Fine Arts research. People are invited to play or be spectators for this activity. Beware - to win is to lose! Come and find out why in this highly competitive hilarious game.

    12-3pm 
    Conservatory, HD SKinner Annex
    Meet the Scientists - presentations by scientists Nic Rawlence (Foulden Maar) and Chris Arbuckle (Touchstone Project Lake Wanaka) followed by an informal meet and greet in the Gallery with other scientists and artists from the Art and Water project. Check out the Cabinet of Curiosities where the scientists will also have displays relating to their research from the Art and Water project.

    12-3pm 
    HD SKinner Annex carpark (wet weather venue in the foyer)
    Find out why? A join the dots event in association with Otago EV Owners Society and Te Ao Tūroa Environment Strategy. Find out why, what we do on land has impacts on our waterways from the mountains to the sea.

     

     

  • Art and Water: Mountains to the Sea Exhibition (September 2 2019)

    9 - 21 SEPTEMBER, HD SKINNER ANNEX, OTAGO MUSEUM, 419 Great King St, North Dunedin, Dunedin 9016

    In 2019, the seventh in the Art and Science Series embarked on ‘Art + Water’ with the theme of ‘Water: Mountains to the Sea’. The project participants included artists and scientists from a range of organisations in Dunedin and the wider Otago area, including: Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic (alumni artists and current staff ); University of Otago (researchers from Biochemistry, Microbiology, Computer Science, Geology, Anatomy, Marine Science, Zoology, Science Communication, and the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies); the Dunedin Loom Room; Sinclair Wetlands and Ecosystems Consultants; and the Touchstone Citizen Project (Wanaka).

     

    Collaborative projects in ‘Art + Water’ explored widely, from the source of water, to the structure of water, and the journey of water on its way from the mountains to the sea. The artists interpreted research on a wide range of topics including the forms of water, ice-formation, water-related protein structures, water-borne disease in birds, fossilized structures made by aquatic/marine animals, impacts of land-use on water quality, water-born environmental DNA, effects of ocean acidification on marine calcifiers, ecology of the coastline shallows and the deep ocean canyons, bioengineering on farmland and conflicts in communities around water scarcity. Several of the projects revolved around implementation of research in environmental restoration work, including volunteer projects at Sinclair Wetlands and the Touchstone Citizen Project.

     

    As is traditional for this Series, the aim of the ‘Art and Water’ project was not illustration of the science but an artistic response to scientific research. Throughout, both artists and scientists were involved in sharing their process and describing their work in monthly communal meetings. It has been a long rich journey, from source to exhibition, and we hope it enriches your thoughts and involvement in helping to solve the huge challenges our waters face, now and in the future.

    > > CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING PUBLIC PROGRAMME

     

    Pam McKinlay and Jenny Rock, Co-coordinators

  • Public Exhibition: Topographies by Kate Watts (August 29 2019)

    16-19 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street), DUNEDIN

     

    Kate Watts

    Topographies

    EXHIBITION DATES: 16 - 19 September 2019

    OPENING: Monday 16 September, 5 – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY:  Ground Floor, P Block Riego Street (off Albany St) Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

  • Student, graduate among Best Design Awards finalists (August 29 2019)

    An Otago Polytechnic School of Design student and a graduate have been named finalists in the Designers Institute of New Zealand Best Design Awards 2019.

    The Best Design Awards, to be held at Spark Arena, Auckland, on 4 October, are an annual showcase of excellence in graphic, spatial, product, interactive and motion design.

    Third-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies student Bailey Nolet is a finalist in the Student Spatial category.

    Bailey’s entry, “Dunedin Architectural Centre”, imagines a minimalist brick building with strong curved lines and circular interior spaces. Overall, Bailey’s design aims to provide a precinct for architectural students and practitioners in Dunedin, an architectural library, exhibition spaces and storage for architectural archives.

    Kennedy Barnes, who graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Communication) in 2018, is a finalist in the Student Public Good category.

    Her entry, “In It Together”, focuses on an innovative digital publication created to support youth chemotherapy patients while undergoing treatment in Otago public hospitals. A project designed by Kennedy and the Young Adult Cancer Support Group Dunedin, “In It Together” illuminates patient experiences of local cancer survivors, using peer story-sharing to encourage resilience and courage.

    “We are very excited to have student projects selected as finalists in two categories,” says Caroline Terpstra, Acting Head of College – Art, Design and Architecture.

    “These projects represent the talent of 3rd year students from the Bachelor of Design (Communication) and Bachelor of Architectural Studies.

    “Through such projects, students have successfully researched and communicated complex ideas to an audience and addressed real-world issues using creative problem solving, technical skills and effective collaboration.

    “The Best Design Awards give students the opportunity to present their work to an audience of design professionals who are always keen to support and nurture new design talent,” Caroline says.

    “Previous Best Awards finalists and winners have built on their success to launch their design careers in New Zealand and overseas,” Caroline says, referring to Otago Polytechnic’s past successes.

    Last year, Otago Polytechnic claimed multiple medals at the Best Design Awards.

    Bachelor of Design (Product) graduate Tania Turei won a Gold in the Ngā Aho section; Bachelor of Design (Communication) graduate Erin Broughton claimed Gold in the Student Graphics category; Otago Polytechnic’s Food Design Institute’s collaboration with creative agency Geometry Global won a Gold in the Exhibition and Temporary Structures category;  Bachelor of Design (Communication) graduates Michael Smith, Becki Jones, Jaimee Caffell and Sherman Sreedhar won Bronze in the Student Moving Image category; and Bachelor of Architectural Studies Fraser Dixon won Bronze in the Student Spatial category.

    Read more about our Design programmes

  • Public Exhibition: Hayley Walmsley - Suzie No Friends (August 28 2019)

    2-5 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

     

    Hayley Walmsley
    Suzie No Friends: an archive of the abandoned, forgotten and neglected.

     

    EXHIBITION DATES: 2 - 5 September 2019

    OPENING: Monday 2 September, 5 – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

  • Fundraising Art Auction (August 28 2019)

    THURS 5 SEP, 5PM, THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET.

    At the invitation of Melbourne’s Grainger Museum, Dunedin School of Art students and staff members are crossing the Tasman to participate in Radiant Pavilion, a contemporary jewellery and object biennial.

    The opportunity to participate in the Radiant Pavilion emerged from CLINKProject, an initiative jointly established in 2014 by the jewellery departments of Hungry Creek Art & Craft School in Auckland and the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic. This year’s CLINKProject responds to the Grainger Museum’s diverse collections, which include musical instruments, beadwork and musical scores.

    To help fundraise for the trip, students and staff members are holding a fundraising auction – and you are invited to come along and support our artists.

    The work to be auctioned will be available for view in the Hub from Monday 2 September.

    Event details

    When: Thursday 5 September, 5.30pm
    Where: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic

     

    Artwork by Metiria Turei

  • Public Seminar: Geoffrey Batchen - Light and Dark: A Little History of the Negative (August 27 2019)

    FRI 6 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Geoffrey Batchen
    Light and Dark: A Little History of the Negative  

    One of the distinctive characteristics of photography is that most analogue photographs are positive prints that have been made from a negative. Nevertheless, the negative is almost always regarded as a secondary entity in discussions of photography, if it is discussed at all. Looking at work by a range of practitioners, including William Henry Fox Talbot, Man Ray, Dorothea Lange, Richard Avedon, Andreas Gursky and Linda Nagler, this talk will offer a little history of the negative, tracing some of the ways that history complicates our understanding of the photograph.  

    A renowned photo-historian, Geoffrey Batchen teaches art history at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. HIs books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography (1997); Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History (2001); Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance (2004); William Henry Fox Talbot (2008); Suspending Time: Life, Photography, Death (2010); and Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph (2016). Batchen has also curated exhibitions for the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro; the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam; the National Media Museum in Bradford, UK; the International Center of Photography in New York; the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne; the Izu Photo Museum in Shizuoka, Japan; the National Museum of Iceland in Reykjavik; the Adam Art Gallery in Wellington, NZ; the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, NZ; and the Centre for Contemporary Photography in Melbourne. In December, Batchen will be taking up the Chair of Art History at Oxford University in the UK.

  • Public Seminar: Angela Dwyer - Drawing as process of abstraction (August 27 2019)

    THURS 5 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Angela Dwyer
    Art as Projection, as Distortion, and that the very Act of Drawing and Painting is Abstraction.

    Angela Dwyer would like to introduce her work through a selection of her drawings and paintings of ‘ Irregular Squares’, Words, and some Figurative work while talking about Art as Projection, about Distortion, and that the very act of drawing and painting determines that art is in itself abstraction. In her work she wants us to think about what we consider abstraction and the abstract to be. Dwyer defines drawing as the placement of forms within a given space. She brings words into the realm of drawing by removing them from their original context and presenting them as pictorial elements within a pictorial space. She plays with the methods and ideas of distortion, creating subliminal interactions between the sacred and the banal, the intellectual and thepersonal.

    Angela Dwyer moves intentionally between style, concepts, and materials within any series of work. She has taken the square as a man-made form, but then distorted it, making it irregular. This should disqualify the form from still being named a square, if it were not for the viewer visually accepting this paradox, and because the form is recognisable, unconsciously the question of the abstract versus the concrete is introduced. Over the last thirty-five years she has been living and working in Berlin, Germany. Angela Dwyer was born in Palmerston North, New Zealand in 1961. She studied Art Conservation at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, and Fine Arts at the Otago School of Art, receiving the David Con Hutton Prize in 1981. After working a year in Wellington, she studied Painting at the School of Visual Arts in Gippsland, Australia in 1983 and began travelling around Europe, settling in West Berlin, Germany in 1984. In 1988 her daughter Alice, and in 1996 her son Jordan were born. Angela Dwyer has now had 24 Solo exhibitions of her paintings and drawings in Berlin and throughout Europe. She has taken part in 36 group shows and participated in many international Art Fairs i.e. Moscow, New York, Cologne, Rome and London. In 2009/10 Angela Dwyer was Guest-Professor at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts, and in 2013 the Georg Kolbe Museum Berlin showed her installations on two floors in the Farbe Raum Farbe exhibition. 2013 to 2016, she was Lecturer of Drawing and Painting, and developed and taught “Introduction to the Elements of Design” at the Institute of Design, Berlin. She has worked as an Art Director on multiple Film, Video and Theatre productions since 2002 and is Lecturer of Drawing at the Etage Theatre Production School Berlin. She will be the Artist in Residence at the Dunedin School of Art from August to December 2019.

  • Public Seminar: Print making with Neil Emmerson & Marion Wassenaar (August 26 2019)

    THURS 29 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Neil Emmerson & Marion Wassenaar
    Antipodean Encounters

    This seminar reflects on the many diverse encounters with an international, multidisciplinary, print community and with the Cantabria region of northern Spain, its people, history, art and architecture. IMPACT 10 Encuentro (Encounters) is the tenth, biennial International Multidisciplinary Printmaking Conference initiated and mentored by the University of the West of England and held in this iteration in the city of Santander, Spain, from 1st-8thSeptember, 2018.

    Neil Emmerson is a senior lecturer and studio coordinator of the Print Studio at Dunedin School of Art. For over thirty years he has pursued the expanded practice of print through the inclusion of installation and sculptural form, new and unconventional materials and the fusing of traditional and new technologies into his practice. He presented an exhibition titled Flight (370) during the conference at CASYC, Centro de Acción Social y Cultural (Centre of Social and Cultural Action).

    Marion Wassenaar lectures in the Print Studio at Dunedin School of Art and graduated with an MFA in 2013. Her research focuses on the collision between humans and their environment through experimental print practices and charcoal production. She presented a paper at the conference on the projects and collaborations undertaken by staff and students from the Print Studio and also exhibited an artist's book in the Museum of Prehistory and Archaeology of Cantabria.

  • Public Seminar: Paul Brobbel - Len Lye   (August 19 2019)

    THURS 22 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Paul Brobbel
    Pretty good, for the 21stCentury 

    Len Lye’s claim that his work will be ‘pretty good, for the 21stcentury’ was a witty but prescient exclamation made in the 1960s at the peak of his career as a kinetic artist. In relation to this notion of the future, curator Paul Brobbel will reflect upon posthumous activities and exhibition making of Lye’s work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. He will introduce the various concepts at play at the Len Lye Centre, looking closely at the unique opportunities and challenges in building an internationally recognised programme around a single artist in provincial Aotearoa. 

    Paul Brobbel is Senior Curator and Len Lye Curator at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre. In 2016 he was a Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Paul has worked at museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Auckland Museum and Puke Ariki. He has written extensively on the work of Len Lye including recent publications with the Getty Conservation Institute and Canterbury University Press.

  • Engineering students to help Vanuatu community (August 19 2019)

    A group of Otago Polytechnic Engineering students and staff are preparing to get stuck into a range of infrastructure projects on a remote Vanuatu island next month.

    The 16-strong contingent will spend 10 days on the small island of Paama, one of 83 islands that comprise the nation of Vanuatu, where they will work on a variety of water, sanitation and health projects.

    The Otago Polytechnic contingent’s forthcoming work, from 7-20 September, follows a similar project in 2018 on Paama, and comes on the back of earlier work done by Dunedin’s Highgate Presbyterian Church, which has helped improve infrastructure on the island.

    The students and staff have been involved in a range of fund-raising activities in recent months. This includes quiz nights, managing car-parking at concert events, sausage sizzles and selling sleep-outs built at Otago Polytechnic.

    The group is offering fellow Otago Polytechnic staff and students the opportunity to purchase solar-powered lighting systems that will be donated to households in Vanuatu.

    The project also closely aligns with Otago Polytechnic's sustainability principles, including its adherence to United Nations sustainable development goals (SDGs). Other initiatives include embedding sustainable practise within its curriculum development and campus development over the past decade.

    Richard Nyhof, Head of the College of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences, says the Vanuatu project is another example of Otago Polytechnic’s hands-on learning.

    Specifically aimed at students who have completed Civil Engineering programmes in Water and Waste Systems and Water and Waste Management, the projects include water disinfection, desalination, gravity-based water systems, sanitation, solar pumps and solar cooking.

    Importantly, the work on Paama integrates their classroom-based projects and academic theory with practical, real-world experience.

    “Our approach to teaching equips learners with the confidence and ability to tackle real-world problems,” Richard says.

    The project also closely aligns with Otago Polytechnic's sustainability principles, including its adherence to United Nations sustainable development goals (SDGs). Initiatives include embedding the concept of sustainable practise through its curriculum development and campus development over the past decade.

    For more information, contact: michael.mullens@op.ac.nz

    Read about our Engineering programmes

     

     

  • ART+WATER: Mountains to the Sea Exhibition (August 18 2019)

    9 - 21 SEPTEMBER, HD SKINNER ANNEX, OTAGO MUSEUM, DUNEDIN

    In 2019, the seventh in the Art and Science Series embarked on ‘Art + Water’ with the theme of ‘Water: Mountains to the Sea / aramoana’. The project participants included artists and scientists from a range of organisations in Dunedin and the wider Otago area, including: Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic (alumni artists and current staff ); University of Otago (researchers from Biochemistry, Microbiology, Computer Science, Geology, Anatomy, Marine Science, Zoology, Science Communication, and the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies); the Dunedin Loom Room; Sinclair Wetlands and Ecosystems Consultants; and the Touchstone Citizen Project (Wanaka).

    Collaborative projects in ‘Art + Water’ explored widely, from the source of water, to the structure of water, and the journey of water on its way from the mountains to the sea. The artists interpreted research on a wide range of topics including the forms of water, ice-formation, water-related protein structures, water-born disease in birds, fossilized structures made by aquatic/marine animals, impacts of land-use on water quality, water-born environmental DNA, effects of ocean acidification on marine calcifiers, ecology of the coastline shallows and the deep ocean canyons, bioengineering on farmland and conflicts in communities around water scarcity. Several of the projects revolved around implementation of research in environmental restoration work, including volunteer projects at Sinclair Wetlands and the Touchstone Citizen Project.

    As is traditional for this Series, the aim of the ‘Art and Water’ project was not illustration of the science but an artistic response to scientific research. Throughout, both artists and scientists were involved in sharing their process and describing their work in monthly communal meetings. It has been a long rich journey, from source to exhibition, and we hope it enriches your thoughts and involvement in helping to solve the huge challenges our waters face, now and in the future.

    Pam McKinlay and Jenny Rock, Co-coordinators

    Dates:  9 - 21 SEPTEMBER 2019
    Opening: Monday 9 September, 5.30PM
    Venue: HD Skinner Annex, Otago Museum
    Meet the scientists afternoon: Sunday 15th September

     

    The project is administered and curated by Pam McKinlay from the Dunedin School of Art and co-coordinated by Pam McKinlay and Dr Jenny Rock, Science Communication, University of Otago.

    (Poster design by Heramaahina Eketone, Pam McKinlay and Joanna Wernham 
    - pen and ink image for poster by Heramaahina Eketone, Waikato and Ngati Maniapoto)

     

     

    Co-ordinators:

    Pam McKinlay is an artist with a background in applied science and history of art. As an artist she works predominantly in sculpture, weaving and ceramics. She works in collaboration with other artists locally and nationally in community outreach and education projects around the theme of climate change, sustainability and biodiversity. Currently she works at the Dunedin School of Art.
    Pam McKinlay, Dunedin School of Art 
    Pam.McKinlay@op.ac.nz 

    Jenny Rock has backgrounds in science and art. She has spent > 20 years as a scientific researcher (particularly in marine biology) and is an intaglio and relief printmaker, as well as occasional poet. Currently she is a Sr Lecturer in Science Communication (University of Otago) focusing on aesthetics, participatory practice, sensory cognition, and ArtScience.

    Jenny Rock, Otago University 
    Jenny.Rock@otago.ac.nz

     

  • Design duo collaborate for NZ Fashion Week (August 14 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design student Rosette Hailles is putting the finishing touches to her inaugural New Zealand Fashion Week 2019 collection, “The Story of a Girl who Just Wanted Pink Hair”.

    Based on Rosette’s 2018 Otago Polytechnic graduate collection of the same name, the latest iteration revises and expands the concept – from five looks to eight – which will be shown as part of the Graduate Selection programme at New Zealand’s showcase fashion event, to be held in Auckland from 26 August-1 September.

    “I am making an entire new collection, drawing on the aesthetics and ideas from my original graduate collection,” explains Rosette who, having graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) last year, is now completing her Honours year.

    “I think the most exciting thing about this collection is the introduction of more colour and a range of screen prints.”

    Interestingly, Rosette has combined her talents with those of friend, business partner and fellow Otago Polytechnic Design (Communication) student Jessie Hamilton.

    “Jessie’s role has included designing prints, which I have screen-printed by hand on to different fabrics and used in a range of different pieces,” Rosette explains.

    “I think the addition of more colour will be really great for the runway. Another key feature of the collection is the use of metal wear.”

    Rosette’s initial inspiration for the collection came from her experience attending Catholic school throughout primary and high school.

    “I felt like I was in a place I didn’t belong or fit in. I started by taking aspects associated with my school uniform. This included a tartan design. I also wanted to include elements of a straitjacket to symbolise the restrictive aspects of a school uniform.

    “My goal is to shed light on things that are pushed to the side, things that people don't want to talk about, things that may offend, and things that go against popular opinion.”

    Jessie graduated with a Bachelor of Design in 2018 and is also completing Honours, which includes collaborating on a project with Rosette.

    She has brought her own set of skills to the table, including designing graphic, print-based elements that feature in the catwalk collection.

    However, Jessie says her role as a communication designer will be more apparent post-NZFW, particularly in relation to the pair’s Dunedin-based fashion label/business, BUSY GOING CRAZY. 

    “I do social media and design as well as run our website. I’ll be photographing and documenting the collection at NZ Fashion Week as well as designing communication material such as swing tags and posters,” Jessie says.

    “We will be hosting a pop-up store/exhibition In Dunedin after Fashion Week and I will also be designing the space and marketing for that. 

    “Rosette's collection and BUSY GOING CRAZY have some overarching values and are of very similar design aesthetic,” Jessie explains.

    “BUSY GOING CRAZY is a local fashion brand that values and nurtures individual identity and freedom of expression. Inspired by our own experiences within the creative circles of Dunedin, BUSY GOING CRAZY subverts tradition, authority and conformity to inspire individuality, rebellion and divergence.” 

    The pair set up BUSY GOING CRAZY at the start of 2018, initially collaborating on a limited  run of print-based t-shirts and hoodies  as part of a pop-up shop running during Dunedin’s iD Fashion Week – in particular, its Emerging Designer Awards show and competition.

    “We are not only design partners but business partners,” Jessie says. “Our collaborative process is very natural and, since we are such good friends, it works well.”

    “Showing at NZFW 2019 enables us to showcase our collection on a national scale. It is a huge opportunity to present our creative vision and, in all honesty, it is as nerve-wracking as it is exciting.

    “It is a huge honour to be selected and a major highlight of our careers. We will use our experience and presence at NZ Fashion Week after to market and promote ourselves.

    “Hopefully, our work will attract interest from the Industry and some of our favorite designers.”

    Read the Otago Daily Times feature article

    Read more about our Design programmes

  • Fashion graduate aims to shine light on race and identity (August 14 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Melissa Coull-Herewini hopes her New Zealand Fashion Week 2019 collection will shine a light on issues of race and identity.

    Melissa is busily completing her collection, “SHE’S GOT RIC”, which refers to “racial identity crisis” and explores growing up “mixed-race in a predominately white culture”, Melissa explains.

    Melissa’s work will be shown as part of the Graduate Selection programme at New Zealand’s showcase fashion event, to be held in Auckland from 26 August-1 September.

    “The garments are a reflection of contrasting and colliding cultures,” Melissa says.

    “The story of ‘RIC’ is told through fabric and colour. The combination of colours and textures creates a strong contrast, creating a visual story and a sense of being overwhelmed. They are all woven in together to reflect my experience in being mixed-race.”

    For example, one of Melissa’s signature collection pieces is a draped top made of knitted parka nylon.

    “It took 75 hours to cut strips of parka nylon and silk lurex, put them all back together and knit them into one garment.

    “And my hero piece is a 10-metre fluorescent yellow tulle gown, which is sewn together using shirring elastic. The shapes are completely free-form and the dress stretches and bounces as the wearer moves,” Melissa says. 

    “The collection was inspired by a letter, “Growing Up As A ‘Half-Cast’ in New Zealand”, by a woman called Lou Banks, who explored her own experiences in growing up mixed-race. It was something I really related to.”

    Melissa is excited about the exposure New Zealand Fashion Week 2019 offers.

    “I think it is important to know yourself that your work is valid first, before other people voice their own opinion of your work.

    It is nice to have NZFW supporting young designers, especially in a time where the New Zealand fashion industry isn’t necessarily booming.

    “To come from such a small town (Stratford, Taranaki) and humble beginnings and to be given this sort of validation is really amazing.”

    Melissa enrolled at Otago Polytechnic in 2014, completing a Certificate in Fashion (Level 4) then embarking on a Bachelor of Design (Fashion).

    Having graduated last year, she has since started a small label with her sister called DOUGLAS.

    “It is named after our late father. Being based in Stratford we hope to help bring some business back to a small community. We want to focus on inclusiveness and also sustainability.”

    Read more about our Design (Fashion) programmes

     

  • Exhibition: CELEBRATE 2019 (August 12 2019)

    20-30 AUGUST, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO STREET, (off Albany Street)

    Otago Secondary Schools Art Awards Exhibition 2019

    EXHIBITION DATES: Tuesday 20 August to Friday 30 August 2019

    OPENING: Tuesday 20 August, 5pm – 7pm
    Award Ceremony  at 6pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

  • Hundred Acre Wood pop up market (August 12 2019)

    Browse for items from our Product, Fashion and Communication design students Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday this week. Select from original one-off garments to t-shirts, graphic design prints and accessories.

  • Otago Polytechnic extends CEO’s contract as it seeks smooth transition to new model (August 9 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic has extended Chief Executive Phil Ker’s contract to manage a smooth transition to a revamped Vocational Education model.

    Otago Polytechnic’s Council asked Ker if he would extend his contract in order to help steer the ITP into the new environment. Having previously signalled he would step down as Otago Polytechnic CEO at the end of 2019, Ker has had his contract extended to June 12, 2020. This will be approximately three months into the new system.

    Ker says the extension of his contract is directly related to the Government’s Reform of Vocational Education (RoVE).

    “Since I started as Chief Executive in 2004, my focus has been on Otago Polytechnic being a successful organisation. In the current RoVE context, I want us to be as well prepared as we can to navigate this new era.

    “We are now in the early stages of moving to a new vocational education system.

    “Although Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ announcement last week indicated he had picked up on key points that Otago Polytechnic put forward in its submission to Government in April, the devil will be in the detail.

    “The Government has signalled it will announce legislation in September that will further define what a new Vocational Education system will look like,” Ker says.

    “We hope the details and shape of that legislation will build on the Minister’s latest indications to retain the regional integrity of high-performing institutions such as Otago Polytechnic.

    “Certainly, the language used in the Minister’s announcement on August 1 is the language of a network/system rather than a single provider – a pleasing change from the original proposal.

    “For now at least, the model that’s to be implemented allows Otago Polytechnic to retain our brand and regional identity – for two years beyond the April 1 changeover to NZIST.

    “We shouldn’t underestimate for a minute the work involved in this. We look forward to engaging with a wide range of industry and sector stakeholders to ensure their voices are heard, too.

    “From April 1, Otago Polytechnic will operate as a new subsidiary under NZIST. This will include a subsidiary board. We need quality Otago people to step up and ensure that the decisions made are in the best interests of our region.

    “In addition, Regional Skills Leadership Groups will identify skills needs and how to meet them in each region,” Ker notes.

    “In order to meet these goals and deliver for our region, we will need to have a strong Otago group comprised of energetic and influential employers, iwi and community leaders.

    “In the meantime, it is business as usual at Otago Polytechnic,” Ker says.

    “Current and prospective domestic and international learners can enrol in multi-year programmes, confident they will graduate as Otago Polytechnic students and have access to all the student support that we currently offer.”

    Key points:

    On August 1 2020, the Government revealed the latest details in its plans to reshape the vocational education system.

    • The New Zealand Institute Skills and Technology (NZIST-working title) brings together New Zealand’s current 16 institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs)
    • NZIST will be established on 1 April 2020.
    • All ITPs will continue as regional subsidiaries of the new institution for at least two years from April 1 2020
    • From now until 1 April, a national Establishment Board, based in Christchurch and comprising 10 members (including current Otago Polytechnic Council Chair Kathy Grant), will start work on the transition and continue until it is superseded by the governing council of the new institute on 1 April 2020

    Find out more about the RoVE

  • Highly Commended Awards in the 2019 Parkin Drawing Prize (August 8 2019)

    Congratulations to current Masters student Emily Gordon and alumni James Robinson for Highly Commended Awards  in the 2019 Parkin Drawing Prize. 

    The Parkin Prize promotes drawing in all its forms – as discovery, a testing of ideas, and decision making. The Parkin Prize is valued at $20,000 and is Aotearoa New Zealand’s premier award for drawing.

    The Parkin Drawing Prize exhibition season runs until 8 September at the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts Gallery Academy Galleries, Queens Wharf, Wellington.

     

    (Image - Emily Gordon, Frame in Black, charcoal and pastel on paper.)

  • Dunedin School of Art - LATE NIGHT / OPEN NIGHT (August 8 2019)

    FRIDAY AUGUST 16, 5-7.30PM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST (0FF ALBANY ST), DUNEDIN

    The Dunedin School of Art invites you to join us and celebrate our Bachelor of Visual Arts 1st and 2nd year student research exhibitions and our Media Arts student work. 


    Studying Art in 2020? The school will be open with staff available for tours of the school and to discuss applications for study in 2020.


    Conditional places in our programmes next year may be offered. Please bring along your portfolio or examples of your artwork.


    DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART Riego Street (off Albany St) Dunedin
    www.op.ac.nz/art


    EXHIBITION DATE: August 16, 2019, 5-7.30pm


    ART LATE NIGHT:  Friday 16 August. 5pm-7:30pm, Dunedin School of Art

  • OPEN SANDWICH - Aotearoa Digital Arts Meeting at the Dunedin School of Art (August 8 2019)

    THUR 22 AUGUST, P152, 5:30–7:30PM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, 19 RIEGO ST, (Off Albany St)

    Anteroom, Aotearoa Digital Arts (ADA), Blue Oyster Art Project Space and Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art and Design warmly invites you to a public meeting for feedback, planning and networking within the ADA membership and network. ADA is a network researching the expanded field around media, new media, electronic and digital art. 

    Around an open sandwich bar and round-table conversation, this meeting is aimed at current and new members of ADA to discuss future and past digital projects so as to get a deeper understanding on local and national activities and infrastructure from a makers perspective. Hear from current members speaking to previous projects and share your ideas and goals for local events to be developed.

    Open Sandwich is hosted by Anteroom, Aotearoa Digital Arts (ADA), Blue Oyster Art Project Space and Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin Schools of Art and Design.

    Open Sandwich aims to gain insight and perspectives from the community in order to enrich and diversify the digital arts network in Ōtepoti and the wider lower South Island Region.

    The ADA Network enables communication between artists, curators, teachers, critics, theorists, writers and the interested public. ADA develops public understanding of digital art through its online forum, through publications and exhibitions, and by touring speakers, holding master classes and symposia.

    > Free to attend, all are welcome.

  • Public Seminar: Barbara Graf - Corporeal Explorations (August 3 2019)

    THURS 8 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Barbara Graf
    Corporeal Explorations. On performative body sculptures and bodily topographies

    Barbara is an artist and lecturer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna in the Textile Department. In her work she investigates body representations and develops flexible sculptures as a second skin. The main media are drawing, sculpture, photography and film. Since 2004 she has been working in artistic research projects dealing with medical issues. She is currently developing her artistic doctoral thesis Stitches and Sutures on the visualization of body perception. 

    Barbara Graf presents works that deal intensively with the body. Covers, cloths and bandages describe a movement from the surface into the depths of the body. Once it is a solid protective wrapping, it is soon a fine translucent bandage into which physical structures are drawn with the sewing machine. Another time the body is drawn cartographically. The physical space is turned upside down, expanded or rearranged. Textile and physical tissues overlap. The works from the series of the Cloths show vulnerable bodies. Fabrics used in surgery are transformed artistically into membranes that embody corporeal expression and body perception.

  • Otago Polytechnic welcomes appointment of Kathy Grant to VE transition board (August 2 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic welcomes the appointment of Kathy Grant to the board tasked with leading the transition of the Vocational Education sector to a new model.

    Education Minister Chris Hipkins today (2 August) announced the members of the Establishment Board of the New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology (working title) that will provide both work-based and off-the-job vocational learning and training right across the country.

    The Institute, announced on 1 August, brings together the country’s 16 institutes of technology and polytechnics to operate as a single campus network — but with regionally responsive subsidiaries for at least 2 1/2 years.

    “I am delighted with Kathy’s appointment,” Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive Phil Ker says.

    “Kathy’s extensive experience – including as current chair of Otago Polytechnic’s Council –will help ensure the Establishment Board has the capability, skills and experience to make the transition effective.”

    The Establishment Board will comprise 10 members and be based in Christchurch.

    “It will start work on Monday and continue until it is superseded by the governing council of the Institute on 1 April 2020,” the Minister says.

    The members are: Wellingtonian Barry Jordan, Chair; Kim Ngārimu of Gisborne; Deputy Chair. Shane Culham, Maryann Geddes, Kathy Grant, Dr Sandra Grey, Tania Hodges, Brett O’Riley, Dr Linda Sissons, and Peter Winder.

    “Together, they provide a New Zealand-wide perspective,” the Minister says. “They are based in Northland, Auckland, Gisborne, Hamilton, Wellington, Queenstown and Dunedin and have personal and professional links to other regions.

    “I would like to acknowledge the work of the governing councils of institutions of technology and polytechnics across the country,” the Minister says.

    “I have asked all council members to stay on until the Institute is established and to continue to provide their leadership through the next months. These council members have made – and continue to make – a significant contribution their own institutions and to the sector as a whole.”

    Brief biographies of appointed members:

    Barry Jordan (Wellington) is a commercial, financial, and mediation specialist and former lead partner of the Deloitte Forensic & Restructuring teams in New Zealand. He is an accredited mediator and, in 2018, retired from the Deloitte partnership to operate as an independent commercial mediator. As a negotiator, Mr Jordan is able to identify areas of common interest and help develop options for mutual benefit. Mr Jordan is a member of the Advisory Board to the Brian Picot Chair in Ethical Leadership, at the School of Management at Victoria University.

    Kim Ngārimu Te Aitanga ā Mate, Ngāti Porou, has been a council-appointed member of the Eastern Institute of Technology since 2017. Based in Gisborne, she is a director of Tāua Limited, a consultancy specialising in public policy and management advice, and relationships with Iwi and Māori communities. Ms Ngārimu began her career at Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Porou. Senior public sector roles that followed included the Office of the Controller and Auditor General, Te Puni Kōkiri, the Ministry of Women’s Affairs and the Waitangi Tribunal. Ms Ngārimu is a member of the Medical Council of New Zealand.

    Shane Culham is the Chair of Culham Engineering in Whangarei. He joined the family business as an apprentice in 1973 and worked his way up. Appointed Managing Director in 2005, Mr Culham expanded the company to embrace construction in Auckland and maintenance contracts for the pulp and paper industry. Mr Culham is heavily involved in programmes linking local schools to industry, including a collaborative project with Whangarei Boys High School, and the creation of the Safe Trades training programme in conjunction with NorthTec. Mr Culham has extensive commercial governance experience.

    Maryann Geddes is the Group Manager Risk and Compliance at Skyline Enterprises and has developed the key human resource, training and development, risk and compliance processes and procedures for both New Zealand and off-shore subsidiaries. Ms Geddes was Operations Manager then Group Manager Human Capital & Compliance before taking up her current role. Ms Geddes is a board member of ServiceIQ. Her governance roles have included the RNZRSA, Tourism Industry Association, the Otago Southland Employers Association, the Aviation, Tourism and Travel Training Organisation and the Hospitality Standards Institute.

    Kathy Grant was formerly an Associate in the Dunedin legal practice of Gallaway Cook Allan. Mrs Grant has been a Ministerial appointee and Chair of the Otago Polytechnic Council since 2010, and was previously a member of the University of Otago Council and Chair of the Council of the Dunedin College of Education. She is also a deputy chair of Dunedin City Holdings Limited, and Dunedin City Treasury Limited. In 2015, the Minister of Health appointed Mrs Grant as Commissioner of Southern District Health Board following the disestablishment of the DHB.

    Dr Sandra Grey is the Communications and Campaigns Officer of the TEU and served as TEU National President (2011-12 and 2015-19). In her leadership of the TEU, Dr Grey focused on the professional and industrial needs of tertiary education colleagues and sought improvements in the tertiary education system. In May 2019, she was honoured by the TEU with a Life Membership Award. Dr Grey was a staff member of Victoria University 2003-14, continuing her research into a range of social and political issues. Dr Grey was the spokesperson for the campaign that fought successfully to win a referendum on the retention of MMP (2010-15).

    Tania Hodges JP, Ngāti Pāhauwera, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Hauā, Tuwharetoa, Maniapoto, Kahungunu. Ms Hodges is the Managing Director of Digital Indigenous.Com Ltd and has been consulting and facilitating leadership-training programmes since 2002. Her experience includes governance, funding, change management, and Māori and Iwi relationships. Ms Hodges’ governance roles have included the Waikato District Health Board, Ngāti Pahauwera Commercial Development Ltd, and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. Ms Hodges has an MBA and other tertiary qualifications in social science, business research and Te Reo Māori to complement her Registered Psychiatric Nursing qualification.

    Brett O’Riley is Chief Executive of the Employers and Manufacturers Association (EMA), owns O’Riley Consulting Group Ltd, and has a background in telecommunications and IT. He was the

    founding Chief Executive of NZICT Group made up of leading information and communications technology companies, Deputy Chief Executive of the Ministry of Science and Innovation, and Chief Executive of Auckland Tourism, Events & Economic Development (2012-2017). His governance experience includes the New Zealand Film Commission and Manaiakalani Education Trust. He chaired the 21st Century Digital Technologies Learning Reference Group.

    Dr Linda Sissons CNZM is the Chief Executive of PrimaryITO. Dr Sissons has an extensive background in the education sector. Her previous roles include Chief Executive of the Wellington Institute of Technology (2001-2015) and of the Hutt Valley Polytechnic (1999-2001). She was also Interim Chief Executive of Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre (2015/16). Dr Sissons is a board member of Education New Zealand and board Chair of the Commonwealth of Learning, an intergovernmental organisation concerned with the promotion and development of distance learning.

    Peter Winder has been a Ministerial appointee and Chair of Manukau Institute of Technology since 2013 and is a Member of the Advisory Committee to the Commissioner at Unitec. Mr Winder is a Director of McGredy Winder & Co. He was Chief Executive of Auckland Regional Council (2005-2010) and of Local Government New Zealand (2001-2003). He is Crown Manager of the Kaipara District Council, and is a member of the State Services Commission Risk and Audit Committee.

  • Otago Polytechnic welcomes revamped reform plan (August 1 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive Phil Ker welcomes Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ revamped proposal to reform the Vocational Education sector.

    “We are now in the first stages of moving into an entirely new vocational education system – and one that has picked up on all of the key points that Otago Polytechnic put forward in our submission.

    “We have been able to put our views across. We have been heard.

    “We argued for a system, rather than a head office, approach – and we’re getting a system approach.

    “We argued for significant autonomy to be retained – and it is being retained for at least 2 ½ years.

    “There will, of course, be devil in the detail, but we will be active players in trying to shape the system in a way that enables us to continue to flourish as an organisation.

    “A key point is, we have not been bowled out of the game that we want to play – in fact, we’re playing with some modified rules that will bring great opportunities for learners, staff and Otago Polytechnic.

    “We will fit into the tentatively-named New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology (NZIST) as a high-performing subsidiary – with the expectation that we will lead and share with the rest of the sector.

    “What is clear is that it is business as usual until April 1 2020 and, after that, most likely business as usual for at least another two years.

    “Prospective learners can enrol in multi-year programmes with confidence, knowing they will graduate as OP students and have access to all the student support that we currently offer.

    “The reforms are now very much about establishing a new system of provision. All ITPs will continue as subsidiaries of the new institution for at least two years from April 1 2020, when the new order comes into being.

    “There are many opportunities for Otago Polytechnic as a whole and for many of our staff to contribute to the development of a new networked model of vocational education.

    “Staff will continue to be employed by Otago Polytechnic and, after April 1 2020, by Otago Polytechnic as a subsidiary of the new institution.

    “We have absolute certainty that there will be no job changes as a result of these reforms until 1 April 2020. Moving into the new era, there will be another two years before the Government makes any further changes. In fact, the reform offers potential for growth in jobs at Otago Polytechnic.

    “Importantly, our strong brand will also continue.”

    The Minister also confirmed that degrees and postgraduate provision in Polytechnics will continue into the future, with no intentions of change. Otago Polytechnic will continue to apply to NZQA for further programme approvals.

    “There are opportunities coming our way – and we will future-proof our organisation.”

    Ker says it is also pleasing to see a clear intention from Government to design a fit-for-purpose funding model.

    “All of the right features have been identified. However, there is a notable silence in addressing the serious current underfunding of the sector – and that is disappointing.

    “We understand it may take two years to get a new model ready, but the sector needs an immediate funding boost to relieve the pressures that have arisen because of underfunding over the past decade.

    “The money is already in the system. We urge the minister to act immediately.”

    As part of the transition process, the Minister is setting up a new Establishment Board, which will have up to two years to manage the transition. The Board will be announced tomorrow (2 August) and come into effect on 1 April 2020. This will morph into the permanent board for NZIST.  

    “Over the next 2 ½ years Otago Polytechnic will progress and systemise the innovations we already have,” Ker says.

    “We will be even more agile in terms of the work we do and how we do it. We will continue to be responsive, innovative and flexible.

    “Nothing in today’s announcement suggests there will be changes to Otago Polytechnic’s Auckland campus, although the Minister has indicated concerns over international student numbers being concentrated in Auckland, preferring a more regional spread.

    “And given the strong regional focus in today’s announcement, I believe our Central Otago campus – and the Central Otago community – can look forward to further growth and innovation in that region.”

  • Otago Polytechnic Performance Analysis experts play role in Silver Ferns’ success (August 1 2019)

    If you were kept on the edge of your seat by every twist and turn in the Silver Ferns’ thrilling Netball World Cup final victory over Australia, spare a thought for Otago Polytechnic academic Hayden Croft.

    The Performance Analyst for the Silver Ferns, Hayden says he existed in a “bubble” for several weeks, both in the lead-up and during the tournament in Liverpool, which culminated in New Zealand beating Australia 52-51 in the final on 22 July.

    “Being involved with this World Cup-winning team has been surreal,” Hayden reflects.

    “Everything has been a bit of blur. Meetings, trainings, games … repeat. The win was a massive thrill for our players and management, who worked extremely hard.”

    Academic Leader for Otago Polytechnic’s Performance Analysis postgraduate programme, Hayden was in Liverpool for the World Cup campaign, but says he also received invaluable help from a team of Dunedin-based students back at home.

    “We had a group of several postgrad students coding and analysing opposition games throughout the World Cup – sometimes in the middle of the night. They were based at Otago Polytechnic’s Sargood Centre. 

    “Upon reflection, this campaign has been like a puzzle with many contributing factors, which all came together at the end.

    “From the staff at Netball New Zealand, to the players in the wider squad and World Cup squad, management and even our Otago Polytechnic Postgrad students doing stats and performance analysis support . . . there were so many meaningful contributions.”

    Hayden’s role as Performance Analyst requires him to create resources that help coaches and players prepare for a game or training.

    “This involves capturing video and statistics during games and trainings. During the game I generate live statistics that indicate how we are performing.

    “The structures and strategies we want to use in a game are evaluated using my statistics and video and then I work with the coaches to build examples of where these are working or not. 

    “The role is generally very busy and at times the Netball World Cup was very demanding.

    “We normally have 4-7 days to review a game and out a plan in place. However, in this World Cup we had eight games in 10 days, so the reviews had to be completed on the same day.”

    Hayden’s sporting expertise extends to a variety of areas, although all are focused on advancing coaching through the use of innovative technologies and performance analysis. He has worked with the All Blacks, Highlanders, Otago Rugby, Oceania Rugby and Southern Steel Netball and won the Innovation in Sport category at the 2015 Otago Sports Awards.

    Read more about our Sports, Exercise and Health postgraduate programmes

  • Public Seminar: EMMA BUGDEN - Situating the artist-run space today (July 29 2019)

    THURS 1 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    EMMA BUGDEN
    Testing grounds and launching pads: Situating the artist-run space today

    “We provide the first step, the interesting step and the step that’s free of constraints.” Jordana Bragg, co-founder, MEANWHILE

    Start an artist-run space and get famous.  A group of art school friends rent a cheap building, show their own work and that of their friends and catch the spotlight of the larger art world. Many of the current generation of New Zealand artists on the international scene entered the art world as members of an artist collective and many more cut their teeth exhibiting at one.  Artist-run spaces are sites for creative and intellectual research, workplaces and training grounds, and launching pads for professional development. Because of their role as laboratories for debate and development, artist-run spaces offer a chance to study the art world at its most intense. This seminar presents PhD research on the extent to which new generations of artist/workers have learnt to operate within neoliberal conditions to claim space for themselves and their peers. 

    Curator, writer and editor, Emma Bugden has carved out a career in the arts over two decades. Originally trained as an artist, she has worked as a curator for both independent spaces and public art museums, holding key leadership roles within the sector including Senior Curator at The Dowse Art Museum, Director of ARTSPACE, Curatorial Director, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts and Curator, City Gallery Wellington. Currently she is co-founder and Editor of Small Bore Books, a specialist art and design publishing imprint, while completing PhD study at the Stout Research Centre, Victoria University. She is the Managing Curator of SCAPE Public Art 2019 in Christchurch, a Trustee of the Blumhardt Foundation and a member of the Public Art Steering Group for the Whanganui District Council. Bugden was New Zealand Nominator for the Signature Art Prize 2018 at the Singapore Art Museum, Judge of the Portage Ceramic Awards 2017 and a Juror for the 2016 Walters Prize at Auckland Art Gallery. She was the keynote speaker for CoLab: Australia / New Zealand glass art conference 2019. 

  • Public Seminars: Semester Two Programme (July 29 2019)

    THURS 25 JULY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Johanna Zellmer
    Sweden Residency and Munich Showcase

    I consider contemporary jewellery to be able to function as an analytical tool or instrument of identity politics, with the possibility for it to be used as a medium of socio-political knowledge. This seminar will give an overview of my time as IASPIS grant holder working at Konstepidemin in Gothenburg, Sweden from March-June 2019. During this residency I engaged intensively with regional art communities through seminars, crit-sessions and exhibitionsin both Munich, Germany and Gothenburg, Sweden. 

    Johanna Zellmer completed a formal apprenticeship as a goldsmith in Germany and a master’s degree at the Australian National University, Canberra School of Art. She coordinates the Jewellery & Metalsmithing Studio and the Artist-in-Residence Programme at the Dunedin School of Art. Johanna co-founded CLINK Projects with Shane Hartdegen in 2014, a collaborative engagement in experimental and traditional making, writing and exhibition practice in the field of contemporary jewellery. Her research projects are frequently discussed by Indian Munich-based philosopher and cultural theorist Pravu Mazumdar, who examines the nature of art jewellery in relation to contemporary culture.

     

    THURS 1 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    EMMA BUGDEN
    Testing grounds and launching pads: Situating the artist-run space today

    “We provide the first step, the interesting step and the step that’s free of constraints.” Jordana Bragg, co-founder, MEANWHILE

    Start an artist-run space and get famous.  A group of art school friends rent a cheap building, show their own work and that of their friends and catch the spotlight of the larger art world. Many of the current generation of New Zealand artists on the international scene entered the art world as members of an artist collective and many more cut their teeth exhibiting at one.  Artist-run spaces are sites for creative and intellectual research, workplaces and training grounds, and launching pads for professional development. Because of their role as laboratories for debate and development, artist-run spaces offer a chance to study the art world at its most intense. This seminar presents PhD research on the extent to which new generations of artist/workers have learnt to operate within neoliberal conditions to claim space for themselves and their peers. 

    Curator, writer and editor, Emma Bugden has carved out a career in the arts over two decades. Originally trained as an artist, she has worked as a curator for both independent spaces and public art museums, holding key leadership roles within the sector including Senior Curator at The Dowse Art Museum, Director of ARTSPACE, Curatorial Director, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts and Curator, City Gallery Wellington. Currently she is co-founder and Editor of Small Bore Books, a specialist art and design publishing imprint, while completing PhD study at the Stout Research Centre, Victoria University. She is the Managing Curator of SCAPE Public Art 2019 in Christchurch, a Trustee of the Blumhardt Foundation and a member of the Public Art Steering Group for the Whanganui District Council. Bugden was New Zealand Nominator for the Signature Art Prize 2018 at the Singapore Art Museum, Judge of the Portage Ceramic Awards 2017 and a Juror for the 2016 Walters Prize at Auckland Art Gallery. She was the keynote speaker for CoLab: Australia / New Zealand glass art conference 2019. 

     

    THURS 8 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Barbara Graf
    Corporeal Explorations. On performative body sculptures and bodily topographies

    Barbara Graf is an artist and lecturer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna in the Textile Department. In her work she investigates body representations and develops flexible sculptures as a second skin. The main media are drawing, sculpture, photography and film. Since 2004 she has been working in artistic research projects dealing with medical issues. She is currently developing her artistic doctoral thesis Stitches and Sutures on the visualization of body perception. 

    Graf presents works that deal intensively with the body. Covers, cloths and bandages describe a movement from the surface into the depths of the body. Once it is a solid protective wrapping, it is soon a fine translucent bandage into which physical structures are drawn with the sewing machine. Another time the body is drawn cartographically. The physical space is turned upside down, expanded or rearranged. Textile and physical tissues overlap. The works from the series of the Cloths show vulnerable bodies. Fabrics used in surgery are transformed artistically into membranes that embody corporeal expression and body perception.

     

    THURS 15 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Udo Prinsen
    Visiting Artist

    Udo will talk about his profession as a multi-disciplinary practitioner, how his artistic ambitions relate to science projects, and present an overview of the Dutch media and design landscape. His latest project Touch base, arctic solargraphy will be a thread throughout the talk.

    Udo Prinsen is a director and visual artist based in the Netherlands. He works for feature films, documentaries and television, and also creates exhibits and presentations for museum and science related institutes and projects. Udo works independently and under commission in a multi-disciplinary field, mostly using tools like animation and long exposure photography to create his imagery.  

     

    THURS 22 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Paul Brobbel
    Pretty good, for the 21stCentury 

    Len Lye’s claim that his work will be ‘pretty good, for the 21stcentury’ was a witty but prescient exclamation made in the 1960s at the peak of his career as a kinetic artist. In relation to this notion of the future, curator Paul Brobbel will reflect upon posthumous activities and exhibition making of Lye’s work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. He will introduce the various concepts at play at the Len Lye Centre, looking closely at the unique opportunities and challenges in building an internationally recognised programme around a single artist in provincial Aotearoa. 

    Paul Brobbel is Senior Curator and Len Lye Curator at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre. In 2016 he was a Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Paul has worked at museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Auckland Museum and Puke Ariki. He has written extensively on the work of Len Lye including recent publications with the Getty Conservation Institute and Canterbury University Press.

     

    THURS 29 AUG, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Neil Emmerson & Marion Wassenaar
    Antipodean Encounters

    This seminar reflects on the many diverse encounters with an international, multidisciplinary, print community and with the Cantabria region of northern Spain, its people, history, art and architecture. IMPACT 10 Encuentro (Encounters) is the tenth, biennial International Multidisciplinary Printmaking Conference initiated and mentored by the University of the West of England and held in this iteration in the city of Santander, Spain, from 1st-8thSeptember, 2018.

    Neil Emmerson is a senior lecturer and studio coordinator of the Print Studio at Dunedin School of Art. For over thirty years he has pursued the expanded practice of print through the inclusion of installation and sculptural form, new and unconventional materials and the fusing of traditional and new technologies into his practice. He presented an exhibition titled Flight (370) during the conference at CASYC, Centro de Acción Social y Cultural (Centre of Social and Cultural Action).

    Marion Wassenaar lectures in the Print Studio at Dunedin School of Art and graduated with an MFA in 2013. Her research focuses on the collision between humans and their environment through experimental print practices and charcoal production. She presented a paper at the conference on the projects and collaborations undertaken by staff and students from the Print Studio and also exhibited an artist's book in the Museum of Prehistory and Archaeology of Cantabria.

     

    THURS 5 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Angela Dwyer
    Art as Projection, as Distortion, and that the very Act of Drawing and Painting is Abstraction.

    Angela Dwyer would like to introduce her work through a selection of her drawings and paintings of ‘ Irregular Squares’, Words, and some Figurative work while talking about Art as Projection, about Distortion, and that the very act of drawing and painting determines that art is in itself abstraction. In her work she wants us to think about what we consider abstraction and the abstract to be. Dwyer defines drawing as the placement of forms within a given space. She brings words into the realm of drawing by removing them from their original context and presenting them as pictorial elements within a pictorial space. She plays with the methods and ideas of distortion, creating subliminal interactions between the sacred and the banal, the intellectual and thepersonal.

    Angela Dwyer moves intentionally between style, concepts, and materials within any series of work. She has taken the square as a man-made form, but then distorted it, making it irregular. This should disqualify the form from still being named a square, if it were not for the viewer visually accepting this paradox, and because the form is recognisable, unconsciously the question of the abstract versus the concrete is introduced. Over the last thirty-five years she has been living and working in Berlin, Germany. Angela Dwyer was born in Palmerston North, New Zealand in 1961. She studied Art Conservation at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, and Fine Arts at the Otago School of Art, receiving the David Con Hutton Prize in 1981. After working a year in Wellington, she studied Painting at the School of Visual Arts in Gippsland, Australia in 1983 and began travelling around Europe, settling in West Berlin, Germany in 1984. In 1988 her daughter Alice, and in 1996 her son Jordan were born. Angela Dwyer has now had 24 Solo exhibitions of her paintings and drawings in Berlin and throughout Europe. She has taken part in 36 group shows and participated in many international Art Fairs i.e. Moscow, New York, Cologne, Rome and London. In 2009/10 Angela Dwyer was Guest-Professor at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts, and in 2013 the Georg Kolbe Museum Berlin showed her installations on two floors in the Farbe Raum Farbe exhibition. 2013 to 2016, she was Lecturer of Drawing and Painting, and developed and taught “Introduction to the Elements of Design” at the Institute of Design, Berlin. She has worked as an Art Director on multiple Film, Video and Theatre productions since 2002 and is Lecturer of Drawing at the Etage Theatre Production School Berlin. She will be the Artist in Residence at the Dunedin School of Art from August to December 2019.

     

    FRI 6 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Geoffrey Batchen
    Light and Dark: A Little History of the Negative  

    One of the distinctive characteristics of photography is that most analogue photographs are positive prints that have been made from a negative. Nevertheless, the negative is almost always regarded as a secondary entity in discussions of photography, if it is discussed at all. Looking at work by a range of practitioners, including William Henry Fox Talbot, Man Ray, Dorothea Lange, Richard Avedon, Andreas Gursky and Linda Nagler, this talk will offer a little history of the negative, tracing some of the ways that history complicates our understanding of the photograph.  

    A renowned photo-historian, Geoffrey Batchen teaches art history at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. HIs books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography (1997); Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History (2001); Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance (2004); William Henry Fox Talbot (2008); Suspending Time: Life, Photography, Death (2010); and Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph (2016). Batchen has also curated exhibitions for the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro; the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam; the National Media Museum in Bradford, UK; the International Center of Photography in New York; the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne; the Izu Photo Museum in Shizuoka, Japan; the National Museum of Iceland in Reykjavik; the Adam Art Gallery in Wellington, NZ; the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, NZ; and the Centre for Contemporary Photography in Melbourne. In December, Batchen will be taking up the Chair of Art History at Oxford University in the UK.

      

    THURS 12 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Grace Lai
    Carried Away: Bags Unpacked

    The bag, and the handbag in particular, has achieved high fashion status, but what's the cultural and historical significance behind the bag? Why do we use them and not just have pockets? Why don't men routinely use them? Does every culture have a tradition of using bags? The Auckland Museum exhibition Carried Away: Bags Unpacked is a collection of 150 bags from their Applied Arts and Design Collection, a nationally significant research archive of key makers and designers from New Zealand and abroad, and this book serves as both a photographic record and an exploration of the symbolism and power behind bags.

    Grace Lai, curator of the collection unpacks issues carried by the bag: of colonialism, the economy, consumption, gender politics, and whakapapa. Issues that remain relevant to not only museums and their collections but also to society today. Guided by a curiosity for the stories told by objects that are overlooked or dismissed, Grace Lai is interested in seeking out the webs of connections between material and immaterial culture. This philosophy was developed during her time as an Alphawood Scholar at SOAS University of London. Today, Grace is an art historian and curator at Auckland Museum, where she leads he exhibition, curation, and development of the Applied Arts and Design Collection. Currently, her research is focused on expanding the collection and discourse of contemporary New Zealand practitioners – which has seen her get carried away by bags.

     

    THURS 19 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Mark Braunias
    Messing about in studios
     

    Mark Braunias is a New Zealand based artist who has exhibited extensively over the past 30 years. He graduated with a BFA from Canterbury University, Ilam School of Fine Arts, Christchurch in 1988. Mark Braunias was the inaugural winner of the James Wallace Art Award in 1992 and received a Wallace/Fulbright scholarship to complete an artist residency at Headlands Center For The Arts in San Francisco during 2011. Braunias has also completed artist residencies at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery (2002), William Hodges Fellowship, Invercargill (2005), and Tylee Cottage, Whanganui (2007). He has appeared in curated public gallery exhibitions including A very peculiar practice (City Gallery, Wellington, 1995), Gruesome (Robert McDougal Art Gallery, Christchurch, 1999), The Cartoon Show (Auckland Art Gallery, 2002) and Field of Vision: A survey of Mark Braunias (Wallace Arts Centre, Auckland, 2016) and also exhibited work at Sydney Contemporary Art Fair (2015) and Hong Kong Central  Art Fair (2015) in association with Bath Street Gallery.

    Braunias has published a number of art catalogues including Praha (1992),  Gank (2001),  A Day In My Life (2003),  My New Art God  (2004),  Congo (2006), Waterfront Industry Commission Report  (2006),  London Town (2008) and Encyclo-Dimensional (2015). His work is held in public gallery and private collections including : Te Papa Museum, Christchurch Art Gallery, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Sarjeant Art Gallery, Tauranga Art Gallery, Invercargill Art Gallery and Museum, Ashburton Art Gallery, Auckland University, Canterbury University, Lincoln University, Fletcher Trust Collection, Wallace Arts Trust and the State Library Of Queensland. www.markbraunias.com

     

    THURS 26 SEP, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Leoni Schmidt
    Venice 2019: May you live in interesting times

    This seminar shares the presenter's recent experiences of the Venice Biennale 2019. Violent Rages, Tragedies of Loss, Wry Humour, and Apocalyptic Cacophonies are some of the registers of contemporary practice exhibited this year by more than 90 countries and thousands of artists 116 years after the advent of this international showcase for the visual arts. 

    Dr. Leoni Schmidt is the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic in Dunedin and Auckland, New Zealand. She is a full professor in the Dunedin School of Art at the same institution. 

     

    THURS 17 OCT, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Rachel Allan and Alex Lovell-Smith
    Code & silver
     

    As graduates of Dunedin School of Art, Alex Lovell-Smith and Rachel Hope Allan find themselves working between multiple digital media and analogue processes. In this seminar they will discuss the intersections and overlaps in their photographic practices. Both share a passion for the darkroom and the alchemical and arcane process of film and silver salts and mix these techniques with contemporary technology, digital media and the changing photographic landscape. 

    Lovell-Smith and Allan are Lecturers in Photography and Electronic Arts at the Dunedin School of Art. Both are independent practitioners, researching and experimenting in a range of photographic and  (unhol) mixture of image making systems.

     

    THURS 24 OCT, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Kalisolaite ‘Uhila
    Dunedin Public Art Gallery Visiting Artist 

    Kalisolaite achieved his Bachelor of Visual Arts from Auckland University of Technology, Auckland in 2010.  Just one year after graduating, he earned the Visual Arts Award for his work Pigs In The Yard at The Auckland Fringe 2011 Awards.  In 2013 Kalisolaite received the Iris Fisher Scholarship from Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts, Pakuranga while studying for his Postgraduate Diploma in Dance from the University of Auckland; awarded annually to assist postgraduate art students with promising and visionary (http://www.tautai.org/artist/kalisolaite-uhila/)

    DPAG NZ visiting artist Kalisolaite Uhila will present a number of performances while in Dunedin, including a durational drumming performance that will extend across 80 days, based in the BNZ gallery on the ground floor of DPAG.  Paying reference to various histories and ancestories Kalisolaite ‘Uhila’s performance work is also receptive to the every day and the multiplicities of being.

     

     

     

  • Blessing marks official opening of Heavy Transport learning facility (July 26 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic celebrated the official opening of its new Heavy Automotive Engineering facility today, Friday, 26 July.

    Janine Kapa, Deputy Chief Executive, Māori Development/Kaitohutohu, and Ron Bull, Tumuaki Whakaako, led staff, students and industry representatives in a morning blessing of the premises in Donald St, Kaikorai Valley, before industry representatives, staff and students celebrated the opening of the facility with a barbecue at 3pm.

    Read more about our New Zealand Certificate in Heavy Automotive Engineering (Level 4) as well as our apprenticeship pathways

     

  • Otago Polytechnic celebrates opening of new Heavy Automotive Engineering facility (July 25 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic will celebrate the official opening of its new Heavy Automotive Engineering facility on Friday, 26 July.

    Representatives from Ngāi Tahu and Otago Polytechnic will attend a 9am blessing of the premises in Donald St, Kaikorai Valley, before industry representatives, staff and students celebrate the opening with a barbecue at 3pm.

    The facility will specifically cater to new automotive programmes aimed at meeting the demands of industry.

    The New Zealand Certificate in Heavy Automotive Engineering (level 4) is the result of close consultation with local industry and meets an acknowledged skills shortage.

    With strands in Road Transport, Plant and Equipment, Agricultural Equipment, and Materials Handling, it is structured in the same format as Otago Polytechnic’s light vehicle/auto electrical programmes, which have been highly successfully in training apprentices to meet industry needs in the Otago region.

    Otago Polytechnic is also expanding its New Zealand Certificate in Automotive Engineering (Level 3) (Pre-Trade) programme to offer increased content training in heavy as well as light automotive engineering training.

    Both programmes were introduced at the start of second semester, July 2019.

    In addition, Otago Polytechnic will offer Heavy Transport Driver Licence* training from September.

    *Subject to final approval from NZQA.

    Read more about our New Zealand Certificate in Heavy Automotive Engineering (Level 4) as well as our apprenticeship pathways

     

  • Call for Abstracts: Open Education (August 14 2019)

    We invite submissions for presentations at the inaugural ‘National OER practitioner and leadership symposium,’ hosted by the National Centre for Open Education Practice at Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin on 5-6 December 2019.

    Our aim at the Centre is to accelerate the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Educational Practices (OEP) through digital transformation for the benefit of learners in New Zealand.

    The theme for the symposium is ‘Our OER people make a better world.’ We are seeking submissions with a practical, theoretical and/or forward-looking focus. Subthemes are:

    • Social justice through open education
    • Making education more sustainable through open education
    • Leading change towards more open education
    • Open Educational Practices

    We welcome three types of submission:

    Full presentations

    Full presentations will last 20 minutes, plus a short opportunity for questions from the audience. All submissions for full presentations will be peer reviewed. After the symposium, abstracts will be published with presenters’ biographical information

    Snap-shot presentations

    Snap-shot presentations will be shorter (10 minutes). Snap-shots are an opportunity to present emerging ideas that could form the basis of future research or practice, or early stage research findings. This is also an opportunity for emerging researchers and open education practitioners to contribute to the open education community. Snap-shot presentations will be reviewed by a team at the Centre for Open Education Practice.

    Workshops (Day 2)

    Workshops will last 50 minutes. These are an opportunity to go into slightly more depth with the practical application of open educational practice, and will be interactive and hands-on. Workshops may be facilitated individually or in pairs, and will give participants an experience of OER and/ or OEP.

     

    Abstracts:

    Abstracts must:

    • Not exceed 200 words
    • Address the symposium’s theme of “OER people make a better world” and fit with at least one of the sub-themes
    • Indicate whether the preferred format is:

    -          a full presentation,
    -          a snapshot presentation, or
    -          a workshop.

    • Be accompanied by a profile of the presenter’s biographical and institutional information of no more than 200 words
    • Be received before the deadline of 30 September 2019 by email to su.bolland@op.ac.nz

    Symposium registration is free for presenters.

    Visit the website of the National Centre for Open Education Practice for more information and to register your interest in the symposium.

     

    Image credit: ‘The Opposite of Open is…’ by Alan Levine, used under Creative Commons licence CC-BY-2.0

  • Public Seminar: Johanna Zellmer - Sweden Residency and Munich Showcase (July 23 2019)

    THURS 25 JULY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN


    Johanna Zellmer

    Sweden Residency and Munich Showcase


    I consider contemporary jewellery to be able to function as an analytical tool or instrument of identity politics, with the possibility for it to be used as a medium of socio-political knowledge. This seminar will give an overview of my time as IASPIS grant holder working at Konstepidemin in Gothenburg, Sweden from March-June 2019. During this residency I engaged intensively with regional art communities through seminars, crit-sessions and exhibitions in both Munich, Germany and Gothenburg, Sweden.


    Johanna Zellmer completed a formal apprenticeship as a goldsmith in Germany and a master’s degree at the Australian National University, Canberra School of Art. She coordinates the Jewellery & Metalsmithing Studio and the Artist-in-Residence Programme at the Dunedin School of Art. Johanna co-founded CLINKProjects with Shane Hartdegen in 2014, a collaborative engagement in experimental and traditional making, writing and exhibition practice in the field of contemporary jewellery. Her research projects are frequently discussed by Indian Munich-based philosopher and cultural theorist Pravu Mazumdar, who examines the nature of art jewellery in relation to contemporary culture.

  • H¯opua Whakaata (July 23 2019)

    Fresh from two years travelling in the Netherlands, Dunedin-based art collective E-Kare returned to its home city to faciliate a new student-led exhibition, H¯opua Whakaata, for the Puaka Matariki Festival.

    Eighteen students from the Dunedin School of Art  took part in the exhibition which was installed in The Hub  4-16 July.

    H¯opua Whakaata Art Collection celebrated the artistic success of tauira (students) at Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. 

    Event organiser and artist Piupiu-Maya Turei says work from eighteen students from the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic was on display. The wide range of  artworks from M¯aori students was made from a variety of media and forms, from copper wire sculpture to photographs, paintings, jewellery and textile work.

    (image Hayley Walmsley)

  • Exhibition: Barbara Graf visiting artist from Vienna (July 23 2019)

    6-16 AUGUST, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Barbara Graf

    Corporeal Explorations

    EXHIBITION DATES: 6 - 16 August, 2019

    OPENING: Tuesday 6 August, 5 – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

     

    Barbara Graf was born in 1963 in Winterthur, Switzerland and lives and works in Vienna, Austria and Winterthur, Switzerland. She studied from 1985-90 at the Academy University of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria and majored in the Master Class for Experimental Art – Painting and Graphics, Prof. Maria Lassnig. From 2003-2010 Barbara became guest lecturer at the Academy of Art and Design (HGK), Fashion Design, Basel in Switzerland. Since 2004 she is lecturing at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, in the Institute of Art Sciences and Art Education: Textiles. Barbara Graf has been working on the artistic investigation of the human anatomy, the body and its visual culture since 30 years – an example is the invention of the flexible sculptures "Anatomical Garments" (ongoing since 1989): a position between sculpture, clothing as second skin, reflections about medical visualisations and socio-cultural defined visual images of the body. Executions of the works are mainly in the media of drawing, textiles, photography and film.

     

    Barbara Graf is the Dunedin School of Art Artist in Residence from 24 July – 24 August 2019. This autonomous residency supports artists contributing to the Dunedin School of Art’s wider community and receives a funding contribution from the Fred Staub Open Art Fund. It is open to expressions of interest from national and Trans-Tasman artists. 

  • Exhibition: Mia Stefano (July 23 2019)

    29 JULY - 1 AUGUST, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, REIGO STREET, DUNEDIN

     

    Mia Stefano
    mva.kim

     

    EXHIBITION DATES: 29 July - 1 August, 2019

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

  • Call for Papers: Professional Practice Symposium (October 18 2019)

    This year's symposium theme is Exploring Professional Futures.

    When:            Wednesday 11th December. 9.00am - 4.30pm.  No charge. Lunch provided.
    Why:              Celebrating and sharing our diversity and exploring our learning edges around professional practice 
    Who:              All welcome.  Staff, Learners, Alumni, professionals interested in deepening their practice.  
    Where:          The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth St, Dunedin and 350 Otago Polytechnic Auckland International Campus, Queen Street, Auckland (Level 6), and some presentations online on Zoom. 

    Full Presentations:

    20 minute talk with 10 minute discussion.  Suitable for sharing ideas, research, practice.  200-300 word abstract by 12th October. 

    Peer reviewed. Published in conference proceedings.  PowerPoint presentations. 

    For those who want to participate from outside Dunedin or Auckland, these sessions will be streamed via Zoom.

    Snapshot: smaller group talks in Open Space: 

    10 minute talk, followed by 20 minute discussion.  Suitable for:  canvassing ideas, work-in-progress, helping with problems, posing questions, looking for collaborations etc.  Not peer reviewed – requires a title and 1-2 sentences on the planned snapshot talk by 12th October.   No PowerPoint (handouts are acceptable if presenters want to provide these).  

    These sessions will be held in open space in Dunedin and Auckland.

    Please submit your presentation abstract or snapshot title to Jo Thompson by email by 1st November 2019.

    For more information, please email Jo Thompson.

  • Waste Jam hailed a success (July 8 2019)

    Dunedin’s very first “Waste Jam” has been hailed a success.

    Fifty Dunedin locals spent their weekend at Startup Dunedin’s inaugural Waste Jam, a 48-hour event to create new initiatives in minimising waste in Dunedin. 

    Dunedin City Council allocates up to $40,000 per year for innovation and development in minimising waste. Collaborative projects are encouraged, but unfortunately the fund typically receives very few applications. In response, Startup Dunedin launched Waste Jam to facilitate more applications. 

    The weekend-long event at Otago Polytechnic’s Hub brought those with experience and passion for waste minimisation together with experts and mentors who could contextualise and accelerate their ideas. 

    Guest speakers included Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive of Dunedin City Council; Rachel Barker, CEO of Plastics NZ; Jim O’Malley, Dunedin City Councillor; and Deborah Manning, CEO and Founder of KiwiHarvest.

    Rachel Butler, from Startup Dunedin, who coordinated the event, said: “Half the challenge is getting the right people in the same room as each other. Many of the attendees were already working on projects that made a difference in the community. Waste Jam was about giving them the opportunity to collaborate.” 

    The weekend also featured a “human library" of 20 experts in various fields who were available to give advice.

    Louise Evans, a Design Sprint expert who travelled from Invercargill to mentor over the weekend, said: “It’s exciting to see this level of collaboration in the south. The weekend was full of plenty of ideas but more importantly a wealth of people that are committed to action.” 

    Startup Dunedin created Waste Jam in collaboration with the Otago Polytechnic, University of Otago and Dunedin City Council. 

    The weekend was facilitated by Alice Marsh, Co-founder of the Social Experiment and Ray O’Brien, Learning and Teaching Specialist of Otago Polytechnic.

    Ray described waste as “one of the great challenges of our time”.

    “No council, government or organisation is equipped to deal with waste effectively on their own. We all need to do our bit.”

     

  • Otago Polytechnic and Ara launch open education centre (July 5 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic and Ara Institute of Canterbury have launched a national Centre for Open Education Practice to promote, research, and develop open educational resources and practices for the benefit of all New Zealand learners in the post-secondary sector.  

    Headquartered at Otago Polytechnic, the national Centre for Open Education Practice will be a game-changer for higher education in New Zealand, ensuring greater access to free resources for learners and developing capabilities of educators at all levels.

    New Zealand is lagging behind its international counterparts, including Canada and the United States, whose governments have made significant investments in open educational resources (OER) to reduce the cost of study and improve the quality of learning. The Centre for Open Education Practice aims to ensure that New Zealand does the right thing by proactively adopting open education solutions to achieve more sustainable higher education for all.

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) describes OER as learning, teaching, and research material in any format or medium which reside in the Public Domain or are under copyright released under an open license that permits no-cost access, reuse, repurposing, adaptation, and redistribution by others.

    “The Centre’s model promises to be a game-changer in any fit-for-future Vocational Education system,” says Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive, Phil Ker.

    “In the context of the Government’s Reform of Vocational Education (RoVE) proposals, we strongly recommend it incorporates OER for a more cost-effective and sustainable solution.

    “The Centre’s highly collaborative model will result in a world-class, integrated on-line service.

    “As a small nation, New Zealand must eliminate unnecessary duplication of learning resources to become more sustainable. We cannot afford not to be collaborating on curriculum development.”

    Dr Wayne Mackintosh, New Zealand’s UNESCO Chair in OER and Director of Otago Polytechnic’s International Centre for Open Education, says all education materials developed using taxpayer funding should be released under an open copyright license - for the benefit of all New Zealanders.

    “Rather than wait for the Government to mandate open licensing in the tertiary education sector, the new Centre will establish a collaborative network to increase the adoption of OER and corresponding open educational practices (OEP) for all New Zealand institutions”.

    The Centre will focus on three projects in preparation for the ‘National OER Practitioner and Leadership Symposium’ at Otago Polytechnic, to take place in early December, which will bring leaders, policy-makers, and practitioners together to develop proposals for action for OER and OEP in New Zealand.

    Commencing after the winter semester break on 22 July 2019, the Centre will offer free online micro-courses to all New Zealand students to improve digital literacies. New Zealand learners will have options for micro-credentials and pathways that enable them to achieve academic credit in New Zealand, as well as university-level qualifications in Canada, United Kingdom, and the United States.

    The Centre will also provide free capacity development for post-secondary educators, leading to an ‘OER practitioner’ certification.

    Before then, the Centre will commission a research project to investigate text-book affordability in New Zealand’s higher education sector, reporting back on its findings at the December Symposium.

    All New Zealand tertiary education providers, research entities, community libraries, non-profit organisations, corporations, and interested individuals can affiliate with the Centre by signing up as ‘Founding Partners’ before the symposium. The Centre has established a website at coep.nz to administer the registration of affiliate members.

    Already, a number of New Zealand-based institutions see the value of the Centre and have signed up in advance as founding members. These include the University of Canterbury’s e-Learning Research Lab, Tohatoha Aotearoa Commons, the New Zealand Open Source Society, Catalyst, Massey University and Ara Institute of Canterbury.

    “The global movement to democratise knowledge is a key enabler for transformative education,” Massey’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Jan Thomas, says.

    “At its heart, Massey University believes high-quality education for all, regardless of background, is a necessary prerequisite for a just world. We are proud to be a founding partner in NZ for the national Centre for Open Education Practice.”

    The Centre is proud to partner with BCcampus and eCampusOntario in Canada, who both lead successful open textbook initiatives for the post-secondary sector in their respective provinces. These open textbook projects were necessary to address the high price of textbooks for students in Canada. 

    “With funding support from Government, our open textbook project has saved students in British Columbia in excess of CAD11 million dollars,” said Mary Burgess, Executive Director of BCcampus, “A growing number of colleges, institutes and universities are also implementing zero-textbook cost programmes (Zed Creds), and we look forward to sharing the lessons learned with our New Zealand colleagues through this partnership”.

    “Open education projects funded by the Ontario government have already saved Ontario students CAD4.5 million,” says Dr David Porter, Chief Executive Officer at eCampusOntario. “I am confident that the internationally recognised leadership in OER at Otago Polytechnic and the OER Foundation, headquartered in Dunedin, will contribute to the Centre’s success in replicating our achievements for the benefit of New Zealand learners”

    UNESCO will consider an OER Recommendation for adoption by member states at its General Conference in November, which if approved, will encourage monitoring of national progress with OER adoption. The Centre can play a supportive role in promoting New Zealand’s adoption of open education.

    No form of educational provision is more cost-effective, more scalable, and more sustainable than OER. Data derived over the last decade from the operation of the OER universitas (OERu) - an international collaboration of universities across five continents - shows that a small investment of $300,000 in annual operational costs can generate savings in excess of $98 million in government costs, along with corresponding reductions in student debt for New Zealand.

    Image credit: "The opposite of open is ..." by Alan Levine published under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

     

  • Otago Polytechnic to host inaugural Waste Jam (July 5 2019)

    Dunedin’s very first “Waste Jam” will be held this weekend at Otago Polytechnic.

    About 60 people will attend the two-day event at Otago Polytechnic’s Hub on Saturday and Sunday.

    The event aims to tackle issues around waste, as well as encourage people to seek funding for initiatives.

    “The Dunedin City Council allocates up to $40,000 per year for innovation and development in minimising waste,” Audacious student programme manager Rachel Butler says.

    “Collaborative projects are encouraged and it's clear this fund has the potential to create significant change in our city. Unfortunately, it receives very few applications. We hope to change that.”

    One of the facilitators for the event, Ray O'Brien, a Learning and Teaching Specialist at Otago Polytechnic, describes waste as “one of the great challenges of our time”.

    “No council, government or organisation is equipped to deal with it effectively on their. We all need to do our bit,” says Mr O’Brien, an academic facilitator for Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Leadership for Change programme.

    “A space to nurture new ideas, innovation and solutions”, Waste Jam involves two-person teams working to create solutions to minimise waste, which they will submit to council for funding.

    By bringing a selection of individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds, experiences, ages and industries for 48-hours, Waste Jam aims to rapidly explore ideas, projects, initiatives, and events that encourage, promote, or administer waste minimisation activities. 

    The event features a “human library”, comprising 20 experts from a range of industry fields (marketing, council policy, construction waste), who will provide guidance. Teams can book an expert for 15 minutes before they need to be returned to the library

    Throughout the event there will also be short talks from “Lightning speakers” who work in innovation in waste.

    These include: Sue Bidrose (CEO Dunedin City Council), Rachel Barker (CEO Plastics NZ), Deborah Manning (CEO Kiwiharvest), Finn Boyle (Project lead on Otago Polytechnic's new Organic Waste Resource Recovery Hub), Hilary Phipps (Head of Sustainability, University of Otago), Jim O'Malley (Dunedin City Councillor and deputy chair of the Infrastructure Committee), Nic McEwan (Managing Director McEwen Haulage).

    Waste Jam details:

    July 6-7, 9am-5.30pm Otago Polytechnic Hub

    Facilitators: Ray O'Brien (academic facilitator for Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Leadership for Change) and Alice Marsh (Co-founder of The Social Experiment).

  • Call for Abstracts: Educating the Workforce for the Future (July 5 2019)

    We invite submissions for presentations at the 7th Sino NZ Vocational Education and Training Model Symposium at Qingdao Technical College, China 14-15 October 2019.

    The theme for this year’s symposium is Educating the Workforce for the Future. Subthemes are:

    • Micro-credentials
    • Modern Apprenticeship
    • Soft skills
    • 1+X model (qualification plus skills certificates)

    Abstracts can be in English or Chinese. Abstracts must:

    • Not exceed 200 words
    • Speak to the theme and to one of the subthemes
    • Indicate whether the preferred format is a 15 minute oral presentation (including question time) or a 25 minute workshop
    • Be accompanied by a profile of presenter/s’ biographical and institutional information of no more than 200 words
    • Be received by the deadline of 16 August 2019 by email to su.bolland@op.ac.nz

    Abstracts will be peer reviewed. After the symposium abstracts will be published with presenters’ biographical information. Symposium registration is free for presenters.

    Registration is now open online.

    Travel subsidies

    1. Ten travel subsidies of $1000 per presentation are available for presenters from New Zealand Institutes of Technology, Polytechnics and Industry Training Organisations. Allocation of subsidies will be based upon quality of abstract, including alignment with the theme and subthemes, and achieving broad representation from the New Zealand institutions.
    2. We have additional funding for ten subsidies of $500 per presentation available for presenters to travel on to CACIE in Beijing and facilitate a related workshop on the afternoon of 17 October.

    Presenters wishing to be considered for travel subsidies should indicate this in their covering email when submitting their abstract.

    2019 Sino NZ symposium logos

     

  • Dunedin School of Art artists represented in Parkin Drawing Prize (July 4 2019)

    CONGRATULATIONS to Dunedin School of Art staff students and graduates who are well represented with finalists in Parkin Drawing Prize, New Zealand’s premier award for drawing. Congratulations and good luck to them all.

    Marion Wassenaar

    Madison Kelly

    Marie Strauss

    Elisabeth Vullings

    Tom Fox

    Emily Gordon

    Founded by arts patron, businessman and philanthropist Chris Parkin, the national drawing prize is now into its seventh year and has grown into a well recognised and not to be missed competition. From approximately 500 entries, a portfolio of around 80 works are chosen by a judging panel for the annual exhibition. In addition to the premier prize, another 10 highly commended prizes of $500.00 are awarded. For artists of all ages and abilities, the competition has come become an annual feature in the New Zealand Art calendar.

     

    > Read more about the finalists in the Parkin Drawing Prize here.

    (image: photo Jodie Gibson, Madison Kelly in her art school studio when she was a student, in 2016)

  • Artist Lynn Taylor's collaborative community practice (July 2 2019)

    The latest issue of "Resilient" in the Otago Daily Times features an article about print maker Lynn Taylor.

    Lynn Taylor frequently works with other artists in collaborative projects that invite community participation. These projects are shaped to explore themes of importance to that community with relationship to the environment. 

    Lynn has recently returned from an artistic residency in Port Union, New Foundland where she said climate change was apparent everywhere. Another project she took part in last year was the Art+Oceans project (the sixth in the series of Art+Science projects) where she worked on a collaborative project with Dr Jenny Rock and Dr Ro Allen on ocean acidification and the impacts on phytoplankton - essential to oxygen production in the world.

    She also has work currently touring in "Paradise Lost", an artist's book about Daniel Solander, a Swedish botanist who came out with Joseph Banks to record the plants of New Zealand during Captain Cook's first voyage to New Zealand. The exhibition is due to arrive in Dunedin in 2020.

     

    > Read the article here 

     

     

  • Maori students art collective exhibition for Puaka Matariki (July 2 2019)

    4-26 JULY, THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN

     

    Hōpua Whakaata Art Collection will celebrate the artistic success of tauira (students) at Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. Join them for the opening of Hōpua Whakaata, on Thursday July 4th at 5.30PM.

     

    Event organiser and artist Piupiu-Maya Turei says eighteen students from the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic will have work on display and available for sale. A wide range of  artworks from Māori students will be on display from copper wire sculpture to photographs, paintings, jewellery and textile work.

  • Staff Research: High Dimensional Data (July 1 2019)

    How might we benefit from analysis of large volumes of data?

    We live now in an age of continuous connection and interaction. As our society increasingly uses digitised technologies, our data is being collected whether we like it or not. The important question is how we use that data, including whether society as a whole will benefit from it.

    Marianne Cherrington, a Senior Lecturer in Applied Management, is undertaking research into machine-learning algorithms that will extract useful information from high dimensional data. When she did her first degree, in Mathematics and Statistics, she was working with data with five variables to select the two most informative. Now the processing power available is such that the algorithms she is working on are able to select the five most informative features out of 100,000 possible variables.

    These algorithms will be relevant in many fields, including business, education and health. Services will become more personalised because every interaction with a customer enhances our ability to understand that customer and predict what the customer wants or needs. For example health data gathered from wearable technologies might justify a discount on a health insurance premium, help to treat people in isolated areas like rural India, and reduce health costs in New Zealand by identifying issues sooner when they can be treated without hospital admission.

  • Public Lecture: Leandro Pisano - The Manifesto of Rural Futurism (July 1 2019)

    MONDAY 22 JULY, 10AM-12PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, REIGO ST, DUNEDIN.

    Liminaria / The Manifesto of Rural Futurism

    This lecture will examine and introduce to the audience the Manifesto of Rural Futurism, a document produced as a result of a collective thinking and practical process brought on by artists, scholars, curators, critics and people in the framework of Liminaria, a 5-year project sound art residency and fieldwork-based research platform aimed at developing “sustainable” cultural, social and economic networks in the some rural regions of Southern Italy.

     

    As final outcome of this project, the Manifesto of Rural Futurism is founded on a series of propositions aiming at rethinking rural areas and re-imagining their possible futures, understanding them as complex spaces actively immersed in the dynamism of encounters, flows and fluxes of contemporary geographies and critically questioning the modernistic discourses of capitalism and metropolitanism in which they are marginalised and considered as doomed to oblivion.

     

    Leandro Pisano is a curator, writer and independent researcher who is interested in intersections between art, sound and technoculture.

    He is founder and director of Interferenze new arts festival (2003) and frequently is involved in projects on sound art within rural territories, including Liminaria (2014-18). Leandro Pisano holds a PhD in Cultural and Post-Colonial Studies from University of Naples “L’Orientale”.

    website: www.leandropisano.it 

     

  • AIC Way newsletter out now (June 27 2019)

    The latest edition of your staff newsletter, AIC Way, is out now. In it you can read about recent events including Showcase 2019, as well as the achievements of some of our staff and students. Check your emails for your copy or read it here

  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • (June 26 2019)
  • Street poster exhibition highlights Ocean Acidification (June 26 2019)

    30 JUNE - 21 JULY, STREETS OF DUNEDIN NORTH and CHRISTCHURCH CENTRAL

     

    Street poster exhibition highlights Ocean acidification

     

    “If you said that plankton, the phytoplankton, the green oxygen-producing plankton in the oceans is more important to our atmosphere than the whole of the rainforest, which I think is true, people would be astonished." – Sir David Attenborough

     

    A poster campaign that aims to raise awareness about the health of our oceans is coming to Dunedin’s city centre streets.

    Check out our facebook page and tag a photo of yourself and the posters in your neighbourhood with #Ocean_Acidification, so we can raise the profile of this invisible consequence of global warming.

    The Art+Oceans Ocean Acidification Street Campaign, “Own The Streets” (30 June-21 July), is the sixth in a series of mini exhibitions to result from the original Art+Oceans Exhibition 2018, (a collaboration between Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art and Otago University’s Division of Sciences).

    Pam McKinlay, artist and event co-ordinator, says the event is being held as part of Puaka Matariki.  “It is a time to plan ahead for future harvests. It is also a time to reflect on what we do on land and the impacts we are having on the oceans – a time of care-taking as we face ocean warming, rising sea levels and ocean acidification in the realm of Takaroa-whaiariki.”

    The street exhibition, in conjunction with Phantom Billstickers, comprises central city “street gallery” sites featuring up to five framed posters. It is also being held concurrently in Christchurch. “The quality of the posters is due to the efforts and expertise of Meg Brasell-Jones, a Senior Lecturer in Communication Design at Otago Polytechnic."

    Each poster carries an ocean health label. McKinlay notes that the ocean absorbs between a quarter and a third of Earth’s carbon dioxide. “It produces half of the air we breathe. What we do on land has long-term and immediate impacts on our coastal and ocean environment – from water quality to long-term climate changes. I am hoping that people will care about that - its in our best self-interests.”

    Every second breath we take was made in the ocean. #Ocean_Acidification it will take your breath away.

     

    Details:

    The Art+Oceans Ocean Acidification Street Campaign, “Own the Streets”, runs from 30 June to 21 July

     

    Event launch: 

    The Dunedin/Ōtepoti celebration/Dunedin launch of the “Own the Streets” – Ocean Acidification Street Poster Campaign (an iteration of the Art+Oceans Exhibition 2019) will be held at Heron Hall (upstairs), Knox Church, on Friday 5 July, from 5.30pm


    The event features music from local musicians and performances by Ruth Evans, Beth Lynch, Trent Hawthorne and others and will be opened by Dr Christina McGraw, University of Otago, and  Commonwealth Ocean Acidification Action Group.

     

    Dr Christina McGraw, “There are many threats to the ocean, including warming, hypoxia (or low oxygen), overfishing, and ocean acidification (to name just a few). The degree of impact will be different for each region.

    Ocean acidification is a significant additional stressor for calcifying organisms and it will become more and more of an issue as we continue to pump carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere.”


    Participating artist details:

     

    JESSICA RITCHIE, “What Transpires from a Collection of Encounters” (with Candida Savage, scientist).

     

    THOMAS LORD and BLAIR THOMSON, “Marine microbial ecology” (with Blair Thomson, scientist).

     

    HOPE DUNCAN, “Jellyfish (will thrive)" (with Christina McGraw, scientist).

     

    MADISON KELLY, “Drawing to Discern Parasites” (with Colin MacLeod, scientist).

     

    PAM MCKINLAY and JESSE JAMES PICKERY, “Call of the Ocean” (With Anne-Marie Jackson et al).

     

    RUTH EVANS, “The great carbon trappers: how does ocean acidification affect diatoms?” (with Ro Allen, scientist).  

     

    Find exact street locations here

     

    (image credit: Madison Kelly, composite image from poster, Ocean Acidification Poster series, 2019)

  • OPAIC research on show (June 24 2019)

    Some of the best work coming out of Otago Polytechnic Auckland International Campus was on display on Friday night.

    Showcase 2019 brought students, staff and industry partners together for an evening of learning and networking.

    Our students talked guests through poster presentations about their research in fields including marketing, property, education, IT, construction, and sport.

    Management student Samuel Alonso, who picked up the best poster award on the night, researched the streamlining of the casual wage process.

    He looked at how a cross-department training programme could be used for staff at his placement company - MediaWorks.

    First runner up for Management, Farjana Rahman, researched customer relationship management at her placement company The Peace Foundation.

    She explored possible communication gaps between The Peace Foundation and its partner schools.

    The prize for first runner up for Information Technology went to Rushabh Master, Vishal Vadariya and their team, for their construction virtual reality demo.

    Their project was based on a virtual tour of a virtual earth house. It explained the concept of earth buildings, where walls are made up of different sustainable materials.

    Our guest speaker was Ira Munn, chief executive of Ierospace Industries International Limited, a company currently developing a 3D print electric vehicle kit.


    A number of our staff also gave presentations on the night, including a talk by Dr Nilufar Baghaei about how computer games can help young people learn to look after their health, and another by Omer Altaf about liquefaction hazard maps for the Lower Wairau Plains.

    Check out the photos here.

  • Public Exhibition: David Green - Bodies in Time (June 24 2019)

    July 22 - 26, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, P BLOCK, RIEGO STREET (OFF ALBANY ST)

    David Green

    Bodies in Time

    EXHIBITION DATES: July 22 - 26, 2019
    EXHIBITION OPENING: Tuesday, July 23 2019  -  5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin
    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday  - 10am – 4pm

     

    Bodies feed desires and needs, move toward and away, with rehearsed precision and in free-form. Bodies breach. Bodies collude to create larger bodies, often in assertion against other bodies. Bodies want, and want again.

     

    David Green collects videos from the internet, digitally eviscerates them, and then recomposes their constituents into scattered assemblages. His video proposition investigates two modes of bodies in action – political and sexual – in two manners: choreographed and improvisational, using projected light to split each view five ways in the gallery space.

     

    “Considering the behaviors of bodies might help us begin to grasp our larger embodied predicament”, says Green.

     

    Bodies in Time distils, fragments, and redistributes images of performing bodies to model aspects of the creatures we present ourselves as, and perhaps are, in the inescapably bounded world that our bodies are overwhelming.

  • Success Story: Kona Chen (June 20 2019)

    Information Technology graduate Kona Chen came to OPAIC to “reboot” himself.

    Kona was working as an IT developer back home in China but felt his knowledge was a bit limited.

    He decided the time was right to go to a new country, get some more knowledge about his field, learn about a different culture, and try to “reboot” or “recharge” himself.

    He looked into study options in a number of countries including Canada, Australia, and America. After doing some research, he decided New Zealand was the right place for him.

    Kona says New Zealand had a number of good schools he could apply to, and it was also an affordable destination.

    Another factor drawing him to New Zealand was the fact that his mum had spent six months here years ago.

    Kona says he enjoyed his Graduate Diploma in Information Technology here at OPAIC.

    “We had some cool projects related to VR – virtual reality.”

    He also liked the OPAIC staff, who later became his colleagues. He was hired to work for OPAIC’s ICT and Facilities Department for a period after he finished his study.

    Now Kona is working as a service consultant for Vista, a big IT company in New Zealand, which provides software solutions for cinemas.

    He’s been in the job nine months and enjoys the work.

    Kona also loves life in New Zealand. He especially likes the culture and he’s made some good friends here.

  • National Volunteer Week at OPAIC (June 19 2019)

    Students had the chance to explore volunteering opportunities in New Zealand at our mini-expo today. They heard from the Auckland City Mission, Girl Guiding New Zealand, graduate Anastasia Timoshkina, and student Eureka Fuentes. The event was part of National Volunteer Week, which celebrates the collective contribution of the 1.2 million volunteers who enrich Aotearoa New Zealand. The theme of this year’s volunteer week is Whiria te tangata – weaving the people together. Check out the photos here.

  • Otago Polytechnic student invited to international energy conference (June 18 2019)

    Conor Lawrence’s electrical engineering project is small in scale, but its potential spin-offs have earned the Otago Polytechnic learner an invitation to an international energy conference in Slovenia next month. 

    Conor (25), who is in the third and final year of a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Electrical) degree at Otago Polytechnic, has designed an “ionic propulsion system”, a flow of ions propelled by no fewer than 40,000 volts fired across two asymmetrical electrodes.

    The 7th International Youth Conference on Energy (IYCE), to be held in Bled, Slovenia, from 3-6 July, covers topics such as sustainable energy, environmental issues, high-voltage technology and power systems.

    Conor’s presentation at the conference will focus on applying his electrode configuration to a wing model and testing its performance in a wind tunnel.

    Conor believes the concept could help improve aerodynamics and lift, which would assist during take-offs as well as reduce fuel consumption and emissions.

    "When a high voltage is applied, it generates a jet-stream of ions," explains Conor, who is about to complete his studies and will graduate in December.

    Conor has been working on theories and prototypes since May 2018, having learnt about ionic propulsion from a lecturer. Previous iterations of his research and designs include an “ionic lifter” made of balsawood and copper wire.

    “I am beyond excited to have my paper accepted into an international conference.

    “When I first began my studies at Otago Polytechnic, I never thought that my studies would have led me to this opportunity.

    “I am very grateful to Otago Polytechnic for providing me with the opportunity to study electrical engineering and to research such a novel project such as ionic propulsion.

    “Otago Polytechnic’s Education Foundation is funding my trip to the conference, which is an awesome opportunity to meet with like-minded people and to learn about other topics as fascinating as ionic propulsion.

    “It will be super-exciting to get a glimpse into other people's research from around the world and see where the future of energy could be heading.”

    From Oamaru, Conor has been working part-time in the power distribution industry in his hometown and plans to take up a full-time offer once he finishes his studies at Otago Polytechnic.

    Read more about the 7th International Youth Conference on Energy

    Read more about our Bachelor of Engineering Technology programmes

  • Staff Research: Fog Computing (June 18 2019)

    How can time-sensitive data be processed most efficiently?

     It is expected that data processing will increasingly occur in the cloud, but sending large volumes of data to the cloud, for example from Internet of Things (IoT) devices, creates challenges in processing that data in a timely way. One solution, to reduce delays for processing time-sensitive data, is to perform at least the preliminary data analysis, near to where the data is generated. This network edge (the "Fog"), between end devices and traditional cloud computing data centers, is where the physical world meets the internet. The initial analysis in the Fog could include cleaning out redundant or invalid information, and filtering and aggregating data. 

    Dr Farhad Mehdipour, a Senior Lecturer at Otago Polytechnic's Auckland International Campus, is leading a research team with colleagues at the University of Auckland, Unitec, and Western Sydney University, which has proposed a solution called Fog-engine. IoT devices would be deployed in a Fog at the edge of the cloud. Several Fog engines can be deployed together to create a peer-to-peer network in a smart system. The Fog-engine functions as a gateway to the cloud for a cluster of IoT devices. Fog-engine consists of modular Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). Software-wise, all Fog-engines utilize the same API, which is also available in the cloud to ensure vertical continuity for IoT developers.

    One case study considered by the team was a smart home application including a heart rate monitoring and activity monitoring system. Using the Fog-engine the size of data transferred to the cloud could be reduced by 40%. 

  • Why it’s Good to Volunteer (June 18 2019)

    Did you know that 1.2 million people volunteer in New Zealand every year?

    To celebrate National Volunteer Week, OPAIC Employability Manager Andrew Tui caught up with student Eureka Fuentes and recent graduate Anastasia Timoshkina to ask them why they think volunteering is beneficial for international students. 

    What kinds of volunteering have you done before?

    Anastasia:  I have been a volunteer since I was in high school. My first experience was volunteering during the BMX Russian Championship. After that I volunteered for big sporting events like the World Canopy Piloting Championship. I also have experience volunteering with kids, elderly people, animal shelters and environmental projects.

    Eureka:  For the past three months I have worked as an Opportunity Shop Volunteer for the Red Cross. Prior to coming to New Zealand, I volunteered for fundraising events for international not-for-profit organisations. I also took part in church-related activities too.

    What did you decided to volunteer?

    Anastasia: A while ago I realised that one of the best ways to communicate is when a group of people are connected by a common activity. That was my initial goal when I started volunteering – to meet new people and to find new friends.

    Eureka: I had spare time and wanted to continue my passion working with not-for-profit organisations. I also found it a good way to integrate with local communities by meeting various people. It’s a rewarding experience since you can make a difference to the lives of people by sharing your time and abilities.  

    What are the benefits of volunteering?

    Eureka:  It helped me to integrate into the local culture. I have met many people with different perspectives who have inspired my journey as an International student. Study shows also that it’s good for your mental health knowing you’re making a difference in the community.  Volunteering can even enhance the employability of students as they become part of the labour market. 

    Anastasia:  You get a unique opportunity for self-improvement.  You help people and make the world around you a little bit better.  You gain experience with each new project and event, are able to add this experience to your CV, and ultimately build the foundation for your career. You can participate in big events in your country or overseas (Olympic Games, World Cup, Rugby Championship, etc).  You can also increase the chances of getting internships in local and international companies.

    What skills have you learnt from volunteering?

    Eureka: I had no prior experience in the retail industry so this gave me an opportunity to acquire new skills plus enhancing my skills in customer service. It allowed me to communicate in a new language and helped me adjust to hearing Kiwi accents.

    Anastasia: Volunteering enhances your soft transferable skills such as the ability to work in a team, initiative, proactivity, critical thinking, positive attitude, problem-solving, time-management abilities and flexibility. It helped me to improve my communication with international and local people, as well improving my English language skills. 

    How can students get involved, or find out more about volunteering?

    Eureka:  Join activities organised by the school that promotes volunteering. Search in websites for volunteering opportunities.  Visit not-for-profit organizations in your local area.  

    Anastasia:  Websites such as SEEK Volunteer and Student Job Search are really useful.  You can also contact Conservation Volunteers New Zealand and Volunteering Auckland for opportunities.

    National Volunteer Week celebrates the collective contribution of the 1.2 million volunteers who enrich Aotearoa New Zealand. #nvw2019

    National Volunteer Week 2019 runs from June 16-22. This year’s theme is “Whiria te tangata – weaving the people together”. Volunteering, Mahi Aroha and social action weave people and communities together.

    Join us this National Volunteer Week to stand together in our differences and choose to connect.

    Read more from Employability Manager Andrew Tui over on his blog.

  • Otago Polytechnic to become “tech heaven” for secondary schoolgirls (June 14 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic will become “tech heaven” for around 40 secondary schoolgirls from Dunedin and South Otago as part of the annual ShadowTech day on Tuesday 18 June.

    ShadowTech is an award-winning education programme organised by NZTech, providing schoolgirls in years 9 to 11 an opportunity to experience what working in a tech job is like, encouraging them onto education pathways that lead into tech related roles.

    The regional event, hosted by Otago Polytechnic, matches girls with female mentors in the tech industry. They’ll spend the day with their mentor, learning about the wide range of tech careers available and how I.T. is used in real-world business applications, before returning to Otago Polytechnic to hear inspiring speeches by industry experts.

    “We can’t wait to create tech heaven for these students and show them there’s more to technology than sitting behind a computer, writing lines of code all day” says Dr Emilie Crossley from Otago Polytechnic.

    “It would be fantastic to see some of the girls who are part of ShadowTech back here in a few years, studying one of our Information Technology programmes.”

    ShadowTech aims to encourage more girls to take science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) subjects at school, which can allow them to study technology at tertiary level and broaden their future career possibilities.

    Read more about our I.T. programmes

  • Otago Polytechnic Design student wins Chroma award (June 13 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Design learner David Macdonald has won the Student Comic Category at the Chroma Art Awards 2019, a national competition for graphic artists held in conjunction with independent arts festival Chromacon.

    David, who in his second year of study for a Bachelor of Design (Communication), won the category for the quality of his graphic novel, Copper Lens.

    He’d heard about the Chroma Art Awards “inadvertently” and submitted his book without thinking much about it at the time.

    “The night before the awards event (held on 1 June) I got an email letting me know that I’d won – and whether I could be in Auckland within 24 hours. I actually didn’t believe it at first,” David says.

    “It wasn’t until the next day, when I watched the live-stream and a presenter read out a short speech I had passed on, that it became real.”

    David, who grew up in Christchurch but now calls Nelson home, chose to enrol in a Bachelor of Design (Communication) at Otago Polytech because he wanted to develop his illustration skills and learn about all the “unknown unknowns”.

    “Looking back now, I realise I knew very little about what ‘design’ actually meant. Now I know how much there is yet to learn.

    “The Design department – and Otago Polytech as a whole – has always felt like a good space. The lecturers care about what they’re teaching and what we’re creating.

    “Being able to incorporate some of my own projects – such as using Copper Lens for a photography project – has been helpful for me.”

    David has already started a second graphic novel, refining “all the areas I thought needed brushing up on from Copper Lens”.

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

    Read more about Chromacon

    Read more about our Design programmes

     

  • Tautai Artist in Residence explores legacy of Pacific slave trade (June 13 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Dunedin School of Art 2019 Tautai Artist in Residence Jasmine Togo-Brisby this week celebrated the opening of an exhibition that examines the legacy of the Pacific slave trade.

    Togo-Brisby’s exhibition, Birds of Passage, is the culmination of a 12-week artist residency at the Dunedin School Art and the result of a partnership with Tautai, a national organisation dedicated to the development and ongoing support of Pacific arts and artists.

    A multi-disciplinary artist from Queensland, now living in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander who has ancestral lineage to the Vanuatu islands of Ambae and Santo.

    South Sea Islanders are the Australian-born descendants of Pacific Islanders forcibly taken from their homelands to Australia as a result of slave labour policies employed by the Australian government between 1863 and 1903.

    Togo-Brisby’s exhibition examines the historical practice of “blackbirding”, a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and the contemporary legacy that this practice has imparted on those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora.

    “The impetus of my artistic practice is my people, my culture – and creating works as a conduit to healing.”

    For Birds of Passage, Togo-Brisby has worked with two key mediums: photography and sculpture.

    The walls of the gallery hold a series of enlarged ambrotype portraits (printed on reflective vinyl) and a series of glass ambrotypes. Echoing the conventions of traditional European portraiture, mugshots from Pacific labour contracts and ethnographic imagery, Togo-Brisby inserts herself, her mother and her daughter as subjects.

    Although they seem not dissimilar to the proud photographic style adopted by so many 19th-century European colonialists, the artist offers both overt and subversive commentary by the inclusion of a schooner – a vessel often used to transport slaves – as either headdress or ornament.

    In the centre of the gallery space stand six black sculptural forms in the shape of sailing ships; comprised of crows’ wings, they are affixed to colonial-like wooden stands and, despite their bleak commentary, are darkly beautiful, too.

    Togo-Brisby says the use of crows’ wings is apt: the birds are abundant in North Queensland’s plantations, where many Pacific Islanders were forced to work.

    “It’s important for me to create work that my community can see themselves in,” she says.

    “The experience of our diaspora can be isolating, so I’m trying to create spaces for our stories to exist.

    “I’m creating material culture that is ours – that we can easily identify as our own.”

    *Jasmine Togo-Brisby, Tautai Artist in Residence, will present a public seminar on her work on Thursday 13 June, 12pm-1pm, at the Dunedin School of Art, Riego St, Dunedin.

    Exhibition details:

    Birds of Passage

    10-21 June, Dunedin School Of Art Gallery, Ground Floor, Reigo St, Dunedin

    Gallery hours: Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm

    Photo credit: Nadia Wilson

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

  • Marion Wassenaar Review in Art Seen (June 11 2019)

    In Art Seen this week - review ''The Anatomy of Plants'', Marion Wassenaar (Inge Doesburg Gallery) by James Dignan in the Otago Daily Times.

  • Michel Tuffery "Wild Creations" residency in Dunedin now exhibition (June 11 2019)

    New work from Michel Tuffery is currently on exhibition at the Artist's Room, Dunedin.


    Chapter 1, Moana Nga Manu, is new work from Michel's eight week residency, ‘Wild Creations’ awarded by Creative New Zealand and the Department of Conservation in 2018.

    This series of paintings and woodcuts captures his first observations drawn from Taiaroa Head and Rakiura, both key to the study of Pelagic birds, existing habitats and historical sites.


    "Nostalgically, I always wondered ‘where do the birds go’. This series of paintings and woodcuts captures my first observations drawn from Taiaroa Head and Rakiura, both key to the study of Pelagic birds, existing habitats and historical sites.

    Thematically the carved framework is a metaphor, for the korero and shared knowledge from the Tangata Whenua, DoC staff and scientists I engaged with throughout 2018.

    With an overwhelming source of visual material, Chapter 1, Moana nga Manu brings to light the first seven responses through the lens of seven paintings."

    Michel Tuffery was recognised as one of Dunedin School of Art's Distinguished Alumni at Otago Polytechnic in May, 2019.

    The exhibition opens Saturday 18 May 2019, at The Artist's Room Fine Art Gallery, 2 Dowling Street, Dunedin.

    Created with the support of Creative New Zealand, and the Wild Creations Fund from the Department of Conservation. 

    Wild Creations is a fusion of conservation and creativity, supporting artists to be inspired by experiencing the places, people, and stories of New Zealand’s unique natural environment and cultural heritage.

     

    Read more in the Arts feature of the ODT.

     

  • Public Seminar: Jasmine Togo-Brisby: Tautai Artist in Residence (June 11 2019)

    This week's seminar - THUR 13 JUNE, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby: Tautai Artist in Residence

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander, whose great-great-grandparents were taken from Vanuatu as children and put to work on an Australian sugarcane plantation. Togo-Brisby's research examines the historical practice of 'blackbirding', a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and its contemporary legacy and impact upon those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora. Based in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is one of the few artists delving into the cultural memory and shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific, her practice encompassing painting, early photographic techniques and processes, and sculpture.

  • Otago Polytechnic introduces Otago Hockey scholarships (June 6 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic and Otago Hockey have announced a sponsorship and scholarship agreement that supports students’ academic and sporting aspirations, while also providing a significant boost to the code in the region.

    The scholarships, which will be offered to two talented hockey players, cover a maximum of three years study, depending on the specific programme.

    Scholarship applications are now open. They close on 31 July and will take effect from the beginning of 2020.

    The scholarships are performance-based: recipients must meet the entry criteria for their programme of study and are required to pass 70% of their programme each year; they are also required to consistently perform at a high (representative) sporting level.

    “Sports scholarships like these allow hockey to present the option of study to young up-and-coming athletes from around Otago and New Zealand,” says Megan Gibbons, Acting Deputy Chief Executive Learner Experience, Otago Polytechnic.

    “This has to be good for both our local and regional sport and the education providers in the city.

    “It is evident from the recent naming of eight Southern players in the New Zealand under-21 men’s hockey squad that we have excellent pathways to high performance right here in Dunedin.”

    Otago Hockey General Manager Andy McLean says the initiative is exciting news for young hockey players throughout New Zealand.

    “Dunedin is a fantastic place to combine tertiary education and sporting ambition.

    “The hockey turf is adjacent to Otago Polytechnic’s Student Village, Te Pā Tauira, and Otago Polytechnic’s campus is just across the road. And High Performance Sport New Zealand is just around the corner at the stadium. It is pretty special,” McLean says.

    “Otago Hockey is a close-knit community. Current New Zealand Under-18 coach Hymie Gill is our Pathway Manager and Dunedin is one of six locations proposed to host a High-Performance Centre.

    “We are building a fantastic environment for assisting athletes to realise their goals,” McLean says.

    “Applications for the scholarships are now open and will close at the end of July, following the New Zealand under-18 hockey tournament, which is being held in Wellington,” McLean says.

    “We are looking for well-rounded, hard-working individuals who will add significant value – on and off the hockey turf.”

    Otago Polytechnic has also agreed to be a significant brand partner of Otago Hockey.

    As a result, Otago Polytechnic has secured naming rights to the playing turf closest to the pavilion at Harbour Terrace. Otago Hockey now features Otago Polytechnic branding on its signage, vehicles and representative team uniforms.

    Read more about our hockey scholarships

     

  • Public Seminar: Natalie Smith - Fraser Crowe, “Art as Fashion, Fashion as Art” 20 Years On  (June 5 2019)

    THUR 6 JUNE, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Natalie Smith: From Formality to Fluidity: Fraser Crowe, “Art as Fashion, Fashion as Art” 20 Years On 

     

    In 1998 an article on the fashion label Fraser Crowe appeared in Art New Zealand, the title of the article, “Art as Fashion, Fashion as Art: Deborah Crowe and Kim Fraser” spoke to the interchangeability, or fluidity, of the borders and boundaries between the two worlds.

    Author, Mark Kirby, noted that  Crowe and Fraser’s collaborative designs were considered unusual because they were conceptually based and did not fit “any of the customary fixed fashion categories.”  The designs reflected the duo’s backgrounds, Fraser has a background in fashion design, while Crowe has a background in fibre and sculpture.  In 1997 Fraser Crowe won the  Supreme Award at the Benson & Hedges Smokefree Fashion Design Awards (BHSFDA) for Dual Outlook a garment made from a copper sheath with a woven visor, the design prophetically conceptualised the future – a future where we would need to cocoon ourselves from the onslaught of digital communication.    Using Fraser Crowe as a case study this paper explores how, 20 years on, the relationship between art and fashion is now more fluid than ever. 

     

    Natalie Smith is a teaching fellow in Sociology, Gender Studies and Criminology and a Lecture in Art History and Visual Culture at the University of Otago.  Her primary areas of research interest are New Zealand fashion design and the social and cultural factors that influence design.  She is particularly interested in the relationship between gender, work and design; craft; textile design; and the art/fashion nexus.  Natalie has a longstanding interest in arts governance and has served on the boards of several not-for-profit arts organizations in Aotearoa New Zealand.

  • Exhibition: Jasmine Togo-Brisby - Tautai Artist in Residence (June 5 2019)

    10-21 JUNE, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, REIGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby

    Birds of Passage

     

    EXHIBITION DATES: 10 - 21 June, 2019
    EXHIBITION OPENING: 10 June, 2019, 5-7PM

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    > READ MORE in the Otago Daily Times

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander, whose great-great-grandparents were taken from Vanuatu as children and put to work on an Australian sugarcane plantation. Togo-Brisby's research examines the historical practice of 'blackbirding', a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and its contemporary legacy and impact upon those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora. Based in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is one of the few artists delving into the cultural memory and shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific, her practice encompassing painting, early photographic techniques and processes, and sculpture.

    Tautai Artist Residency: This triennial Pacific Residency supports artists as advocates for Tautai and Contemporary Pacific Art. It receives funding from Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust who send out an Open Call for expressions of interest every three years. 

  • Exhibition: Jasmine Togo-Brisby Tautai Artist in Residence (June 5 2019)

    10-21 JUNE, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby
    Birds of Passage

    EXHIBITION DATES: 10 - 21 June, 2019
    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

     

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander, whose great-great-grandparents were taken from Vanuatu as children and put to work on an Australian sugarcane plantation. Togo-Brisby's research examines the historical practice of 'blackbirding', a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and its contemporary legacy and impact upon those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora. Based in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is one of the few artists delving into the cultural memory and shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific, her practice encompassing painting, early photographic techniques and processes, and sculpture.

     

    Tautai Artist Residency: This triennial Pacific Residency supports artists as advocates for Tautai and Contemporary Pacific Art. It receives funding from Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust who send out an Open Call for expressions of interest every three years. 

  • ITP symposium proceedings (June 4 2019)

    We are pleased to announce the joint publication of the 2019 ITP Research Symposium Proceedings. The symposium was co-hosted by Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) and Otago Polytechnic, and was held at the EIT Taradale campus on 15 and 16 April 2019.

    Our selection of whanaungatanga as a core theme for the symposium, with a focus on community centred research, reflected the unique contribution Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) make to knowledge creation and cultural development in New Zealand; as centres of applied research and creativity, engaging with a broad range of communities across New Zealand. Whanaungatanga both embraces our sense of close connection between people, our kinship spanning Aotearoa New Zealand, and our deep commitment to Te Ao Māori in all facets of our activity.

    During the conference our participants presented papers spanning four key themes, each of which is of significant interest to ITPs in New Zealand: community health and wellbeing which encompassed a broad range of papers examining our applied research focusing on enhancing wellbeing in our communities; engaged arts which encompassed both exhibitions by artists working at ITPs across New Zealand and papers examining the arts in New Zealand; inspired teaching and learning which explored the development of teaching from early childhood to tertiary teaching; and sustainable environments which explored the key role played by ITPs in the sustainable development of our regions. Kaupapa Māori research was embedded within each of the streams.

    Overall, the symposium provided a wonderful insight into the unique contribution ITPs make to research in New Zealand and demonstrated the richness and breadth of research undertaken by ITPs in New Zealand. We would like to thank all those who participated in and contributed to the Symposium.


    Professor Leoni Schmidt, Otago Polytechnic
    Associate Professor Jonathan Sibley, EIT

  • New study block gets underway (May 30 2019)

    Our latest batch of new students are getting to know about New Zealand life.

    The students are taking part in a range of Orientation activities this week including talks, workshops and performances.

    Senior staff formally welcomed the new arrivals to the campus today.

    Executive Director: Academic Alex McKegg said, "It wont all be easy in fact it will be hard. Studying is a challenge. Being away from home in a new country is a challenge. So if you need help you must ask. Ask your lecturer if it is about your study, or if its something else you may want to ask for help from our student success team or learning support staff.

    Please remember. This is your journey. You are the brave and adventurous ones who have taken this step to come here. Be curious, be persistent, take charge of your learning. Take charge of your future; set high standards for yourselves, and ask for help. That’s what we are here for."

    Students also met the Student Success Team yesterday morning, and learned about some of issues the team can assist with.

    Yesterday’s activities also included a talk about positive wellbeing strategies and tips for dealing with stress and transitioning to life in a new country.

    Employability Manager Andrew Tui gave a brief introduction to our employability programme, which helps students get ready to work.

    In the afternoon, students listened to presentations by New Zealand Police and Southern Cross Travel Insurance.

    The day ended with a Maori Cultural Performance by The Haka Experience (Te Wehi Haka).

    Today students were introduced to their programmes. Heads of Departments went over programme requirements and academic expectations.

    This was followed by an Employability Afternoon made up of a series of workshops designed to improve employability and introduce strategies for finding work.

  • The Anatomy of Plants (June 1 2019)

    1-22 JUNE, INGE DOESBURG GALLERY, 6 CASTLE ST, DUNEDIN

    Marion Wassenaar
    The Anatomy of Plants - Celebrating the Brendel Anatomical Model Collection from the Department of Botany, University of Otago.

     

    Exhibition dates: 1 - 22 June 2019
    Exhibition preview and opening: Friday May 31st, 5.30 - 7pm 
    Gallery hours: Thursday & Friday 1 - 5pm, Saturday 12 - 2pm
    After hours: 021 217 8444

  • Chinese agent workshop (May 24 2019)

    We had the pleasure of hosting more than 80 Chinese onshore agents at our campus yesterday.

    Our agent partners help our international students to select their programmes of study and enrol with us.

    Yesterday we gave the agents a tour of our Queen Street campus.

    They also had the opportunity to meet our Chief Executive Gagan Sachdeva, and our academic department heads who gave them an overview of our programmes.

    Check out the photos over on Facebook.

  • Otago Polytechnic wins Rainbow Award (May 21 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic has won the Simpson Grierson Impact Award at the inaugural Rainbow Excellence Awards.

    We were also finalists in a range of categories at the awards, which were held in Auckland on Friday 17 May.

    Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive Phil Ker was a finalist for the Leadership Award, Proud@OP Facilitator Stuart Terry was a finalist for the Ambassador Award, and Otago Polytechnic was nominated for the Supreme Award.

    The judges said: “Since receiving the Rainbow Tick, Otago Polytechnic has made significant strides across their organisation when it comes to Rainbow Inclusion … demonstrating that the policy, programmes, and systems Otago Polytechnic have put in place are making an impact to Rainbow Inclusion every day.”

    The judges also noted that Otago Polytechnic was the first New Zealand polytechnic, and one of the first organisations in the South Island, to receive the Rainbow Tick.

    Stuart says he is delighted that Otago Polytechnic has been honoured with an award.

    “Our message of diversity and inclusiveness goes beyond our staff to our 8800 students, whānau and the wider community.”

    Otago Polytechnic is also proud to announce that students are able to indicate “gender diverse” on their application and enrolment forms.

    Chief Executive Phil Ker says Otago Polytechnic petitioned the Tertiary Education Commission in an effort to get consistency across Government agencies.

    “It has been possible to use a third gender option, ‘X’, on passports since December 2012. Yet students enrolling in tertiary institutions have not been legally entitled to state a third gender option until April 2019, due to issues with the National Student Index number.

    “The April 2019 Single Data Return (SDR) to the Tertiary Education Commission enables the reporting of a third gender option – ‘D’ for gender diverse.

    “This is significant for Otago Polytechnic as it means students can legitimately state that they are gender diverse on application and enrolment forms.”

    About the Rainbow Excellence Awards

    The Rainbow Excellence Awards celebrate workplace leadership, innovation, best practice and collaboration. The awards programme brings all current and aspiring Rainbow Tick organisations together to showcase best practice and celebrate outstanding progress as we continue to strive towards a more inclusive community of workplaces in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Find out more

    About the Rainbow Tick

     The Rainbow Tick demonstrates that organisations accept and value people in the workplace.

    Find out more

  • Student Testimonial: Gertrude Appiagyei (May 20 2019)

    Postgraduate student Gertrude Appiagyei is enjoying the peaceful lifestyle here in New Zealand.

    Gertrude came from Ghana, a country of 28 million people, to New Zealand, which has under five million.

    She says she loves it here in Auckland and particularly likes that there are people from a lot of different backgrounds.

    “It’s a very highly multicultural city and it’s peaceful.”

    There’s even a small community of Ghanaians here, she says.

    Friends back home love seeing Gertrude’s posts on social media. Now they want to come and see New Zealand for themselves.

    “It’s a good country and anything you see in US or UK, it’s also here,” says Gertrude.

    Gertrude worked as a primary school teacher for six years back in Ghana and completed a Bachelor of Science in business administration there focusing on marketing.

    She came to New Zealand to join her husband who was completing his PhD here, then started looking for a qualification that would complement her bachelor’s degree.

    OPAIC offered the most suitable programme- the Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Management.

    Gertrude says she loves the programme. The lecturers are very helpful and guide students through their assignments.

     “We learn in teams and that’s one very good thing about the course.”

    Gertrude and her husband enjoy living in a quiet suburb of Auckland but she also likes coming into the city centre for her classes.

    Hear Gertrude speak about her OPAIC experience over on Youtube.

  • Pink Shirt Day (May 17 2019)

    Today we took part in Pink Shirt Day to show our commitment to creating a positive, welcoming and inclusive environment. Thanks to all the students and staff who got involved. Check out the photos over on Facebook.

  • Dunedin Techweek a hive of innovation (May 17 2019)

    From Minecraft coding secrets to multiplayer gaming, edgy design solutions and innovation approaches to education, Dunedin Techweek offers a mixture of hands-on entertainment as well as opportunities to learn and gain insights into a rapidly expanding world.

    The May 20-26 event is a free, collaborative showcase involving Otago Polytechnic, the University of Otago Business School, Signal ICT Grad School, Enterprise Dunedin and a range of Dunedin businesses.

    The first Techweek in Dunedin in 2017 featured just one event. That grew to 45 events last year, attended by more than 2000 people and involving 92 speakers and 27 venues.

    This year sees the return of TEXpo, a showcase of local innovative tech research, products and technology industries that is set to provide a buzz of activity, energy and ideas.

    Feedback from TEXpo exhibitors last year was overwhelmingly positive, many of them taking the opportunity to network with other tech companies, while visitors enjoyed the opportunity to discover the range of exciting technology in our city.

    Read more about TEXpo 2019

    Read the schedule for Dunedin Techweek

  • Success celebrated at graduation ceremony (April 13 2018)

    More than 150 OPAIC students from all over the world graduated at a ceremony at Auckland’s Town Hall this afternoon.

    Chair of the Otago Polytechnic Council Kathy Grant addressed the graduates, congratulating them on their success. She said a mixture of domestic students and international students from 15 different nationalities were graduating today.

    Qualifications completed by domestic students through Capable NZ included Bachelor of Applied Management, Bachelor of Social Services, Master of Professional Practice and Graduate Diploma in Professional Practice.

    International students completed a range of qualifications including Graduate Diplomas in Applied Management, Accounting, Hotel Management, Information Technology, and Sales and Marketing.

    Other qualifications awarded included National Diplomas in Construction Management and Quantity Surveying, Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Management, Bachelor of Applied Management and Master of Applied Management.

    "The campus, I know, has been enriched by the diversity, the personal attributes and the unique qualities of you all,” said Ms Grant.

    Former Black Cap and Otago Polytechnic alumni Grant Elliott was the guest speaker at this afternoon’s event. He talked about the trials and tribulations of success and urged listeners to talk about their hardships as well as celebrating their successes.

    Failings and hardships helped people learn and grow and made them stronger, said Mr Elliot.

  • AIC Way out now (May 15 2019)

    The latest edition of AIC Way is out now. Check your inbox for your copy or read it online here

  • Nursing graduate to attend WHO Assembly (May 14 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Nursing graduate Hayley Lotter is one of only 30 nurses worldwide to be selected to attend the World Health Organisation’s Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Hayley, who graduated from Otago Polytechnic in 2017, was selected for a Nursing Now Scholarship for new graduates.

    She will represent nurses from the Western Pacific region at the 72nd Session of the World Health Assembly from 20-28 May.

    Nursing Now is a three-year initiative launched by the International Council of Nurses to raise awareness of the importance of nursing on a global scale.

    Speaking from Christchurch, where she works in a dual role that has a strong focus on Māori primary healthcare, Hayley says the Nursing Now Scholarship is a great learning opportunity.

    The scholarship involves a four-day conference immediately before the WHO Assembly that includes workshops with a range of primary healthcare experts.

    “I’m really looking forward to discussing our approaches to nursing and comparing that with how others do things.

    “We have also been invited to sit in on the full WHO Assembly for three days. So, all up, I’m in Geneva for seven days.”

    Read more about our Nursing programmes

    Read more about Nursing Now

  • Public Seminar: Andrew McStay - How To Live Well with Emotional AI (May 13 2019)

    THUR 16 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Andrew McStay: How To Live Well with Emotional AI: Creativity

    Emotions are inextricable from human experience and sit at the heart of artistic production. This seminar discusses and invites conversation on emotional AI, or technologies that use affective computing and artificial intelligence techniques to sense, learn about and interact with human emotional life. Drawing on ongoing research and collaborative work with electronic artist Ronan Devlin, McStay will outline what emotional AI technologies are, how we may theorise these, and ways in which they may be used by artists and creative practitioners. The second part of the seminar will collaboratively address what it means to sense and interact with emotion, opportunities for artists, ethical concerns about use of such data, and what creativity means in context of automated production and AI.

    Andrew McStay is Professor of Digital Life at Bangor University (UK) and the 2019 William Evans Fellow. This is the second session in the ‘How To Live Well in Emotional AI’ series presented on the Otago campus and organised by The Brandbach, the creative industries specialisation of the University of Otago.

  • Big rise in number of women in automotive and mechanical engineering programmes (May 10 2019)

    An unprecedented number of women are enrolled in automotive and mechanical engineering programmes at Otago Polytechnic this year.

    Seven women are enrolled in our New Zealand Certificate in Automotive Engineering (Level 3) programme; four in the Certificate in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering (Level 2); and the Otago Secondary Tertiary School Automotive (Motor Industry) (Level 2) programme has three young women.

    In addition, three women are enrolled in our New Zealand Certificate in Mechanical Engineering (Level 3) programme.

    “On top of that, we have four or five young women doing apprenticeships,” says Hamish Miller, Senior Lecturer and Programme Manager of Otago Polytechnic’s Automotive programmes.

    “So they are out in the workforce. They have taken that next step, and have been accepted by an employer.”

    Hamish says the number of women enrolled this year has increased by up to 50% on the previous year.

    In the past the intake had been as low as one or two.

    Hamish works closely with industry to ensure students are given the skills they need to match the current automotive industry climate.

    “It’s great to see a rise in the number of women getting into such trades,” he says.

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

    Read more about our Trades programmes

  • Tertiary Open Day offers something for everyone (May 7 2019)

    From free massage to hair styling, architecture and design stalls to tours of the Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic’s Tertiary Open Day offered something for everyone.

    Hundreds of high school students descended on Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin campus on Sunday and Monday 6-7 May to check out the wide range of programmes on offer.

    There was a great buzz on campus as students got to experience interactive exhibits, including chair massages, hair makeovers, art workshops, stadium tours and a smoothie-making bike!

    Of those surveyed (70 prospective students), 94% said Tertiary Open Day helped them to think more deeply about possible careers and study options.

    Read the ODT article

     

  • Success Story: Karan Kikani (May 7 2019)

    Karan Kikani gained valuable web development experience during his time at OPAIC, which he now uses in his job with Envision Creative.

    Karan is from Surat, Gujarat, India. He studied the Bachelor of Computer Application at Veer Narmad South Gujarat University before coming to OPAIC.

    He says that after the finishing his degree he had one goal - to study in New Zealand - the best country in the world.

    “I chose OPAIC because it is a big institute with several campuses and some of my friends gave good feedback regarding the school.”

    He says one of the best parts about studying at OPAIC was the teachers. He received a lot of help from them, particularly during the mini-project he completed with travel company Travel Corner in his final study block.

    One of his favourite areas of study was web development. He already had some web development experience and his study at OPAIC helped him expand on that knowledge. Now he’s working as a Web Developer at Envision Creative.

    Karan says OPAIC’s IT courses prepare students for jobs on the skill shortage list such as software engineer and web developer, and New Zealand offers many opportunities to advance your career.

    Some of the best things about New Zealand are the friendly people, the weather and the food, he says. He likes visiting the local beaches and gets to Mission Bay near the city at least once a week.

    Karan’s also enjoyed venturing out of the city to the seaside town of Paihia, and Cape Reinga at the very top of the North Island.

    Hear Karan speak about his OPAIC experience on YouTube.

  • Call for Papers: Scope - Fashion issue (May 6 2019)

    We are pleased to announce our call for papers and proposals for the next special issue of Scope: Contemporary Research Issues (Art & Design) 18 - Fashion to be published in November 2019.

    Reflecting the diversity of contexts in which fashion operates, is studied and practiced, the theme of this issue is ‘Fashion Fluid’. Authors are encouraged to consider this theme broadly and we welcome submissions from all fields and disciplines that contribute to critical debates and new understandings of fashion and the fashion system.

    We are open to a range of formats for inclusion, including: articles, perspectives, essays, designer pages, exhibition reviews, project reports, photo essays. Proposals for other formats will also be considered.

    Your submission should include a 300 word abstract with clear title and up to 5 key words. Please also include a short biography, including your institutional position and affiliation (where relevant); and contact information (postal, email and telephone number). Please ensure this is provided as a separate sheet from the abstract for review purposes.

    For publication, all photographs require written copyright permission. Consent forms are available on request. Please include low resolution images for the submission. Please note that final images for publication need to be high resolution (300dpi), CMYK images.

    Acceptance for inclusion will reflect an expectation for high standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to the Chicago referencing style. For more information, please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style and consult prior issues for examples. www.thescopes.org.

    All submissions will undergo double blind peer review.

    Submissions should be sent to Pip McQuillan.

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Health & Wellbeing) (May 6 2019)

    We are calling for papers for Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Health & Wellbeing) 4 on the theme Rural.

    This issue will provide the opportunity for authors from different disciplines to consider, discuss and debate how the ‘rural’ is understood in relation to health and wellbeing. Papers presented will showcase work drawn from the areas of nursing, medicine, occupational health, sociology, sport, counselling, geography, education, and narrative with a focus on research and community projects which attempt to (re)build and (re)foster the dialogue and engagement of health, wellbeing in the ‘rural’.  

    Submissions should be sent in hardcopy and electronic format by 31 July 2019 for review and potential inclusion in the annual issue to Associate Professor Jean Ross (Editor) at Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini Ki Otago, Private Bag 1910, Dunedin, New Zealand. Submissions should engage with contemporary health practices in ways which may contribute to critical debate and new understandings. High standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to consistency through the APA 6th edition referencing style are expected.

    Formats include: editorials; articles; perspectives; essays; imagery and conference reports; reports on and reviews of projects, residencies and publications. Other suggested formats will also be considered; and special topics comprising submissions by various contributors may be tendered to the editor/s. All material will be published both in hardcopy and online. A short biography of no more than 50 words; title; details concerning institutional position and affiliation; contact information (email & telephone number) provided on a cover sheet. Low resolution images with full captions should be inserted into texts to indicate where they would be preferred; while high resolution images should be sent separately.

  • Public Seminar: Queering the Institutional Space (May 6 2019)

    THUR 30 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Queering the Institutional Space

    In this panel discussion, activist Hahna Briggs, artist Sorawit Songsataya and art writer / curator Robyn Maree Pickens will discuss Emma Chalmers' exhibition Intersecting Architectures, on at the Dunedin School of Art from May 20th - May 31st 2019. Emma's exhibition and the attendant publication will consider queer history and culture in Dunedin; the opening up of institutional spaces to the LGBTQI+ community; the connection between sexuality and intersectionality and the potentialities of a utopian queer future (inspired in particular by José Esteban Muñoz’s essay ‘Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity’). 

     

    Hahna Briggs has a Masters in Dance Studies and was the 2013 Caroline Plummer Community Dance Fellow. She currently runs inclusive dance classes and performances for people with and without disability through Gasp! Dance Collective. Hahna has worked for OUSA Student Support for 4 and a half years, first as the Queer Support Co-ordinator and now as the Senior Student Advocate. In addition, Hahna is a member of the Dunedin Pride Inc Management committee.

     

    Robyn Maree Pickens is an art writer, curator and text-based practitioner. Her critical and creative work is centred on the relationship between aesthetic practices and ecological reparation. Robyn's art writing has appeared in Art Asia Pacific online, ANZJA, Art + Australia online, The Pantograph Punch and Art New Zealand. Her most recent curatorial project was presented at Blue Oyster ("Bright Cave" 2018) and her most recent text-based work was exhibited at Te Tuhi (December 2018 - March 2019). Currently Robyn is a PhD candidate in ecological aesthetics at the University of Otago and an art reviewer for the Otago Daily Times and Art News. 

     

    Sorawit Songsataya was born in Chiang Mai, Thailand and lives and works in ¯Otepoti Dunedin. Primarily interested in craft, textiles, digital modality, handmade and machine-made objects, Sorawit’s practice forms at the intersection of digitised labour and traditional craftsmanship, exploring the intricacy of what it means to “make” today. In 2018 he was awarded the Iaspis Studio Residency, Stockholm, Sweden and the McCahon House artist residency, T¯amaki Makaurau Auckland. In February 2019, Sorawit stayed at the historic Rita Angus cottage as part of Enjoy Public Art Gallery Summer Residency programme. Sorawit has a Master of Fine Art from Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland (2013). Previous exhibitions include Art and Shops, Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Bright Cave, Blue Oyster Art Project Space, ¯Otepoti Dunedin (2018); Soon Enough: Art in Action, Tensta Konstall, Stockholm (2018); Starling, Artspace, T¯amaki Makaurau Auckland (2018); Acting Out, Adam Art Gallery Te P¯ataka Toi, Te Whaganui-a-Tara Wellington (2017); Potentially Yours: The Coming Community, Artspace, T¯amaki Makaurau Auckland (2016); The Non-living Agent, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts, T¯amaki Makaurau Auckland (2016).

  • Public Exhibition + Artist talk and Panel Discussion - gender, sexuality and power (May 6 2019)

    21 - 31 MAY, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, 19 REIGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Emma Chalmers
    Intersecting Architectures Exhibition


    In this exhibition Emma Chalmers considers the way gender, sexuality and power are embedded, framed and played out within an institutional space. Referencing the architectures of both the home and Elam School of Art, where she recently completed her Masters, she invites the viewer to imagine what an un-doing of power hierarchies and forms of exclusion might look like. Via a series of repurposed windows, she’s created a space for imagining collectively, a place to reach out towards new horizons. These spaces – symbolic and physical – are not simply gestures or places to reflect on what could be, they help us see what binds us.

    This exhibition is an opportunity for Dunedin's LGBTQI+ and wider community to consider issues around acceptance, diversity and inclusivity within this local context and to engage in a creative, community-oriented series of events.

    There will be an attendant publication comprised of two essays. The first will consider queer history and culture in Dunedin, featuring an interview with Hahna Briggs (former Queer Support Co-Ordinator at OUSA Student Support). The second essay will analyse Chalmers' exhibition with reference to the potentialities of a utopian queer future, as inspired by José Esteban Muñoz’s essay ‘Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity’. Publications will be sold for $5-$10 each with all proceeds going to Queer Support.


    EVENTS:

    Exhibition dates: 21 - 31 May.

    Exhibition hours: Monday - Friday 10am - 4pm, Saturday 25th May 10am - 4pm

    Exhibition Opening: Tuesday 21st May, 5pm - 7.00pm at the Dunedin School of Art

    Artist’s talk: Wednesday 22nd May, 12pm - 12.30pm at the Dunedin School of Art

    Panel Discussion: Thursday 30th May at 12pm - 1pm at the Dunedin School of Art
    with Sorawit Songsataya, Robyn Maree Pickens and Hahna Briggs

     

  • Winners at the Cleveland National Art Awards (May 6 2019)

    Congratulations to Philip Madill on winning the Supreme Award at the bi-annual Cleveland Charitable Foundation Awards.

    Congratulations also to Anita DeSoto, Kylie Matheson Artist and Meteria Turei on also receiving awards.

    The Cleveland National Art Awards is a biennial exhibition kindly sponsored by The Cleveland Charitable Foundation. There is a $10,500 prize pool for artists entered in the exhibition. This Otago Art Society exhibition will run from the 4th of May until the 15th of June 2019.

    Read more in the Otago Daily Times....

    For images of all the award winning works see the Otago Art Society facebook page
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/OtagoArtSociety/posts/

     

    (image: Kylie Matheson, Safe, 2019, Paper clay with Satin glaze. 25cm x 25cm x 30cm)

     

  • Public Seminar: Lucy Hammond - Contemporary approaches to curating collections (May 6 2019)

    THUR 9 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Space makers: Contemporary approaches to curating collections

    This seminar will offer a short overview of the DPAG collection and its history and development, and then discuss curatorial approaches to exhibition making and working with this collection. Lucy will use a series of different exhibitions as case studies, including Space Suit (2018), Gordon Walters: New Vision (2017-18) and Marie Shannon: Rooms found only in the home, discuss more generally the approach to staging exhibitions at DPAG and the role of collaboration in curatorial practice.

     

    Lucy Hammond is a curator and writer based in Ōtepoti/Dunedin. She is the Curator at Dunedin Public Art Gallery, with research interests extending across contemporary and historic art, craft and design. Recent curatorial projects include New Networks: Contemporary Chinese Art (2018-19), Gordon Walters: New Vision (2017-18), and Marie Shannon: Rooms found only in the home (2017). She is widely published,, and a contributing writer to the 2017 publication Gordon Walters: New Vision, which was shortlisted in the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards and winner of the AAANZ 2018 Best Large exhibition catalogue. She is a judge for the illustrated non-fiction category in the 2019 Ockham New Zealand Book awards, and is presently working across a range of contemporary and historic projects in her role at DPAG.

  • Graduate address: DJ Forbes (May 3 2019)

     All Blacks Sevens star DJ Forbes compares completing a tertiary qualification to winning a medal or a big game.

    Forbes graduated with his Master of Professional Practice at this week’s ceremony and gave the student address on behalf of Capable NZ graduates.

    DJ has appeared in 512 games, 89 tournaments, and won six World Series in Rugby Sevens.

    Near the end of his career he started thinking about life after rugby, and a chance meeting introduced him to the Capable NZ programme. He completed his Bachelor of Applied Management then continued onto his Master of Professional Practice.

    Forbes said he’d played for the All Blacks Sevens team for over a decade and captained the side to gold at the Commonwealth Games. Yet graduating was easily one of his biggest achievements.

    “I could compare it to winning a gold medal or a big game.”

     He talked about sleepless nights struggling through books and articles.

     “So let me be the first one to confirm that the resilience and work ethic each and every single one of you graduates here today would have had to showcase in order to get to this point was no different from what me and my teammates have demanded from each other in professional sport at the highest level.”

     DJ juggled his study with his transition to life after rugby, a new job, and two young children. It was a recipe for disaster, but he succeeded thanks to the guidance of awesome facilitators who treated obstacles as opportunities.

    He said Graduation day was about acknowledgement and celebration. The family and friends of this week’s graduates had helped them get to this point and deserved to be walking across the stage too.

    Through DJ’s study journey, his kids saw him at the kitchen table writing notes and talking aimlessly at the computer.

    “But I’m sure now sitting in the crowd they understand what it was all for and I hope that through seeing my journey it will inspire them to follow my footsteps in chasing qualifications, ideally first before chasing a ball around for a career.”

    He said knowledge is power and qualifications shouldn’t just sit on the wall collecting dust.

    “Let today be a celebration of success and tomorrow be the start of the real journey as we all try and apply our learnings and make a difference in the real world.”

    To find out more about Capable NZ, visit their website: www.capable.nz

  • Graduate address: Anastasia Timoshkina (May 3 2019)

    Student ambassador and new graduate Anastasia Timoshkina spoke about the value of compassion, during her speech at this week’s graduation ceremony.

    Anastasia arrived on campus last June to study the Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Management. She immediately made a huge impact on students and staff alike. Passionate about volunteering, she helped out at nearly every student event at Otago Polytechnic Auckland International Campus.

    Anastasia began her speech by thanking her lecturers for the knowledge they had shared and the Corporate Relations, Employability, and Student Success Teams for helping students to succeed.

    She said her mother and grandmother raised her and her mother gave her everything she needed: a good upbringing, an education and a role model.

    She shares her mum’s compassion and always tried to find volunteering opportunities back in Russia such as helping animals, the homeless, and the older generation.

    During her graduation address, Anastasia shared the story of the time she and her mother came across a homeless woman who had become separated from her family. Anastasia used social media to track down the woman’s son and reunited the two of them. The experience taught her compassion, patience and love.

    Anastasia says she’s always tried to be hardworking, understanding and a good listener. She’s enthusiastic about social activities which was why she jumped at the opportunity to be a student ambassador.

    She said she hoped all of this week’s graduates would go on to lead a good life.

    “You are now here because you succeeded, and the important part is to look ahead and to lead a respectable life.”

    Anastasia outlined some of the things she had learned during her time studying in New Zealand, including the importance of setting realistic goals, embracing diversity, and taking any opportunity to integrate into the local culture.

  • One News covers Brewing programme (May 3 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic’s ground-breaking Brewing programme was the focus of a One News piece this week.

    The One News crew spoke to Brewing Operations Manager Ben Middlemiss and Lecturer Geoff Collie as well as learners enrolled in the New Zealand Certificate in Brewing (Level 4) programme, which utilises Rough Rock Brewing Co, our brand-new commercial brewery-come-classroom at Bannockburn.

    The full-time one-year programme, which welcomed its first intake of students in February this year, has been designed for those with a passion for brewing who want to get into the industry, or are seeking to enhance their knowledge and skills.

    Watch the One News item

    Read more about our Brewing programme

     

  • Call for Papers: Sustainable Practice (May 2 2019)

    We are calling for papers for the open access peer-reviewed journal Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Learning and Teaching) 8 - Sustainable Practice.

    The series Scope (Sustainable Practice) aims to engage discussion on contemporary research in the field of sustainable practice (including resilience, sustainability science etc). It is concerned with views and critical debates surrounding issues of practice, theory, history and their relationships as manifested through the experiences of researchers and practitioners in sustainable practice. The focus of this issue will be Integration of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Contributors will be encouraged to explore interactions of practice, theory and education with the SDGs.

    Submission formats

    There are several formats that you can submit for consideration:

    Feature Article- 2500-4000 word article.

    Perspectives-  Opinion piece or a more personal essay. 

    Reportage- Reportage on a successful solution being implemented at a specific location.

    Sustainable Practice in History- Looking back to look forwards

    Envision- A vision for a sustainable future

    Review- Reviews of books, movies, websites, videos, and other media or performance that present solutions.

    Read the full Author Guidelines here.

    For more information of to chat through an idea for a submission contact Ray O'Brien.

    Call for papers closes 28th June 2019.

  • Celebrating graduate success (May 2 2019)

    Students from all over the globe graduated at our ceremony in Auckland yesterday.

    A total of 225 graduates crossed the stage including those who completed their study through Otago Polytechnic Auckland International Campus, Capable NZ, and Future Skills Academy.

    Our graduates came from more than 17 countries including Brazil, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Indonesia, Russia, Malaysia, and Belarus.

    Campbell Macgregor was the guest speaker at yesterday’s event. Campbell has spent the last 29 years in education. He is an accredited exercise physiologist and certified clinical densitometrist with specialisation in older athletes.

    He said the graduates had been given the building blocks of education. He encouraged them to use these to create a pathway to keep moving forward.

     “The only way that you will do that is by living the values that you have.”

    Rugby star DJ Forbes was among yesterday’s Capable NZ graduates. Forbes played for the All Blacks Sevens team for over a decade and captained the side to gold at the Commonwealth Games.

    He graduated with his Master of Professional Practice and also spoke on behalf of Capable NZ graduates at the ceremony.

    Forbes said graduating was easily one of his biggest achievements.

    “I could compare it to winning a gold medal or a big game.”

    Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Management graduate Anastasia Timoshkina spoke on behalf of OPAIC graduates.

    She thanked her lecturers for the knowledge they had shared and the Corporate Relations, Employability, and Student Success Teams for helping students to succeed.

    Anastasia outlined some of the things she had learned during her time studying in New Zealand, including the importance of setting realistic goals, embracing diversity, and taking any opportunity to integrate into the local culture.

    Check out our Graduation photos on Facebook or watch the video here.

  • Otago Polytechnic continues to grow research base (May 2 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic continues to grow its research base, the latest round of Performance Based Research Funding reflecting the ITP’s commitment to a well-rounded research culture that benefits teaching, learners, and the wider community.

    Otago Polytechnic Performance Based Research Funding (PBRF) exceeds expectations following the latest evaluation in the 2018 funding round.

    Funded research includes the areas of Business, Creative Arts and Design, Education, Engineering Technology and Architecture, Health and Sports, Humanities (such as Art History and Theory), Information Technology, Māori Knowledge, and Social Sciences.

    Otago Polytechnic was one of the first ITPs (Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics) to enter the PBRF (Performance Based Research Funding) quality evaluation in 2006.

    Over the three quality evaluation rounds (2006, 2012, 2018) in which Otago Polytechnic participated, there has been a 62% increase in the number of staff awarded funded categories.

    According to the Education Commission, the participation in PBRF from ITPs is increasing, as is the number of awarded funded categories for research.

    TEC rightly notes that thedistribution of B and C Quality Categories suggests a focus on supporting a research culture and the [ITP] subsector’s contribution to regional and local communities.”

    This is also the case for Otago Polytechnic, which has experienced solid growth, especially in the number of C researchers (an increase of 72% since 2012). Category C funding is based on the work of an active researcher who shows peer recognition for their research and includes a contribution to the research environment within their institution or the wider community during the assessment period.

    “It is these researchers who are most likely to be working with communities and in areas of applied research,” says Professor Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic.

    “Otago Polytechnic congratulates all its researchers, whose strong work has contributed to our success,” Prof Schmidt says.

    “The level of funding will continue to stimulate our research, which is well-rounded, underpinning our teaching, and connected to Otago Polytechnic’s ongoing interaction with a broad range of communities.”

    Read more about our research

  • DJ Forbes among range of sports stars set to graduate from Otago Polytechnic (May 1 2019)

    DJ Forbes is no stranger to either challenges or success. Yet the New Zealand Rugby Sevens star rates graduating with a Masters from Otago Polytechnic this week as one of his greatest accomplishments – and one of his toughest assignments.

    Forbes will receive a Master of Professional Practice at Otago Polytechnic’s Auckland International Campus graduation ceremony on Wednesday, 1 May.

    He will be among a host of New Zealand sporting talent to graduate this week.

    Others include former All Black Jerome Kaino, who will graduate (in absentia) with a Bachelor of Applied Management through Capable New Zealand. Several players from the Blues Super Rugby franchise will also graduate with the same degree.

    A school within Otago Polytechnic, Capable NZ has empowered no shortage of sports stars in recent years.

    These include Olympic athletics coach Raylene Bates, Black Caps cricketer Grant Elliott, Tongan rugby international Hale T-Pole, Samoan rugby international Seilala Mapusua, Silver Ferns netballers Jodi Brown and Katrina Grant, windsurfing legend Barbara Kendall, New Zealand cricketers Katie Glynn, Luke Ronchi and Hamish Rutherford, and All White Andrew Durante. 

    Forbes says his Masters project was one of his toughest tests.

    “But it is probably one of my most fulfilling achievements.

    “The urge to continue with study after completing a Bachelor of Applied Management through Capable New Zealand was an easy decision, but I quickly found out how hard it was going to be. My lead facilitator, Glenys Ker, was instrumental in keeping me on track and giving me the push I needed to finish it off.

    “There were many sleepless nights,” Forbes reflects.

    The former national men’s Sevens captain, who led New Zealand to World Cup and Commonwealth Games gold medals, has joined the New Zealand Olympic Committee in a newly created role dedicated to athlete engagement and well-being.

    Forbes will sit on the Tokyo 2020 Leadership Team (planning) led by Chef de Mission Rob Waddell and will also support the development of team culture and athlete engagement for the 2019 Samoa Pacific Games, San Diego Beach Games and the 2020 Lausanne Olympic Winter Youth Games. Forbes’ new role also sees him support the New Zealand Olympic Committee’s Athlete and Olympians Commission.

    “Ultimately, having this Masters qualification not only credits my new learnings but it also acknowledges what I had already brought to my field of enquiry.

    “I believe this gives me more credibility but, more importantly, adds a theoretical and research-based framework to what people might assume has been a life of practical learning for me.

    “I’m truly thankful to Otago Polytechnic for the opportunity and grateful that the Capable NZ programme supports and acknowledges prior learning from extensive experiences. It is also flexible in regards time management, which has enabled me to complete what would’ve been almost impossible in any other situation.”

    Glenys Ker, Programme Leader of Capable NZ’s undergraduate programmes, says Forbes’ experience of progressing beyond undergraduate level has become a lot more common over the last few years.

    “It is inspiring to observe – we witness our learners transform in terms of their personal and professional selves.

    “The Master of Professional Practice programme encourages the learner to identify a significant project in their workplace – one which will be challenging and stimulate new learning for them.

    “Learners are guided through a review of their learning to date. They then write up a ‘learning agreement’ about what they are going to do, and why; then they set about undertaking the project of enquiry.”

    Glenys has also been working closely with the Blues group, who began their studies in June 2018 and utilised Otago Polytechnic’s Queen St campus on occasion to complete their degrees.

    “Other players have now signed up and are working towards gaining a qualification, which is exciting for all sporting codes.”

    Read more about Capable NZ

  • Save the Date: Elizabeth Kozlowski at DPAG Sat 25 May (April 30 2019)

    SAT 25 MAY, 3PM, DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY

    Textile and privilege: Decolonizing institutional spaces and practices

    Independent curator and editor of Surface Design Journal (US), Elizabeth Kozlowski will share her professional practice as it relates to curatorial activism (a term coined by Maura Reilly) and the decolonization of museum spaces. Kozlowski will also provide an overview of her most recent exhibition, Material Domestication which utilises the framework of traditional fiber-based techniques as sculptural explorations invested in the dismantling of historical markers of gender.

     

    Elizabeth Kozlowski is currently Editor, Surface Design Journal (US) and an independent curator, arts consultant and collections
    manager based in America.

     

    Presented at Dunedin Public Art Gallery (DPAG) In association with The Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ) and The College of Art, Design and Architecture (ADA), Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Mataini ki Otago, Dunedin. Elizabeth Kozlowski is touring Aotearoa New Zealand thanks to the generous support of Creative New Zealand.

     

     

    (image credit: Carolyn Townsley, Dialogue (detail), 2008, Woven printed paper and cotton, Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic Collection)

  • Graduation livestream available (April 29 2019)

    We will livestream our graduation on Wednesday 1 May, allowing families back home to watch their loved ones cross the stage.

    The stream will be available at https://youtu.be/MYLEd8IwzGA from 12.30pm on Wednesday.

     

  • Public Seminar: Rachel Dibble: Lines from within (April 29 2019)

    THUR 2 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Rachel Dibble:  Lines from within

    This 20/20 slideshow is a selection of accumulated experiences in a journey, both symbolically and literally.  The autoethnographic journey records the space and time spent traveling to Taranaki Maunga, to Hawera to return whenua ki te whenua and to be close to the t¯urangawaewae for the first time with tamariki who have been born away from their marae. 

    Influenced by the location of the indigenous narrative of Paul Whitinui, spoken word poems and visual (re)defining of words on a page, the journey of the author is literal and metaphorical, discussing the map of the journey, and navigating through a process of whakamaa, while teaching Tiriti o Waitangi as mataawaka.  The author is reflecting on the journey and recording the connections made by the author to enrich the connection of her tamariki through whenua ki te whenua. 

    #turangawaewae #manatamariki #Whenua ki te whenua #roadtripwiththekids #linesonherskin

     

    Ko Rachel Dibble (Ng¯ati Ruanui, Ng¯a Ruahine) t¯oku ingoa.  I am a m¯am¯a to two tamariki.  My mahi at Otago Polytechnic is in Social Services and an annual 'pop up' in Midwifery, focussing on Tiriti o Waitangi application in these areas.  The historical links between Taranaki and ¯Otepoti have connected me with the landscape that weaves into my teaching and my learning

  • Public Seminars - Term 2 Programme 2019 (April 18 2019)

    THURSDAY SEMINAR PROGRAMME 2 MAY - 13 JUNE, 2019, P152 DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART
    (image: Jasmine Togo-Brisby: Tautai Artist in Residence) - see 13 June Seminar)

     

    THUR 2 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Rachel Dibble:  Lines from within

    This 20/20 slideshow is a selection of accumulated experiences in a journey, both symbolically and literally.  The autoethnographic journey records the space and time spent traveling to Taranaki Maunga, to Hawera to return whenua ki te whenua and to be close to the tūrangawaewae for the first time with tamariki who have been born away from their marae. 

    Influenced by the location of the indigenous narrative of Paul Whitinui, spoken word poems and visual (re)defining of words on a page, the journey of the author is literal and metaphorical, discussing the map of the journey, and navigating through a process of whakamaa, while teaching Tiriti o Waitangi as mataawaka.  The author is reflecting on the journey and recording the connections made by the author to enrich the connection of her tamariki through whenua ki te whenua. 

    #turangawaewae #manatamariki #Whenua ki te whenua #roadtripwiththekids #linesonherskin

     

    Ko Rachel Dibble (Ngāti Ruanui, Ngā Ruahine) tōku ingoa.  I am a māmā to two tamariki.  My mahi at Otago Polytechnic is in Social Services and an annual 'pop up' in Midwifery, focussing on Tiriti o Waitangi application in these areas.  The historical links between Taranaki and Ōtepoti have connected me with the landscape that weaves into my teaching and my learning.

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

     

    THUR 9 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Lucy Hammond. Space makers: Contemporary approaches to curating collections

    This seminar will offer a short overview of the DPAG collection and its history and development, and then discuss curatorial approaches to exhibition making and working with this collection. Lucy will use a series of different exhibitions as case studies, including Space Suit (2018), Gordon Walters: New Vision (2017-18) and Marie Shannon: Rooms found only in the home, discuss more generally the approach to staging exhibitions at DPAG and the role of collaboration in curatorial practice.

     

    Lucy Hammond is a curator and writer based in Ōtepoti/Dunedin. She is the Curator at Dunedin Public Art Gallery, with research interests extending across contemporary and historic art, craft and design. Recent curatorial projects include New Networks: Contemporary Chinese Art (2018-19), Gordon Walters: New Vision (2017-18), and Marie Shannon: Rooms found only in the home (2017). She is widely published,, and a contributing writer to the 2017 publication Gordon Walters: New Vision, which was shortlisted in the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards and winner of the AAANZ 2018 Best Large exhibition catalogue. She is a judge for the illustrated non-fiction category in the 2019 Ockham New Zealand Book awards, and is presently working across a range of contemporary and historic projects in her role at DPAG.

     

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 16 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Andrew McStay: How To Live Well with Emotional AI: Creativity

    Emotions are inextricable from human experience and sit at the heart of artistic production. This seminar discusses and invites conversation on emotional AI, or technologies that use affective computing and artificial intelligence techniques to sense, learn about and interact with human emotional life. Drawing on ongoing research and collaborative work with electronic artist Ronan Devlin, McStay will outline what emotional AI technologies are, how we may theorise these, and ways in which they may be used by artists and creative practitioners. The second part of the seminar will collaboratively address what it means to sense and interact with emotion, opportunities for artists, ethical concerns about use of such data, and what creativity means in context of automated production and AI.

    Andrew McStay is Professor of Digital Life at Bangor University (UK) and the 2019 William Evans Fellow. This is the second session in the ‘How To Live Well in Emotional AI’ series presented on the Otago campus and organised by The Brandbach, the creative industries specialisation of the University of Otago.

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 23 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Alex Monteith: The ocean now?

    Alex Monteith will present on a range of collaborative works that both she has made, and that the collective Local Time (Danny Butt, Jon Bywater, Alex Monteith & Natalie Robertson) has produced around the coast or about fresh water. The seminar will consider recent art projects that address contemporary coastal living in Moana Nui and Aotearoa in light of emergent eco-tourism economies and recent legal claims on ocean and water. It will also touch on aspects of indigenous/tauiwi partnerships and/or collectivity that have evolved within the works.

     

    Alex Monteith’s works explore the political dimensions of culture in turmoil over land ownership, history and occupation. She is working on a series of artworks focused on bodies of water that evince tensions both historical and natural. These have included an ongoing series on the Rena Disaster (2011-current) in Aotearoa, and a series of work focused on Te Mimi o Tū Te Rakiwhānoa (Fiordland Coastal Marine Area) in relation to recent archaeological history in Aotearoa. Other works traverse political movements, contemporary sports, culture and social activities and projects often taking place in large-scale or extreme geographies. She is also a member of the collective Local Time (Alex Monteith, Danny Butt, Jon Bywater, Natalie Robertson). Local Time has been named as a collective since 2007, usually working in collaboration with maintainers of local knowledge in specific sites, and engaging in debates concerning colonial histories and cross-cultural exchange through art projects, contemporary art teaching and critical writing. Alex is a some-time political and environmental activist.

     

    Exhibitions have included a survey exhibition at the Govett Brewster Art Gallery 2012, and a solo exhibition at MMK Frankfurt, Germany, 2012. Alex was a recipient of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand New Generation Award (2008), and a Walters Prize finalist (2010). She is currently a senior lecturer at the Elam School of Fine Arts, the University of Auckland, Aotearoa, having held prior lecturing positions at AUT (2006) and MIT (2007‐08).

     

     

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 30 MAY, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Queering the Institutional Space

    In this panel discussion, activist Hahna Briggs, artist Sorawit Songsataya and art writer / curator Robyn Maree Pickens will discuss Emma Chalmers' exhibition Intersecting Architectures, on at the Dunedin School of Art from May 20th - May 31st 2019. Emma's exhibition and the attendant publication will consider queer history and culture in Dunedin; the opening up of institutional spaces to the LGBTQI+ community; the connection between sexuality and intersectionality and the potentialities of a utopian queer future (inspired in particular by José Esteban Muñoz’s essay ‘Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity’). 

     

    Hahna Briggs has a Masters in Dance Studies and was the 2013 Caroline Plummer Community Dance Fellow. She currently runs inclusive dance classes and performances for people with and without disability through Gasp! Dance Collective. Hahna has worked for OUSA Student Support for 4 and a half years, first as the Queer Support Co-ordinator and now as the Senior Student Advocate. In addition, Hahna is a member of the Dunedin Pride Inc Management committee.

     

    Robyn Maree Pickens is an art writer, curator and text-based practitioner. Her critical and creative work is centred on the relationship between aesthetic practices and ecological reparation. Robyn's art writing has appeared in Art Asia Pacific online, ANZJA, Art + Australia online, The Pantograph Punch and Art New Zealand. Her most recent curatorial project was presented at Blue Oyster ("Bright Cave" 2018) and her most recent text-based work was exhibited at Te Tuhi (December 2018 - March 2019). Currently Robyn is a PhD candidate in ecological aesthetics at the University of Otago and an art reviewer for the Otago Daily Times and Art News. 

     

    Sorawit Songsataya was born in Chiang Mai, Thailand and lives and works in Ōtepoti Dunedin. Primarily interested in craft, textiles, digital modality, handmade and machine-made objects, Sorawit’s practice forms at the intersection of digitised labour and traditional craftsmanship, exploring the intricacy of what it means to “make” today. In 2018 he was awarded the Iaspis Studio Residency, Stockholm, Sweden and the McCahon House artist residency, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. In February 2019, Sorawit stayed at the historic Rita Angus cottage as part of Enjoy Public Art Gallery Summer Residency programme. Sorawit has a Master of Fine Art from Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland (2013). Previous exhibitions include Art and Shops, Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Bright Cave, Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Ōtepoti Dunedin (2018); Soon Enough: Art in Action, Tensta Konstall, Stockholm (2018); Starling, Artspace, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland (2018); Acting Out, Adam Art Gallery Te Pātaka Toi, Te Whaganui-a-Tara Wellington (2017); Potentially Yours: The Coming Community, Artspace, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland (2016); The Non-living Agent, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland (2016).

     

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 6 JUNE, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Natalie Smith: From Formality to Fluidity: Fraser Crowe, “Art as Fashion, Fashion as Art” 20 Years On 

     

    In 1998 an article on the fashion label Fraser Crowe appeared in Art New Zealand, the title of the article, “Art as Fashion, Fashion as Art: Deborah Crowe and Kim Fraser” spoke to the interchangeability, or fluidity, of the borders and boundaries between the two worlds.

    Author, Mark Kirby, noted that  Crowe and Fraser’s collaborative designs were considered unusual because they were conceptually based and did not fit “any of the customary fixed fashion categories.”  The designs reflected the duo’s backgrounds, Fraser has a background in fashion design, while Crowe has a background in fibre and sculpture.  In 1997 Fraser Crowe won the  Supreme Award at the Benson & Hedges Smokefree Fashion Design Awards (BHSFDA) for Dual Outlook a garment made from a copper sheath with a woven visor, the design prophetically conceptualised the future – a future where we would need to cocoon ourselves from the onslaught of digital communication.    Using Fraser Crowe as a case study this paper explores how, 20 years on, the relationship between art and fashion is now more fluid than ever. 

     

    Natalie Smith is a teaching fellow in Sociology, Gender Studies and Criminology and a Lecture in Art History and Visual Culture at the University of Otago.  Her primary areas of research interest are New Zealand fashion design and the social and cultural factors that influence design.  She is particularly interested in the relationship between gender, work and design; craft; textile design; and the art/fashion nexus.  Natalie has a longstanding interest in arts governance and has served on the boards of several not-for-profit arts organizations in Aotearoa New Zealand.

     

    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 13 JUNE, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby: Tautai Artist in Residence

    Jasmine Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander, whose great-great-grandparents were taken from Vanuatu as children and put to work on an Australian sugarcane plantation. Togo-Brisby's research examines the historical practice of 'blackbirding', a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and its contemporary legacy and impact upon those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora. Based in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is one of the few artists delving into the cultural memory and shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific, her practice encompassing painting, early photographic techniques and processes, and sculpture.

     

  • Art graduate celebrates exhibition at Pah Homestead (April 18 2019)

    Dunedin School of Art graduate Hannah Leigh Rennie Cockfield this week celebrated the opening of her exhibition, Club Tumeke, at the prestigious Pah Homestead in Auckland.

    This exhibition is supported by the Wallace Arts Trust and Jan Warburton Charitable Trust and is in association with Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art.

    Hannah was the first recipient of the Wallace Warburton Graduate Exhibition Scholarship 2017.

    Offered by Wallace and Warburton Trusts, the scholarship includes a solo exhibition at the Pah Homestead in Auckland, contributions towards materials, production costs, freight and travel, an exhibition opening and publicity, as well as the exhibition space for 6-8 weeks.

    The scholarship was created to promote graduates who are embarking on a career as a professional artist and, consequentially, need an introduction to New Zealand’s largest and most influential art market in Auckland. An exhibition at the Pah Homestead brings with it an opportunity to meet dealer gallery professionals and potentially being represented by a commercial gallery.

    Born in Christchurch, raised on the West Coast, and currently living in Dunedin, Hannah graduated from the Dunedin School of Art in 2017.

    Hannah’s cultural identity exists between two worlds of Māoritanga and Westernization, of tradition and modernity, and of custom and innovation. Her landscapes tell a story of whānau and the connectedness being a part of a community brings: realising potential relationships through shared experiences and working together which provides people with a sense of belonging.

    “More than the definitive recital of ancestry, whakapapa centres people within a wider context and a shared opportunity to create links with common ancestors, spaces, places, and people,” Hannah explains.

    “The imagined spaces in Club Tumeke celebrate collective community, envisioning an amalgamation of Māori and Pakeha knowledge and experience reflected on to the land, which is culturally both and neither: Aotearoa New Zealand. In fragments of colours against vibrant dimensions of layered spaces and intertwined with the buzzing rhythm of surrounding line and pattern, the landscape emerges.

    “Just as seawater fills and binds grains of sand, these paintings are informed not solely by the depicted objects; but by balance, the ‘flow’ of the figure and space, and of each painting as part of a greater whole.”

    Hannah Leigh Rennie Cockfield’s exhibition, Club Tumeke, is showing at Pah Homestead in Auckland until 19 May.

    Captions for photos: Ikamatua – eeykamahtooah, 300 x 300mm acrylic on linen, 2018-19 (at left); and Tamakimakauraunui, 1200 x 1500mm acrylic on linen, 2018-19.

    Read more about our Art programmes

  • Kids on Campus for school holidays (April 18 2019)
    OPAIC welcomed the children of its staff onto campus again these school holidays.
    We had 37 kids aged five to 17 attending yesterday’s Kids on Campus event.
    The day started with some board games, pool, and table tennis. The kids were then divided into groups for activities and competitions.
    After morning tea, they took part in a campus wide Amazing Race. That was followed by lunch and a round of mini-golf.
    The kids finished off their day with an interactive circus show and workshop.
    Check out the photos here.
  • Dunedin School of Art graduate selected for KulturKontakt residency (April 16 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Dunedin School of Art graduate Arati Kushwaha has been accepted as the 2019 Artist in Residence with KulturKontakt Austria.

    Arati beat 800 international applicants for the prestigious three-month placement, which begins in October.

    Offered by the Austrian Federal Chancellery in cooperation with KulturKontakt Austria, the residency includes a studio and enables the recipient to become familiar with the Austrian art scene and make contact with Austrian artists.

    Arati, who graduated with a Masters from the Dunedin School of Art in 2018, will aim to complete a work during her residency.

    Born in Maharashtra, India, Arati completed a Postgraduate Certificate in Visual Art at the Dunedin School of Art in 2015, then returned to do a Master of Visual Art, majoring in sculpture.

    “Michele Beevors was my studio supervisor and Alex Kennedy my writing supervisor. Both have offered me much inspiration,” Arati says.

    “Gender, identity, sexuality, femininity, self-induced abortion and destruction have been persistent themes throughout my life.

    “Contemplating this idea, I execute my work through found objects, soft construction, installations, semantic waxwork and video work.

    “My Master’s project, Slow Decay (2017-2018), aims to contribute and challenge traditional cultural views (relating to ideas, social behaviour, politics) of the ‘girl-child’ in an Indian social context, as well as provoke feminist discussions.

    “I attempt to articulate the conservative treatment and attitude towards the ‘girl-child’ in society, in the form of gender inequity and the struggle for girls to find acceptance and a place in a hierarchical society often structured not by affection, but by social norms, parental ignorance and traditional values.

    “Collectively, in all human societies, women’s sexuality has often been portrayed as something scary, weird, threatening and terrifyingly abject, more monster than human.”

    Arati can’t wait to embark on the KulturKonTakt Residency.

    “To me, the residency is far more than building international connections networks – although that is important, too.

    “Residencies work best when they involve active collaboration, and the artist feels that something has happened or changed. It provides a chance for new knowledge and learnings. People and places have a certain impact, too, and are likely to inspire me creatively, as well as sustain me professionally.  

    “The residency also provides recognition. But, more importantly, it will give me the time and space to allow me to develop my artistic practice.

    “On finishing the residency, I will continue to explore gender equity and education through my art.”

    Read more about our art programmes

     

     

     

     

     

  • Spreading the word about sustainability (April 16 2019)
    Our Implementing Sustainable Practice students were out in Aotea Square today, sharing their messages about environmental issues.
    Students in the class got into small teams to research a particular issue and create a poster presentation about it.
    They then took their posters to Aotea Square to encourage sustainability discussions among members of the public.
    Check out the photos here
  • Dunedin School of Art OPEN DAY (April 11 2019)

    SUNDAY 5 MAY, 10 AM - 3 PM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, REIGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    The Dunedin School of Art is offering FREE workshop experiences in its world-class facilities. If you’d like to try out a specific technique or are interested in what they get up to, please come along. The workshops are suitable for anyone - no prior experience required.

    Thinking of applying to study at the Dunedin School of Art in 2020? Staff will be available to discuss application entry requirements for our art programmes, assist with your portfolio preparation and your application. We are now offering provisional placements in our programmes for 2020 if your work clearly meets our entry criteria. Bring along examples of your artwork and discuss this option.

    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED - Turn up on the day and have a go!

    For more information: artadmin@op.ac.nz | 0800 762 786 | www.op.ac.nz/art

    OPEN DAY PROGRAMME

    > 10.30am – 11.00am. Bridie Lonie will give a talk in the lecture room (P152 ground floor)
    > Tours of the Dunedin School of Art will take place throughout the day, please make yourself known to a staff member if you would like a tour.


    Studio Workshop Activities
    Ceramics. “Have a go on the wheel” with Rob Cloughley. Tours of the Ceramic Studio, demos & some basic tuition on making with clay. Here is an opportunity to have a go making work on the pottery wheel. At 12 noon we will demonstrate the Raku firing process. Raku is a Japanese process that involves opening the kiln up while red hot to take the work out.

    Drawing. “Observational Drawing” with Michele Beevors and Kiri Mitchell. Have a go at drawing still life with charcoal and an eraser. Also try the concept of creating a blind contour drawing.

    Photographic Media Arts. “Lighting Studio” with Frank Pawluk. Explore a studio lighting setup for video and photography stills. Utilise the cameras to shoot low key portraits or video a self-promo.

    Jewellery and Metalsmithing. “3D Printed Jewellery” with Brendon Monson and Andrew Last. Customise a ring or pendant using simple CAD software, 3D print the Jewellery and cast it in pewter using the Delft Clay technique.

    Painting. “Painting in Miniature” with Anita De Soto, Graham Fletcher and Michael Greaves. You may discover skills that you never knew you had. Learn an easy way to achieve instant results.

    Photography. “Partake in a photography experience under the red light” with Rachel Allan. Create a photographic drawing in the darkroom.

    Printmaking. “Etching Workshop” with Neil Emmerson and Marion Wassenaar. Introduction to the intaglio process of dry point etching on clear plastic. This involves inking and printing works on paper through the etching press.

    Textiles. “Textile Screen Printing” with Victoria Bell. Come and explore screen printing with pre-made photo-stencil screens and paper stencils, in our Textiles Workshop. Fabric supplied. Come play with colour and cloth, using provided designs or free-hand paper cutouts.

    Postgraduate Study Information Session.
    Lecture Room: P152 11.00am - 12.00noon with Ed Hanfling

    Postgraduate study provides the opportunity to develop as an art practitioner as you develop a deeper understanding through practical- and theory-based research. Choose to study at the Dunedin School of Art and enter into a lively and challenging environment where you will benefit from the nationally unique workshop facilities, a focus on individual supervision and the expertise of lecturers who have a diverse range of approaches and understandings in the Visual Arts.

    (Image: Kylie Mathieson, Ceramics)

  • Success Story: Gayathri Guruge (April 9 2019)

    Graduate Gayathri Guruge says she built connections inside and outside the classroom during her time at OPAIC.

    Gayathri comes from a finance background. She completed a bachelor’s degree in accounting and finance at the University of London and has about three years’ experience working in the field.

    She decided she wanted to pursue higher studies, then selected OPAIC for her postgraduate qualification after looking into a number of countries.

    Her programme at OPAIC wasn’t just about theory, but about how to apply the theory. All of the evaluations and assignments focused on application.

    “I did enjoy it. It was more than I expected,” says Gayathri.

    She had a lot of choice in terms of subjects. The subjects she selected included Corporate Governance and Leadership, Financial Decision Making, Capabilities for Managers, Marketing in a Digital Age, and Managing for Sustainability.

    All of those subjects were relevant for her future career: “I think it was a very good course.”

    She also completed an internship at MediaWorks during her time at OPAIC. That was a “golden opportunity”, which introduced her to the New Zealand finance industry and opened the door for job opportunities.

    Gayathri finished her course last December and already has a job as a junior accountant at Berit Holdings.

    Gayathri says she feels very lucky to live in New Zealand.

    ‘I’m so thankful to myself for selecting this country in the first place because I like New Zealand a lot – the warmth of the people, the cultural diversity.”

    One of the best parts about being in New Zealand is building connections, according to Gayathri.

    At OPAIC she built connections beyond the classroom which would positively impact her career, she says.

  • Public Exhibition: TOP ART - NCEA Level 3 portfolios (April 9 2019)

    April 29 - May 2, 2019, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Top Art is an annual touring exhibition featuring a selection of the NCEA Level 3 portfolios that achieved Excellence in Visual Art in the previous year. Five streams are covered: design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

     

    (Image credit: Callum Steele-MacIntosh, King’s High School)


    EXHIBITION VENUE: Dunedin School of Art Gallery, Ground Floor, P Block
    Riego Street (off Albany St)

    EXHIBITION DATES: April 29 - May 2, 2019
    EXHIBITION HOURS:
    Monday: 11am-4pm
    Tuesday + Thursday: 10am -4pm
    Wednesday: 10am - 6.30pm

    Please contact: artadmin@op.ac.nz to book a workshop, arrange a tour of the Art School or talk to staff about portfolio preparation.

    The Dunedin School of Art invites secondary school students to our Open Day workshops and tours on Sunday May 6, 2019
    10am - 3pm.
    Bookings not required.

     

     


    www.op.ac.nz/art

  • Public Seminar: Susan Best (April 9 2019)

    THUR 11 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Susan Best
    Intimacy with Strangers: Nat Randall and Anna Breckon's The Second Woman
    This paper examines one contemporary participatory performance that centres on a romantic couple: a twenty-four hour performance work by Anna Breckon and Nat Randall called The Second Woman (2016). This work uses the serial method established by conceptual art as an impersonal mode to present 100 intimate encounters between Nat Randall and the various men who answered a call out to participate. The work repeats a scene between a woman and her lover where disconnection and repair figure. The men are at once highly individual and yet also interchangeable, disposable and substitutable (like a contemporary Tinder dating app, the men slide past quickly into a blur). Randall has an astonishing capacity to accommodate each man and his approach to the narrative and the performance, I analyse her approach to seriality using the idea of "the law of the mother" developed by British psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell.

    Susan Best is an art historian and occasional curator, specialising in modern and contemporary art. Her books include Visualizing Feeling: Affect and the Feminine Avant-garde (2011) and Reparative Aesthetics: Witnessing in Contemporary Art Photography (2016). Both books won the Australia and New Zealand Art Association best book prize. She is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

  • Otago Polytechnic submits alternative model for VE sector  (April 8 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic has submitted its alternative model for restructuring the Vocational Education sector – one that it believes will result in a high-performing and high-quality Vocational Education system, of which New Zealanders can be justifiably proud.

    The Otago Polytechnic model introduces much-needed centralisation of key functions yet retains the best qualities of the currently high-performing polytechnics.

    Most importantly, Otago Polytechnic’s proposed new system designs in flexibility, responsiveness and innovation – all essential ingredients of a world-class Vocational Education system.

    Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive Phil Ker says, “We appreciate Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ willingness to listen to our concerns and are optimistic that our refinements of his original model will be taken on board.”

    The proposals for the reform of the vocational education sector in New Zealand have much to be commended and we support:

    • The consolidation of all public sector vocational delivery to Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics
    • The establishment of Industry Skills Bodies (ISB)
    • The focus on better serving learners who are in work
    • The commitment to a funding system which addresses the complexity of delivery in New Zealand and the inadequacy of current levels of funding
    • An appropriate level of centralisation of the ITP sector 

    The proposal to merge 16 institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) into one institution will not serve New Zealand’s communities, employers and learners as well as it might. 

    Our refined model focuses on the establishment of a vocational education system rather than a single institution, although the system would have a head office identity. 

    There is considerable merit in having a sector which plans and behaves as a system in the interests of New Zealand as whole, at the same time strengthening individual providers through centralised support and thereby strengthened educational provision in the regions of New Zealand. 

    This refined model also provides the opportunity for the best of the high-performing current institutions to be replicated across all of the providers in the system.

    Otago Polytechnic acknowledges the depth of support it has enjoyed from a wide cross-section of the community, from learners and parents, to elected officials, businesses and stakeholders, to various global partners.

    Submissions on the Government’s reform of the Vocational Education sector close on Friday, 5 April.

    A Government decision is expected in June.

    Summary of responses and recommendations (note: this summary is based on the full submission, attached as PDF)

    Otago Polytechnic supports:

    • the consolidation of workplace training and apprenticeships to institutes of technology and polytechnics
    • the establishment of industry skills bodies to set standards for vocational training
    • the commitment to a new “fit for purpose” funding system
    • the establishment of a vocational education system with an appropriate level of centralisation and appropriate autonomy for regional providers
    • preservation of the academic freedom of staff and institutions as currently provided in the Education Act 1989, contextualised to the new model
    • the establishment of a shared services entity for curriculum development for the system
    • the establishment of centres of vocational excellence as component parts of the new system

    Otago Polytechnic does not support:

    • the reform proposal as is to merge the current 16 ITPs into a single institution
    • the narrow definition of vocational education which excludes degree and postgraduate teaching and learning
    • the proposal that ISBs set assessment, undertake moderation, approve programme design
    • the proposal that Open Polytechnic be New Zealand’s sole provider of on-line learning

    Otago Polytechnic recommends:

    • the establishment of a vocational education system for New Zealand based on a refinement of the structural proposal as follows:
      • a system head office to be responsible for planning, coordinating and oversight of the system as a whole, with powers to intervene in the event of failure of either individual providers or of provision
      • a number of regional centres responsible for meeting the training and education needs of learners and employers in their region, or nationally if mandated to do so
      • legislative functions and decision making rights of the system head office and the regional providers
      • legal status for regional centres as semi-autonomous institutions with regional governance
      • the functions of the head office and the regional centres to be as set out in this submission
    • development of a funding system which recognises the different and complex cost drivers in our regions and which includes: 
      • a base grant for infrastructure at campus and sub campus level
      • a population dispersal grant to recognise regions with low population densities
      • a social index grant to recognise the socio-economic makeup of regions
      • additional funding to support students with mental health issues
      • additional funding to support Māori and Pasifika achievement
    • establishment of a shared service centre for learner support to augment on-campus support services
    • establishment of training and development institutes for leadership and academic staff development
    • that no decision be made by Government to mandate a single provider for on-line learning, but to require the new system head office to evaluate all of the on-line service providers to ensure an informed decision on on-line provision
    • that a clear and unequivocal statement be made that degree and postgraduate level teaching will continue as part of the vocational education sector mandate
    • that applied research be an integral part of the vocational education sector with responsibilities for both the central agency and the regional centres
    • that there be a phased transition to the new system: three years for the transfer of industry training/apprenticeships to ITPs and a minimum of two years in which current ITP providers continue business as usual
    • that there be an increase in funding rates for 2020 to address cost increases which have already occurred in the ITP sector
    • that a focused intervention occur for each of the ITPs currently in severe financial strife to address the underlying causes of their financial difficulties
    • reviews are undertaken of the future roles of both NZQA and TEC given that there will be significant quality functions and intervention powers for the new system agency
  • VE reforms provide opportunity for Open Educational Resources (April 4 2019)

    Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ proposed reforms of Vocational Education provide a great opportunity to expand an already empowering global online educational initiative – the Open Education Resource universitas.

    Conceived in 2011 at an open international meeting in Dunedin, the Open Education Resource universitas (OERu) is coordinated by the Open Education Resource Foundation (OERF), and headquartered at Otago Polytechnic.

    The OERu is an independent, not-for-profit international network of like-minded institutions that offer free access to online higher education courses for learners worldwide. It provides more affordable ways for learners to gain academic credit towards qualifications from recognised institutions.

    If users want to get academic credit, they only pay for assessment if and when they are ready.

    Otago Polytechnic believes educational materials developed using taxpayer funding should be released under an open copyright license for the benefit of all New Zealanders. This would enable the vocational education system, through initiatives such as the OERu, to offer free open online courses for independent study.

    “OERu is challenging conceptions of online delivery, including the longevity of proprietary or bespoke learning management systems, and its model promises to be a game-changer in any fit-for-future Vocational Education system,” says Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive, Phil Ker.

    “We do not support the Government’s proposal that there be only one provider of on-line learning for New Zealand.  

    “Rather, we strongly recommend that government should undertake an evaluation of options, including open education solutions, with a view to establishing a world-class integrated on-line service.

    “In the case of OERu, there is already one. The OERu network is a model of leadership and global collaboration in the important space of providing more affordable on-line learning and could be established as a Centre for Vocational Excellence (CoVE).”

    Phil says Otago Polytechnic strongly supports the establishment of Centres of Vocational Excellence under the proposed reforms.

    “However, it should be noted that the establishment of the OERF in 2009 was a result of Otago Polytechnic’s willingness to invest – and such responsive decision-making might be lost should the Government not alter its original proposal.”

    About the Open Education Resource Foundation:

    Open Education Resource Foundation Director Dr Wayne Mackintosh was awarded a United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Chair in Open Education Resources at Otago Polytechnic in 2013 in recognition of the Polytechnic’s leadership in open education.

    The post, which helps promote open and accessible education, has been renewed until October 2021. The OERF also hosts an International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) Chair in Open Educational Resources.

    “The OERu makes education accessible to everyone,” Wayne says.

    “All you need is an internet connection and you can study independently from home, with access to world-class courses from recognised institutions around the world. It’s about sharing knowledge and the sustainability of education.

    “All the course material is taught online, based on open educational resources and openly accessible materials on the internet. This means you won’t need to buy any textbooks.”  

    Designed for independent study, users get peer-support from fellow learners. The OERu network comprises institutions from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, and Oceania.

    The OERu is implementing a full first-year of study with exit qualifications in Business and Arts conferred by the University of the Highlands and Islands, United Kingdom, and Thompson Rivers University, Canada, respectively.

    Courses on offer through the OERu include, for example, “Learning in a Digital Age”, “Introduction to Entrepreneurship”, “Introduction to Project Management” and “Regional Relations in Asia and the Pacific”.

    The OERu’s innovation partnership model is building a global leadership role in transnational micro-credentialing. All OERu courses are assembled as micro-courses with options to earn micro-credentials with pathways to gain international university-level qualifications.

    Significantly, the OERu has partnered with EduBits, Otago Polytechnic’s innovative micro-credentialing initiative, to offer assessment services for these international qualifications.  

    “A micro-course allows the user flexibility to manage learning around their personal commitments and learning interests.”

    OERu micro-credentials are small enough to be manageable for busy people, but big enough to be meaningful to employers with options to transfer credit towards internationally recognised qualifications.

    Read more about OERu

  • Call for Papers: Scope - Professional Practice (April 4 2019)

    This call for contributions closes 29 June 2019. 

    Scope: Contemporary Research Topics, Flexible Learning 5 Professional Practice is a peer-reviewed publication of Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

    Scope: (Flexible Learning) 5 Professional Practice will focus on contemporary research in the post-discipline field of work-based learning and professional practice. It is concerned with views and critical debates surrounding issues of practice, theory, history and their relationships as manifested through the experiences of researchers and practitioners in work based learning and professional practice. The focus of this issue will be transformation, and contributors will be encouraged to explore the boundaries of the changes taking place both in the development of professional frameworks of practice and in this dynamic environment.

    Articles
    Articles of significant original contribution to the academic field of work based learning and professional practice. Length: 2,500 – 4,000 words of text.

    Case studies
    The journal will publish Capable NZ graduate’s case studies, co-authored by graduates and their academic mentors or facilitators, summarising the learner’s professional transformation, and the scope, scale and topic of their professional practice. Length: 1,500 – 2,500 words of text.

    Learner profiles
    The journal will also accept for publication Capable NZ’s learner profiles, short-format summaries of individual learners compiled by staff from learner’s assessment submissions. 500 – 1000 words of text.

     

    Author Guidelines

    All submissions will be accepted based on successful peer-review. Submissions should be in a Word document with place markers indicated for the location of images or tables.  Images or tables should be submitted in a separate word document.  

    Author summary/Abstract: Please provide a summary that will bring attention to the core concepts of the article. This box will appear in print, online, and may be used for press releases. Summaries should avoid acronyms and technical vocabulary and be accessible to the educated lay public (or undergraduate student). 

    Writing Style: Writing should be clear and engaging. Articles should be accessible to members of the educated public who are not experts in the field. Author should be willing to work with a Scope editor to this end.

    Referencing: All work should be adequately referenced using APA 6th Edition

    Images and Tables: All images and tables must be the copyright of the author unless accompanied by permission from the original copyright holder to reprint for publication.  Images must be at least 1 MB/1000KB or more @ 300dpi.

    Please submit your work by email to one of the co-editors – Malcolm Macpherson or Steve Henry

    Deadline for papers is 29 June 2019.

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Kaupapa Kai Tahu) (April 3 2019)

    Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Kaupapa Kāi Tahu)  5: Theme Mauri Ora | Human Flourishing to be published in 2019.

    Building on the success of our recent Māori Research Symposium: Mauri Ora, Human Flourishing (November 9, 2018), we invite your contribution to Kaupapa Kāi Tahu Scope 2019. This special issue is focused on the symposium theme of Mauri Ora | Human Flourishing, which will highlight the diverse multidisciplinary Māori research fields that contribute towards an holistic vision of human flourishing and wellbeing from across the Otago Polytechnic and wider research community.  

    We welcome your expression of interest for peer review by 30 April 2019, with a final cut-off date of 31 May 2019 to submit your full paper to Kaitohutohu@op.ac.nz 

    Any queries regarding submission guidelines can be directed to kelli.temaiharoa@op.ac.nz  

     

  • Celebration of Diversity (March 29 2019)

    We held a Celebration of Diversity on campus today to raise money for victims of the Christchurch terror attacks.

    We have students and staff from dozens of different nationalities at our Auckland International Campus.

    Many brought food from their cultures to sell at today’s celebration. The event also included a Muslim prayer, performances of John Lennon’s Imagine on guitar and Tutira Mai on ukulele, and Indian dancing.

    We also sold green bracelets which people could wear to show their solidarity with the Muslim community.

    All money raised at the event will go toward the family of four-year-old girl, Alen Alsati, and her father, Waseem, who have been in hospital in Auckland following the attacks. A representative from their family attended today’s celebration.

    Check out the photos over on Facebook

  • OPAIC's IT students talk about their mini-project (April 1 2019)

    A group of OPAIC Graduate Diploma in Information Technology students recently finished their mini-project. The project involved developing a website for a property management company. Hear all about their experience in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV6GiPsjqQs

     

  • Call for abstracts: OP/SIT research symposium (August 6 2019)

    Deadline is 30 August for abstracts for 15 minute oral presentations of research undertaken by Southern Institute of Technology or Otago Polytechnic staff on any topic that has relevance to their ITP.

    Research can be co-authored with students however the lead researcher and presenter must be a staff member.

    Abstracts should include a title and discuss how the presentation will cover:

    1. The research aim/question
    2. The research design/methodology
    3. Ethics approval for the research
    4. The findings or results
    5. The implications for our teaching, professions and/or communities

    Maximum word length is 250 words. References are not required. Up to five key words may be included.

    Deadline for abstracts is Friday 30 August 2019. Click here to submit your abstract by email.

    Abstracts will be peer reviewed. Please provide in a separate document the submitter’s name/s, position/s, TEO name and a 50 word bio for each co-author with the title of the presentation.

    After the symposium abstracts will be published with presenters’ biographical information.

    Attendance at this event is free. It will be held on Monday 4 November 2019, from 9:30am to 5:00pm, at the Sargood Centre, Logan Park Drive, Dunedin.

    Questions? Please email research@op.ac.nz.

  • Public Exhibition: Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams - Te Wāhi Pounamu (to be continued) (March 27 2019)

    2 - 12 APRIL, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams
    ARCHIVES: Te Wāhi Pounamu (to be continued)

    EXHIBITION DATES: 2 - 12 April 2019

    EXHIBITION OPENING: Tuesday 2 April, 5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm

    Areta is Nohoaka Toi Kai Tahu (Kai Tahu Artist in Residence) in 2019.

    The situation of the artifact and Ng¯ai Tahu taonga from Te Waipounamu – The South Island, within museums in Aotearoa and abroad is foregrounded in the collaborative project of M¯aori artist Areta Wilkinson (Ng¯ai Tahu) and P¯akeh¯a artist Mark Adams. A residency at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, UK between 2009-17 allowed the artists to respond to those parts of collections with personal significance housed in English and German imperial museums. The pair produced unique silver bromide photograms of taonga and the tools and materials of their making. For Wilkinson, the project allowed a direct engagement with her whakapapa as a maker, and to produce new works from the absences in these photograms which directly reference the m¯atauranga M¯aori of her ancestors. For Adams, the project opened a way of engaging with the colonial relationships these artifacts and taonga are enmeshed in without messing with them. Repatriation return the shades of this cultural material and new manifestations of it to our eyes here.

    Areta Wilkinson is an artist of Ng¯ai Tahu descent, a M¯aori tribal group of Te Waipounamu the South Island of New Zealand. Wilkinson has investigated the intersection of contemporary jewellery as a form of applied knowledge and practice with M¯aori philosophies, especially whakapapa (genealogies) and a worldview informed by Ng¯ai Tahu perspectives. These ideas are articulated in her 2014 PhD Creative Arts with Massey University. Wilkinson’s work is seen in New Zealand public collections and current artworks are exhibited in the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9) at Queensland Art Gallery Museum of Modern Art (QAGOMA). Areta is Nohoaka Toi Kai Tahu (Kai Tahu Artist in Residence) in 2019.Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970. He subsequently became well known for work concerned with cross-cultural interactions around Rotorua, Samoan tatau (tattooing) among the diaspora in New Zealand, the voyages of Captain Cook and other dimensions of colonial history in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific, and in Europe. His work has been exhibited at biennales in Sao Paulo and Johannesburg, and otherwise in countries including Australia, Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

    Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970. He subsequently became well known for work concerned with cross-cultural interactions around Rotorua, Samoan tatau (tattooing) among the diaspora in New Zealand, the voyages of Captain Cook and other dimensions of colonial history in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific, and in Europe. His work has been exhibited at biennales in Sao Paulo and Johannesburg, and otherwise in countries including Australia, Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

     

  • Public Seminar: Functionalism, fandom and feminism, fragmentation & other “f” words (March 26 2019)

    THUR 4 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Ed Hanfling
    You Can Never Have Too Much of a Good Thing
    Taking in the First Church and functionalism, fandom and feminism, formalism and fragmentation, and other “f” words, Ed reflects on what he learned from writing a book and curating an exhibition on the art and design of contemporary modernist Roy Good.

    Ed Hanfling is an art historian, critic and curator who teaches art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art. His book Parallel Universe: The Art and Design of Roy Good was published in December 2018, and he curated an exhibition of the same title for Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery and Christchurch’s Centre of Contemporary Art.

  • Otago Polytechnic shows strong support for Muslim community (March 22 2019)

    Hundreds of Otago Polytechnic students, staff and whānau joined in a circle of peace outside Dunedin’s Al Huda Mosque on Friday 22 March, a week after the horrific attack on the Muslim community in Christchurch that left 50 dead.

    The group had earlier attended a service led by Kaitohutohu Janine Kapa and Chaplain Steve Downey in the atrium of Otago Polytechnic Hub on Forth St, before joining Acting Deputy Chief Executive Megan Gibbons on a walk to Al Huda Mosque, where they presented the Muslim community with a book of condolences and a signed banner featuring words of sympathy and support.

    Chaplain Steve Downey: “For me, aroha is the greatest gift we can give another person – that unconditional love, irrespective of any differences.

    “It is the love Jesus demonstrated more than 2000 years ago by laying His whole life down for people of all backgrounds, beliefs and status. 

    “So, today, we stand with every person in our nation as an expression of love and support – like many have been doing all week.  May this aroha continue to grow in our nation.”

    Today’s ceremony followed a silent march and civic vigil at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium on Thursday night, attended by an estimated 18,000 people. In memory of the 50 lives lost in Christchurch, Oonagh McGirr, DCE Learning and Teaching Services, lit a candle on behalf of Otago Polytechnic, as did 49 other representatives from a wide range of community groups.

    Phil Ker, CEO, Otago Polytechnic: “Our thoughts are with all of our Muslim alumni, students, staff members, friends and whānau, and with Otago Polytechnic's Christchurch community.

    “Otago Polytechnic stands strongly for diversity and inclusion, and strongly against intolerance and violence.

    “Over the past week we have seen many examples of our value of manaakitaka – caring – in action. Many Otago Polytechnic people are fundraising, organising events and supporting our students and whānau.”

     

  • Student Testimonial: Aishwarya Singh (March 22 2019)

    Hear business student Aishwarya Singh speak about what it was like to travel to a new country and begin studying at OPAIC over on our YouTube channel

  • Public Seminar: Paul Brobbel from the Len Lye Centre (March 21 2019)

    THUR 28 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Paul Brobbel
    Pretty good, for the 21st Century
    Len Lye’s claim that his work will be ‘pretty good, for the 21st century’ was a witty but prescient exclamation made in the 1960s at the peak of his career as a kinetic artist. In relation to this notion of the future, curator Paul Brobbel will reflect upon posthumous activities and exhibition making of Lye’s work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. He will introduce the various concepts at play at the Len Lye Centre, looking closely at the unique opportunities and challenges in building an internationally recognised programme around a single artist in provincial Aotearoa.

    Paul Brobbel is Senior Curator and Len Lye Curator at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre. In 2016 he was a Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Paul has worked at museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Auckland Museum and Puke Ariki. He has written extensively on the work of Len Lye including recent publications with the Getty Conservation Institute and Canterbury University Press.

  • Getting familiar with OPAIC (March 20 2019)

    Our newest students are getting acquainted with Otago Polytechnic Auckland International Campus this week.

    Students came together on campus yesterday for our Block 2 Orientation. They meet our executive and senior management staff and heard presentations from the Student Success and Employability teams in the morning.

    Chief Executive Gagan Sachdeva told students about some of the tricks that helped him integrate into the New Zealand way of life. They included embracing change, being positive, connecting, taking charge, and being curious.

    “Remind yourself every day that this is one of the most beautiful places in the world.”

    Executive Director: Academic Alex McKegg told students about the school’s focus on experiential learning. Students wouldn’t just develop their subject matter knowledge but also their capabilities such as critical thinking, communication, and analysis.

    She encouraged all students to work hard, set high standards for themselves and ask for help when they needed it.

    Burger Fuel put lunch and activities on for the students during their break.  

    In the afternoon they listened to talks by New Zealand Police and Southern Cross Insurance. The day ended with a Maori Cultural Performance by Te Wehi Haka, The Haka Experience.

    Today Students will be introduced to their academic programmes and will have the opportunity to learn more about employability.

  • Public Seminar: Repatriation - Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams (March 18 2019)

    THUR 21 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams (a collaboration)
    Repatriation
    The situation of the artifact and Ng¯ai Tahu taonga from Te Waipounamu – The South Island, within museums in Aotearoa and abroad is foregrounded in the collaborative project of M¯aori artist Areta Wilkinson (Ng¯ai Tahu) and P¯akeh¯a artist Mark Adams. A residency at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, UK between 2009-17 allowed the artists to respond to those parts of collections with personal significance housed in English and German imperial museums. The pair produced unique silver bromide photograms of taonga and the tools and materials of their making. For Wilkinson, the project allowed a direct engagement with her whakapapa as a maker, and to produce new works from the absences in these photograms which directly reference the m¯atauranga M¯aori of her ancestors. For Adams, the project opened a way of engaging with the colonial relationships these artifacts and taonga are enmeshed in without messing with them. Repatriation return the shades of this cultural material and new manifestations of it to our eyes here.

    Areta Wilkinson is an artist of Ng¯ai Tahu descent, a M¯aori tribal group of Te Waipounamu the South Island of New Zealand. Wilkinson has investigated the intersection of contemporary jewellery as a form of applied knowledge and practice with M¯aori philosophies, especially whakapapa (genealogies) and a worldview informed by Ng¯ai Tahu perspectives. These ideas are articulated in her 2014 PhD Creative Arts with Massey University. Wilkinson’s work is seen in New Zealand public collections and current artworks are exhibited in the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9) at Queensland Art Gallery Museum of Modern Art (QAGOMA). Areta is Nohoaka Toi Kai Tahu (Kai Tahu Artist in Residence) in 2019.

    Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970. He subsequently became well known for work concerned with cross-cultural interactions around Rotorua, Samoan tatau (tattooing) among the diaspora in New Zealand, the voyages of Captain Cook and other dimensions of colonial history in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific, and in Europe. His work has been exhibited at biennales in Sao Paulo and Johannesburg, and otherwise in countries including Australia, Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand.


  • OP students collecting money for Christchurch victims (March 18 2019)

    OP's Dunedin students held a working bee in The Hub on Sunday 17 March, creating thousands of black ribbons which they will sell to raise money to support the victims of the Christchurch massacre. 

    About 100 students, powered by pizza and chips, worked through the day to create the ribbons. 

    The ribbons will be available for purchase on campus and around Dunedin City. 

    You can find more information on the Otago Daily Times website.

  • Supporting our Muslim, OPAIC and CHCH whanau (March 18 2019)

    The events in Christchurch are unprecedented acts of violence in Aotearoa New Zealand and have left us shocked and deeply saddened. In the words of our Prime Minister, "this is not who we are."

    Our thoughts are with all of our Muslim students, staff members, friends and whanau, and with Otago Polytechnic's Christchurch community. Otago Polytechnic stands strongly for diversity and inclusion, and strongly against intolerance and violence.

    Over the weekend, we have seen our value of manaakitaka - caring - in action. Many of you have already reached out asking how you can help. A team of us are working on ways for the Otago Polytechnic community to show our support for our Muslim and Christchurch whanau so that we can demonstrate our three other values - m¯aia (courage), takohaka (accountability) and whakamanataka (empowerment) and show solidarity together.

    He waka eke noa

    A canoe which we are all in with no exception"

     

    Ways to help

    We are all reeling from the attacks in Christchurch on Friday and wondering what we can do to help. Here are some things that you can do: 

    Donate money to the victims and their families

    Show your support to our Muslim community

    Volunteer

    What not to do

    There are also some things that you should not do.

    • Do not watch or circulate footage / images of the attack
    • Do not share images or information about the attacker 

    What if I need support?

    • Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition has set up a number of call centres. Details can be found here
    • Call or text 1737 to speak to a trained counsellor
    • Call Victim Support on 0800 842 846
  • Dream work experience on offer to brewing students (March 16 2019)

    Students from New Zealand’s newest brewing course will soon have access to an exclusive work experience opportunity: to put their palates to the test as associate judges at one of the country’s largest beer and cider awards.

    The new scholarship for select students from Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago-based brewing certificate programme was announced this week (15 March) at the New World Beer & Cider Awards judging in Wellington.

    The offer will see up to two students each year given a place at the New World Beer & Cider Awards judging tables, including covering the costs of their travel and accommodation, so they can learn the ropes of beer judging from some of the country’s most respected experts.

    The awards programme already includes the unique opportunity for New World team members to act as associate judges, upskilling their beer and cider knowledge to share with customers and staff.

    Chair of Judges for the awards, Michael Donaldson, expects the scholarship slots to be extremely sought-after, and not just because the ‘work experience ’involves tasting between 40 and 50 beers per day.

    “Many of our senior judges have worked in the industry for years before moving into judging, so getting the chance to do this early on in your training is pretty special. Our collaborative approach to beer judging also makes for a great learning environment for up-and-coming talent and we are all really pleased to be able to give a little back to the industry in this way.”

    He says while judging is always fun, it’s also fast-paced and carries the responsibility of critiquing products into which brewers have put their hearts and souls.

    “Judges have to have the sensory skills as well as a way with words to capture what they experience with each entry. While their scores do not count towards the final results, they are a critical part of the table, contributing to the discussion and keeping notes.”

    Brewing Lecturer Geoff Collie say’s the scholarship is a great fit with Otago Polytechnic’s approach to the new training courses – New Zealand’s first ever suite of NZQA-approved brewing qualifications, which have been crafted to meet industry needs and support practical learning.

    In addition to theory, students will also be getting their hands dirty at Rough Rock Brewing Co, the brand-new commercial brewery-come-classroom at Bannockburn, Central Otago, which comprises an important and distinctive part of the courses.

    “We are offering a flipped model of education. What this means is that students need to come to class having pre-studied the topic, to contribute to a higher level of learning.

    “As the first suite of brewing qualifications in New Zealand, it really is the best opportunity for a career pathway into the industry. Our aim? To craft the brewers of the future.”

    The New Zealand Certificate in Brewing (Level 4) welcomed its first intake of students in February this year. The full-time one-year programme has been designed for those with a passion for brewing who want to get into the industry, or are seeking to enhance their knowledge and skills.

    Learners can build on those skills via the six-month Level 5 New Zealand Certificate in Brewing, and a one-year New Zealand Diploma in Brewing (Level 6), both of which are offered via CapableNZ and suit those already working in the industry.

    The first New World Beer & Cider Awards scholarship recipients will be selected by a joint panel against key criteria from students in the 2019 Level 4 course, who will join in the 2020 judging event.

    Read about our brewing programme

     

  • Student Profile: Samuel Alonso (March 16 2019)

    Business student Samuel Alonso came to New Zealand for some valuable experience in an international environment.

    Sam was born in Venezuela, but his family is Spanish, and Spain is his home. He completed a master’s degree and worked as a finance manager for hotels prior to coming to OPAIC.

    He decided to move to New Zealand because he was looking for a place to improve his English.

    “I realised that this is a country with a lot of job opportunities, business opportunities and at the same time has amazing nature and I’m a nature lover.”

    His research showed OPAIC was affordable and well-ranked so he enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Applied Management.

    Sam says he’s learning about management in general and business in New Zealand. He says a lot of educational material is available to him at OPAIC.

    He’s looking forward to starting his industry placement and learning even more about the Kiwi work environment.

    “Something that I really like about this school is that it’s really focused on the labour market.”

    The teachers have industry experience and share their knowledge.

    Living in New Zealand has been a huge change for him but he considers the move a very good decision.

     “Probably in the future I will realise, wow, it was an amazing experience, because I will be in a better position than before.”

    After Sam graduates, he’d like to work in New Zealand for a year or two, then he will probably return home.

    “But I know that I will have the opportunity to find a better position, because my English is going to be better and I will have more international experience. That is something that nowadays is very important.”

    Eventually, he’d like to have his own international company and work around the world. For that he needs a good command of the English language.

    Sam says New Zealand is a country with a very good combination of nature, quality of life, and opportunities. Additionally, you can find people from all over the world here.

    He thinks New Zealand is a great study destination for those from Spain and Latin America.

    It offers an amazing opportunity for those from Spain to learn more about this side of the world.

    “They’ll get different knowledge and different life experience that for sure is going to be amazing for them. They will grow personally and professionally.”

    It’s a very good option for those from Latin America who are looking for new opportunities to improve their English and have an experience in an English speaking country.

     “It’s a new country with a lot of opportunities and it’s growing so fast.”

  • Fashion graduate excited to show at iD International Emerging Designer Awards (March 16 2019)

    This is the story of a girl who just wanted pink hair. Or to be precise, this is a story about the woman behind the story of a girl who just wanted pink hair.

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design Honours student Rosette Hailes-Paku is a finalist in the iD International Emerging Designer Awards, to be held at the Regent Theatre, Dunedin, on Friday and Saturday, 15-16 March.

    Rosette and Otago Polytechnic Fashion graduate Phoebe Lee are among more than 30 talented designers who will show their collections at the awards, being held as part of iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

    And the title of Rosette’s collection?

    “It’s called ‘The story of a girl who just wanted pink hair’ and is inspired by formative experiences in my life.”

    Rosette, who graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) at the end of 2018 and has returned this year to complete Honours, still can’t quite believe her collection will be showcased on such a scale.

    “For the last two years I have helped dress models for the show as well as helping at fittings and was involved in organising a pop-up shop on George St during iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

    “I get so inspired after seeing everyone’s collections and I can’t believe I am now one of the designers showing my collection in the show. I think the experience of having been backstage at a couple of the shows will help me settle my nerves a bit, but I’m still nervous about judging day!

    “After working on a collection for so long, it’s really awesome to have the opportunity to have my work shown on stage among a group of other young talented designers from all over the world.”

    “My initial inspiration came from my experience attending Catholic school throughout primary and high school. I felt like I was in a place I didn’t belong or fit in.

    “I started by taking aspects associated with my school uniform. This included a tartan design. I worked with Otago Knitwear to get my pattern knitted into a merino knit that is used throughout the collection.

    “I also wanted to include elements of a straitjacket to symbolise the restrictive aspects of a school uniform. I used boning in the pants and kilt) so they would appear restrictive around the waist, as well as straps and tabs with eyelets so they could be pulled even tighter – in contrast with free-flowing pants and large knife-pleats representing a sense of freedom.

    “My colour palette was inspired by the contrast between the sense of rebellion I felt while still being young and innocent and I thought pink and black would represent this best,” Rosette explains.

    “My goal is to shed light on things that are pushed to the side, things that people don't want to talk about, things that may offend, and things that go against popular opinion.”

    Supported by Otago Polytechnic, the iD International Emerging Designer Awards is Australasia’s only international young designer competition.

    The emerging designer will each show five garments, which will be assessed by a panel of New Zealand fashion designers: Tanya Carlson, Benny Castles (WORLD), Margi Robertson (NOM*d) and Kate Sylvester, as well as VIVA editor Amanda Linnell.

    The iD International Emerging Designers will show at both nights of the iD Dunedin Fashion Show. Winners of the iD International Emerging Designer Awards will be announced during the Friday show and all the finalists’ collections and the winners’ announcement will be repeated on Saturday.

     

     

     

     

  • Public Exhibition: Dunedin School of Art Staff 2019 (March 13 2019)

    19– 29 MARCH (Monday 25th March is a holiday), DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    GET STAFFED!

    Dunedin School of Art 

    Staff Exhibition 2019

    DSA GALLERY: Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    EXHIBITION DATES:  19 - 29 March, 2019

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

  • Fashion graduate set to leap into iD International Emerging Designer Awards (March 12 2019)

    Doodling, dexterity and discipline inform the work of Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Phoebe Lee, one of more than 30 talented designers selected for the iD International Emerging Designer Awards, which will held at the Regent Theatre on 15-16 March as part of iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

    And when Phoebe talks about black belts, she’s not referring to any fashion accessory. She means a taekwondo black belt, a level of martial arts proficiency she attained a few years back.

    As Phoebe has discovered, there are connections between the seemingly disparate worlds of fashion and flying kicks. She knows full well that when discipline meets dexterity, great things can be accomplished.

    Phoebe recalls a “lightbulb moment” early in Bachelor of Design (Fashion) studies at Otago Polytechnic.

    “My very first Fashion Design Studio project in year one surprised me a lot. The brief was to create an outfit, with ‘Utilitarian’ as the theme, and it had to be made using only black and white.

    “I remember I had filled up an A3 book with all sorts of designs inspired by my Chinese heritage, including traditional dress from Asian countries. I tied the Yin-Yang philosophy into my inspirations, and my experiences becoming a black belt in the Korean martial art of taekwondo and the femininity behind it.

    “It was so exciting to come up with a great design but, because of my lack of experience in the ground-work of construction, I struggled to resolve how my design would come to life, and sit on the body the way I wanted it to.

    “It was a real ‘lightbulb’ moment when I figured out how my off-the-shoulder top could be assembled. After the project, my garment was put on display alongside my workbook as part of Otago Polytechnic’s 2016 Debrief exhibition; I also had a mini fashion show with friends.

    “I realised that no matter how hard this degree was going to be, I could push through and I achieve it.”

    Fast-forward a couple of years: Phoebe is about to showcase her designs as part of the iD International Emerging Designer Awards, which will held at the Regent Theatre on Friday and Saturday.

    One of more than 30 young designers from around the world to be selected for the awards, Phoebe says being a finalist is “a really great validation of my creativity”.

    “It feels really good to be noticed, that my designs are creative enough to be a part of this extraordinary event. I feel like three years of hard work and perseverance have paid off.”

    “The title of my collection is called ‘Dream Love Thrive Create’. The words sum up my design philosophy and way of life. DLTC is cute, gawky, funky and edgy.”

    Phoebe says the works she will show at the Emerging Designer Awards build on her 2018 graduate collection.

    “I am inspired by other realms of creativity. For example, I made a black bomber jacket, and had the soft cushiony material digitally printed with my own fabric design, for which I assembled a big collage of my various doodlings, drawings and illustrations based on ideas about dreams, love, and creativity.

    “I also incorporated illustrations of what I call ‘nymphs’. They are alien-looking females with big circles of blush on their cheeks and forehead, big lips and with large fawn ears, with varying hair colours and styles.

    “I hand-painted a dozen of these characters on to vegan leatherette and integrated them throughout my collection. Some were sewn on to garments as patches in various sizes; others have been made into key-chains. I’ve also digitally printed them on to fabric.” 

    Phoebe says she is looking to grow her “Dream Love Thrive Create” brand.

    “I’d love to be selling worldwide online. For now, I am delving back into other kinds of creative work. I want to experiment and find other ways where I can express what DLTC means to me through other mediums.”

    In the meantime, she has an awards show to get to.

    Read more about our design programmes

     

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Kaupapa Kāi Tahu) (March 8 2019)

    We are now calling for papers for an issue of Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Kaupapa Kāi Tahu)  5: Mauri Ora | Human Flourishing to be publshed in 2019.

    Building on the success of our recent Māori Research Symposium: Mauri Ora, Human Flourishing (November 9, 2018), we invite your contribution to Kaupapa Kāi Tahu Scope 2019. This special issue is focused on the symposium theme of Mauri Ora | Human Flourishing, which will highlight the diverse multidisciplinary Māori research fields that contribute towards an holistic vision of human flourishing and wellbeing from across the Otago Polytechnic and wider research community.  We welcome your expression of interest for peer review by 30 April 2019, with a final cut-off date of 31 May 2019 to submit your full paper to Kaitohutohu@op.ac.nz  Any queries regarding submission guidelines can be directed to kelli.temaiharoa@op.ac.nz  

    SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

    Please ensure the following specifications are met for text and images in all submissions to Scope: Kaupapa Kāi Tahu 2019.

    TEXT

    • Please submit only Word documents (see www.thescopes.org for examples of acceptable submissions)
    • Single line spacing
    • Word limit of 1-4000 words
    • Clearly name your file, e.g. “smith.doc”
    • Written in first or third person, other formats will also be considered.
    • Please do not apply indentations, tabulations or any such formatting to text.
    • Specific typographic requirements relevant to the text layout, outside the Scope House style (e.g. for artists’ pages), should be discussed with the editor and hardcopy must be provided with the unformatted word document showing desired formatting (e.g. for poems).
    • Referencing should be in the form of ENDNOTES with superscripted Arabic numerals in text.
    • References to follow the Chicago Style (http://otago.libguides.com/c.php?g=171590&p=1130401&_ga=1.75558165.1023 919255.1493593720)
    • As no extra reference list is required, please include all bibliographical details in the endnotes (see examples at www.thescopes.org)
    • Captions for images should be numbered, should be complete and should adhere to a sequence of information (see examples at www.thescopes.org)

    IMAGES

    Format: Images must be supplied as jpeg, tif formats or 300DPI format.
    Colour: Greyscale or CMYK (check under image > mode in Photoshop).
    Quality: 300dpi minimum at printed image size. Maximum image print area is 140mm wide x 190 deep.
    Orientation: Ensure your image is oriented correctly.
    Labelling: Name all image files with your name and number the images in the order they appear in your document, e.g. “smith.1.tif”, “smith.2.tif”.

    IN SUMMARY

    • Send a digital Word document (with your name withheld) to the Scope Editorial Team at kaitohutohu@op.ac.nz on or before 31 May 2019.
    • Where relevant, include low resolution images (maximum 72dpi) in your text where you would have them placed with full captions underneath them.
    • Supply the following information on a separate cover page:
      1. Name of author(s)
      2. Contact email, telephone number and postal address
      3. Number of images included in text
      4. Author’s biography: please submit a short bio which includes your institutional affiliation where relevant (see examples at www.thescopes.org)
    • Email or send via an online drop-box or post a CD/pen drive with high quality images (minimum 300dpi) saved as jpeg or tif. If it is a vector graphic, provide in eps format. Please label all image files and number them in the order you wish them to appear. Please note combined 10MB limit on emailed items (images may need to be sent separately).
    • Please send to: Scope Editorial Team Kaitohutohu Office Otago Polytechnic Private Bag 1910 Dunedin.
  • Public Seminar: Yvonne Shaw The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious (March 7 2019)

     THUR 14 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

     

     Yvonne Shaw

    The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious
    A type of transference takes place in the staging of a photograph. Tensions that are evoked by proximity to others and by the presence of the camera are communicated via gesture and expression. By drawing attention to interiority and ambiguity, Yvonne Shaw illuminates these unconscious tensions within her photographic series The Residual. Informed by Julia Kristeva's theories of alterity and Sigmund Freud's writings on the unconscious, The Residual presents moments that hover between staged fiction and the authentic awkwardness of strangers encountering each other.


    "It is through unraveling transference ... that, on the basis of the other, I become reconciled with my own othernessforeignness,
    that I play on it and live by it." -Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves

    Yvonne Shaw is an Auckland-based artist who uses photographic portraiture to explore psychological relations between people. Situating models in various urban locations she constructs images that evoke the complex tensions of social encounters. She has an MFA with First Class Honours from Elam School of Fine Arts. Her photographs and photobooks have been exhibited in New Zealand and Australia. In 2018 she was awarded the Second Runnerup Award in the 27th Annual Wallace Art Awards.

  • Public Seminar: Yvonne Shaw The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious (March 7 2019)

    THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Yvonne Shaw
    The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious
    A type of transference takes place in the staging of a photograph. Tensions that are evoked by proximity to others and by the presence of the camera are communicated via gesture and expression. By drawing attention to interiority and ambiguity, Yvonne Shaw illuminates these unconscious tensions within her photographic series The Residual. Informed by Julia Kristeva's theories of alterity and Sigmund Freud's writings on the unconscious, The Residual presents moments that hover between staged fiction and the authentic awkwardness of strangers encountering each other.


    "It is through unraveling transference ... that, on the basis of the other, I become reconciled with my own othernessforeignness,
    that I play on it and live by it." -Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves

    Yvonne Shaw is an Auckland-based artist who uses photographic portraiture to explore psychological relations between people. Situating models in various urban locations she constructs images that evoke the complex tensions of social encounters. She has an MFA with First Class Honours from Elam School of Fine Arts. Her photographs and photobooks have been exhibited in New Zealand and Australia. In 2018 she was awarded the Second Runnerup Award in the 27th Annual Wallace Art Awards.

  • Term 1 Public Seminars: Lunchtime Programme (March 7 2019)

    Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar Schedule Term 1, 2019

    Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar Schedule Term 1, 2019


    THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST. 

    Kevin Fisher
    Post-cinematic Ontology and the Reversibility of the Flesh
    In this presentation I argue that theorizations of the ontology of cinema reproduce what Heidegger describes as the tendency of Western metaphysics to mistake “ontic” questions about the objective existence of beings for properly “ontological” questions which concern the possibility for reflexive Being, or Dasein. My critique applies equally to accounts of analog and digital cinema insofar as both privilege determinations of ontology on the basis of the materiality or immateriality of the medial substrate. Instead, I propose that the conditions of ontology set forth by Heidegger are more fully realised in the cinema’s ability to enact the chiasmatic reversibility of subject and object in what Merleau-Ponty describes as the flesh of the world. I will show how, within the context of Sobchack’s description of film’s body, the chiasm of this reversibility is activated around the hinge of the cut and through the formal devices associated with it. As such, my approach reverses the longstanding association of ontology with the profilmic qualities of the indexical image, and disengages it from traditional understandings of media specificity. I’ll also suggest how this argument extends a minority position within film studies, which describes cinema ontology as a product of movement rather than representation.

    Dr Kevin Fisher is a Senior Lecturer in Media Film and Communication at the University of Otago. His research interests include film theory, phenomenology, documentary and genre studies.
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    THUR 7 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Caroline McQuarrie
    Mining Histories: West Coast Projects
    Since 2011 Caroline McQuarrie has been engaging with the history of the West Coast region, exploring what it meant for 19th and early 20th century settlers to make a home in a region which was physically difficult, and previously occupied. Employing photography as a primary medium, but augmenting it with embroidery, weaving and video, McQuarrie has explored abandoned mining towns, deep marks left on the landscape by mining, and heroic colonial journeys. In this seminar she will discuss her projects No Town, Homewardbounder, Waiuta and Prospects Fearful, and the difficulties for an artist engaging colonial histories in a post-colonial country.

    Caroline McQuarrie is an interdisciplinary artist whose primary interest is the concept of home, whether it is located in a domestic space, a community or the land we identify with. She works with photography, video and craft practices to explore meaning carried in photographic and craft based objects and domestic, suburban or community sites. Her work explores how the photographic representation of a site with a particular history can reflect on the present. Caroline is a Lecturer in Photography at Whiti o Rehua School of Art, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.
    ___________________________________________________________________________ 

    THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Yvonne Shaw
    The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious
    A type of transference takes place in the staging of a photograph. Tensions that are evoked by proximity to others and by the presence of the camera are communicated via gesture and expression. By drawing attention to interiority and ambiguity, Yvonne Shaw illuminates these unconscious tensions within her photographic series The Residual. Informed by Julia Kristeva's theories of alterity and Sigmund Freud's writings on the unconscious, The Residual presents moments that hover between staged fiction and the authentic awkwardness of strangers encountering each other.


    "It is through unraveling transference ... that, on the basis of the other, I become reconciled with my own othernessforeignness,
    that I play on it and live by it." -Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves

    Yvonne Shaw is an Auckland-based artist who uses photographic portraiture to explore psychological relations between people. Situating models in various urban locations she constructs images that evoke the complex tensions of social encounters. She has an MFA with First Class Honours from Elam School of Fine Arts. Her photographs and photobooks have been exhibited in New Zealand and Australia. In 2018 she was awarded the Second Runnerup Award in the 27th Annual Wallace Art Awards.
    __________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 21 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams (a collaboration)
    Repatriation
    The situation of the artifact and Ng¯ai Tahu taonga from Te Waipounamu – The South Island, within museums in Aotearoa and abroad is foregrounded in the collaborative project of M¯aori artist Areta Wilkinson (Ng¯ai Tahu) and P¯akeh¯a artist Mark Adams. A residency at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, UK between 2009-17 allowed the artists to respond to those parts of collections with personal significance housed in English and German imperial museums. The pair produced unique silver bromide photograms of taonga and the tools and materials of their making. For Wilkinson, the project allowed a direct engagement with her whakapapa as a maker, and to produce new works from the absences in these photograms which directly reference the m¯atauranga M¯aori of her ancestors. For Adams, the project opened a way of engaging with the colonial relationships these artifacts and taonga are enmeshed in without messing with them. Repatriation return the shades of this cultural material and new manifestations of it to our eyes here.

    Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970. He subsequently became well known for work concerned with cross-cultural interactions around Rotorua, Samoan tatau (tattooing) among the diaspora in New Zealand, the voyages of Captain Cook and other dimensions of colonial history in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific, and in Europe. His work has been exhibited at biennales in Sao Paulo and Johannesburg, and otherwise in countries including Australia, Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

    Areta Wilkinson is an artist of Ng¯ai Tahu descent, a M¯aori tribal group of Te Waipounamu the South Island of New Zealand. Wilkinson has investigated the intersection of contemporary jewellery as a form of applied knowledge and practice with M¯aori philosophies, especially whakapapa (genealogies) and a worldview informed by Ng¯ai Tahu perspectives. These ideas are articulated in her 2014 PhD Creative Arts with Massey University. Wilkinson’s work is seen in New Zealand public collections and current artworks are exhibited in the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9) at Queensland Art Gallery Museum of Modern Art (QAGOMA).
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 28 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Paul Brobbel
    Pretty good, for the 21st Century
    Len Lye’s claim that his work will be ‘pretty good, for the 21st century’ was a witty but prescient exclamation made in the 1960s at the peak of his career as a kinetic artist. In relation to this notion of the future, curator Paul Brobbel will reflect upon posthumous activities and exhibition making of Lye’s work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. He will introduce the various concepts at play at the Len Lye Centre, looking closely at the unique opportunities and challenges in building an internationally recognised programme around a single artist in provincial Aotearoa.

    Paul Brobbel is Senior Curator and Len Lye Curator at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre. In 2016 he was a Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Paul has worked at museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Auckland Museum and Puke Ariki. He has written extensively on the work of Len Lye including recent publications with the Getty Conservation Institute and Canterbury University Press.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 4 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

     Ed Hanfling
    You Can Never Have Too Much of a Good Thing
    Taking in the First Church and functionalism, fandom and feminism, formalism and fragmentation, and other “f” words, Ed reflects on what he learned from writing a book and curating an exhibition on the art and design of contemporary modernist Roy Good.

    Ed Hanfling is an art historian, critic and curator who teaches art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art. His book Parallel Universe: The Art and Design of Roy Good was published in December 2018, and he curated an exhibition of the same title for Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery and Christchurch’s Centre of Contemporary Art.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 11 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Susan Best
    Intimacy with Strangers: Nat Randall and Anna Breckon's The Second Woman
    This paper examines one contemporary participatory performance that centres on a romantic couple: a twenty-four hour performance work by Anna Breckon and Nat Randall called The Second Woman (2016). This work uses the serial method established by conceptual art as an impersonal mode to present 100 intimate encounters between Nat Randall and the various men who answered a call out to participate. The work repeats a scene between a woman and her lover where disconnection and repair figure. The men are at once highly individual and yet also interchangeable, disposable and substitutable (like a contemporary Tinder dating app, the men slide past quickly into a blur). Randall has an astonishing capacity to accommodate each man and his approach to the narrative and the performance, I analyse her approach to seriality using the idea of "the law of the mother" developed by British psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell.

    Susan Best is an art historian and occasional curator, specialising in modern and contemporary art. Her books include Visualizing Feeling: Affect and the Feminine Avant-garde (2011) and Reparative Aesthetics: Witnessing in Contemporary Art Photography (2016). Both books won the Australia and New Zealand Art Association best book prize. She is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

     

  • Community turns out in force to support Otago Polytechnic (March 6 2019)

    Around 400 members of the public, including local Iwi, Pasifika, elected officials, business stakeholders and community groups, turned out last night to support Otago Polytechnic – as well as question Minister of Education Chris Hipkins over the Government’s proposal to reform the vocational education sector. 

    The consultation session featured reasoned, impassioned and, notably, respectful dialogue and questions from a wide cross-section of the community, who reminded Minister Hipkins that Otago Polytechnic is a strong, stable, flexible and innovative organisation that brings significant economic and cultural benefits to Otago and further afield. 

    Earlier in the day, more than 300 Otago Polytechnic staff expressed similar views during a consultation event with the Minister and Tertiary Education Commission Chief Executive Tim Fowler. 

    Otago Polytechnic is supportive of most of the Minister’s proposals, which signal well overdue change for vocational education in New Zealand.

    Indeed, two of the Minister’s proposals are to be applauded – i.e. a fit-for-purpose funding system and the establishment of a more seamless training system that integrates learning in work with learning in institutions.

    The transfer of all industry training to polytechnics also makes sense, and will benefit learners with a simpler system and the high-quality learner support which underpins polytechnic provision. 

    However, members of staff, as well as the public, consistently expressed concern about the Government’s proposal to merge the current 16 public Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) into a single entity – the New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology.

    There are concerns such a model would seriously constrain Otago Polytechnic as a regionally responsive institution and potentially see all-important decisions about vocational education in Otago made by a head office somewhere else in New Zealand. 

    The Minister clearly indicated he is open to changing the proposed model and that the consultation process should be regarded as a genuine desire by Government to engage in meaningful dialogue with its communities. 

    He also reiterated that he is seeking a vocational educational model that combines the best of a centralised approach with well-funded, regionally responsive institutions.  

    The consultation period lasts until 27 March. Otago Polytechnic encourages all of our partners, stakeholders and community to have their say.

    Find out more 

  • Success Story: Abzal Ongarbaev (March 5 2019)

    Abzal Ongarbaev made his childhood dream a reality when he came to New Zealand from Kazakhstan to study.

    He completed a Bachelor in Computing and Software Development back home and worked in the IT field for almost 10 years prior to joining OPAIC.

    Abzal realised he would benefit from some international experience and chose to come to New Zealand because he’d wanted to visit since he was a child.

    “I really was dreaming about this, all my friends too.”

    They’d seen pictures of the country and heard stories. They thought it looked like a really interesting place, but it had seemed so far away when they were young.

     “When you’re young you want to do all these crazy things.”

    Abzal’s childhood friends are realising their dreams too. One friend is living here, another will arrive this winter and more plan to make the trip in the future.

    Abzal said there were a number of schools he could have enrolled at. He choose OPAIC because of the ratings and feedback it had received and because of the study programmes and teachers here.

    “The best part of studying in OPAIC is getting knowledge and experience from greatest teachers.”

    His favourite part of the programme was data science. It was a hard course at first. However, he came to understand how valuable the knowledge of data science is.

    “It was very useful and I just use all this knowledge in my job.”

    Abzal’s been working for the New Zealand company Seismo Limited as a Software Developer.

    He and his colleagues have designed a standalone seismic sensor they use to collect data about how buildings move in order to understand how to stabilise them.

    He worked at the company as a student, then continued full-time after he graduated last November.

    He’s just secured another position as Senior Server Side Developer at The Warehouse Group Investments.

    One of the best parts about New Zealand is the work-life balance, according to Abzal.

    Another is the local people – he says Kiwis are very kind.

    Abzal’s made new friends in New Zealand including Kiwis, Hungarians and Italians.

    He likes hanging out with his Kiwi friends because it gives him a chance to practice his English.

    He advised other students from his part of the world thinking of enrolling at OPAIC not to be afraid.

    “Studying in OPAIC is a key for new opportunities.”

  • Public Seminar: Caroline McQuarrie Mining Histories - West Coast Projects (February 27 2019)

    THUR 7 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Caroline McQuarrie
    Mining Histories: West Coast Projects
    Since 2011 Caroline McQuarrie has been engaging with the history of the West Coast region, exploring what it meant for 19th and early 20th century settlers to make a home in a region which was physically difficult, and previously occupied. Employing photography as a primary medium, but augmenting it with embroidery, weaving and video, McQuarrie has explored abandoned mining towns, deep marks left on the landscape by mining, and heroic colonial journeys. In this seminar she will discuss her projects No Town, Homewardbounder, Waiuta and Prospects Fearful, and the difficulties for an artist engaging colonial histories in a post-colonial country.

    Caroline McQuarrie is an interdisciplinary artist whose primary interest is the concept of home, whether it is located in a domestic space, a community or the land we identify with. She works with photography, video and craft practices to explore meaning carried in photographic and craft based objects and domestic, suburban or community sites. Her work explores how the photographic representation of a site with a particular history can reflect on the present. Caroline is a Lecturer in Photography at Whiti o Rehua School of Art, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.

  • Public Seminar: Kevin Fisher - Senior Lecturer in Media Film and Communication (February 27 2019)

    THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.
    Kevin Fisher
    Post-cinematic Ontology and the Reversibility of the Flesh
    In this presentation I argue that theorizations of the ontology of cinema reproduce what Heidegger describes as the tendency of Western metaphysics to mistake “ontic” questions about the objective existence of beings for properly “ontological” questions which concern the possibility for reflexive Being, or Dasein. My critique applies equally to accounts of analog and digital cinema insofar as both privilege determinations of ontology on the basis of the materiality or immateriality of the medial substrate. Instead, I propose that the conditions of ontology set forth by Heidegger are more fully realised in the cinema’s ability to enact the chiasmatic reversibility of subject and object in what Merleau-Ponty describes as the flesh of the world. I will show how, within the context of Sobchack’s description of film’s body, the chiasm of this reversibility is activated around the hinge of the cut and through the formal devices associated with it. As such, my approach reverses the longstanding association of ontology with the profilmic qualities of the indexical image, and disengages it from traditional understandings of media specificity. I’ll also suggest how this argument extends a minority position within film studies, which describes cinema ontology as a product of movement rather than representation.

    Dr Kevin Fisher is a Senior Lecturer in Media Film and Communication at the University of Otago. His research interests include film theory, phenomenology, documentary and genre studies

  • Public Seminar Programme. Dunedin School of Art TERM ONE, 2019 (February 25 2019)

    Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar Schedule Term 1, 2019

    Dunedin School of Art Lunchtime Research Seminar Schedule Term 1, 2019


    THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.
    Kevin Fisher
    Post-cinematic Ontology and the Reversibility of the Flesh
    In this presentation I argue that theorizations of the ontology of cinema reproduce what Heidegger describes as the tendency of Western metaphysics to mistake “ontic” questions about the objective existence of beings for properly “ontological” questions which concern the possibility for reflexive Being, or Dasein. My critique applies equally to accounts of analog and digital cinema insofar as both privilege determinations of ontology on the basis of the materiality or immateriality of the medial substrate. Instead, I propose that the conditions of ontology set forth by Heidegger are more fully realised in the cinema’s ability to enact the chiasmatic reversibility of subject and object in what Merleau-Ponty describes as the flesh of the world. I will show how, within the context of Sobchack’s description of film’s body, the chiasm of this reversibility is activated around the hinge of the cut and through the formal devices associated with it. As such, my approach reverses the longstanding association of ontology with the profilmic qualities of the indexical image, and disengages it from traditional understandings of media specificity. I’ll also suggest how this argument extends a minority position within film studies, which describes cinema ontology as a product of movement rather than representation.

    Dr Kevin Fisher is a Senior Lecturer in Media Film and Communication at the University of Otago. His research interests include film theory, phenomenology, documentary and genre studies.
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    THUR 7 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Caroline McQuarrie
    Mining Histories: West Coast Projects
    Since 2011 Caroline McQuarrie has been engaging with the history of the West Coast region, exploring what it meant for 19th and early 20th century settlers to make a home in a region which was physically difficult, and previously occupied. Employing photography as a primary medium, but augmenting it with embroidery, weaving and video, McQuarrie has explored abandoned mining towns, deep marks left on the landscape by mining, and heroic colonial journeys. In this seminar she will discuss her projects No Town, Homewardbounder, Waiuta and Prospects Fearful, and the difficulties for an artist engaging colonial histories in a post-colonial country.

    Caroline McQuarrie is an interdisciplinary artist whose primary interest is the concept of home, whether it is located in a domestic space, a community or the land we identify with. She works with photography, video and craft practices to explore meaning carried in photographic and craft based objects and domestic, suburban or community sites. Her work explores how the photographic representation of a site with a particular history can reflect on the present. Caroline is a Lecturer in Photography at Whiti o Rehua School of Art, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.
    ___________________________________________________________________________ THUR 28 FEB, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.
    12.00 – 1.00 pm Thursday 14th March. Venue P152
    Yvonne Shaw
    The Residual: Photography, Kristeva and the Unconscious
    A type of transference takes place in the staging of a photograph. Tensions that are evoked by proximity to others and by the presence of the camera are communicated via gesture and expression. By drawing attention to interiority and ambiguity, Yvonne Shaw illuminates these unconscious tensions within her photographic series The Residual. Informed by Julia Kristeva's theories of alterity and Sigmund Freud's writings on the unconscious, The Residual presents moments that hover between staged fiction and the authentic awkwardness of strangers encountering each other.


    "It is through unraveling transference ... that, on the basis of the other, I become reconciled with my own othernessforeignness,
    that I play on it and live by it." -Julia Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves

    Yvonne Shaw is an Auckland-based artist who uses photographic portraiture to explore psychological relations between people. Situating models in various urban locations she constructs images that evoke the complex tensions of social encounters. She has an MFA with First Class Honours from Elam School of Fine Arts. Her photographs and photobooks have been exhibited in New Zealand and Australia. In 2018 she was awarded the Second Runnerup Award in the 27th Annual Wallace Art Awards.
    __________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 21 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams (a collaboration)
    Repatriation
    The situation of the artifact and Ngāi Tahu taonga from Te Waipounamu – The South Island, within museums in Aotearoa and abroad is foregrounded in the collaborative project of Māori artist Areta Wilkinson (Ngāi Tahu) and Pākehā artist Mark Adams. A residency at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, UK between 2009-17 allowed the artists to respond to those parts of collections with personal significance housed in English and German imperial museums. The pair produced unique silver bromide photograms of taonga and the tools and materials of their making. For Wilkinson, the project allowed a direct engagement with her whakapapa as a maker, and to produce new works from the absences in these photograms which directly reference the mātauranga Māori of her ancestors. For Adams, the project opened a way of engaging with the colonial relationships these artifacts and taonga are enmeshed in without messing with them. Repatriation return the shades of this cultural material and new manifestations of it to our eyes here.

    Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970. He subsequently became well known for work concerned with cross-cultural interactions around Rotorua, Samoan tatau (tattooing) among the diaspora in New Zealand, the voyages of Captain Cook and other dimensions of colonial history in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific, and in Europe. His work has been exhibited at biennales in Sao Paulo and Johannesburg, and otherwise in countries including Australia, Britain, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

    Areta Wilkinson is an artist of Ngāi Tahu descent, a Māori tribal group of Te Waipounamu the South Island of New Zealand. Wilkinson has investigated the intersection of contemporary jewellery as a form of applied knowledge and practice with Māori philosophies, especially whakapapa (genealogies) and a worldview informed by Ngāi Tahu perspectives. These ideas are articulated in her 2014 PhD Creative Arts with Massey University. Wilkinson’s work is seen in New Zealand public collections and current artworks are exhibited in the 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9) at Queensland Art Gallery Museum of Modern Art (QAGOMA).
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 28 MARCH, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Paul Brobbel
    Pretty good, for the 21st Century
    Len Lye’s claim that his work will be ‘pretty good, for the 21st century’ was a witty but prescient exclamation made in the 1960s at the peak of his career as a kinetic artist. In relation to this notion of the future, curator Paul Brobbel will reflect upon posthumous activities and exhibition making of Lye’s work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. He will introduce the various concepts at play at the Len Lye Centre, looking closely at the unique opportunities and challenges in building an internationally recognised programme around a single artist in provincial Aotearoa.

    Paul Brobbel is Senior Curator and Len Lye Curator at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre. In 2016 he was a Research Fellow at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Paul has worked at museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Auckland Museum and Puke Ariki. He has written extensively on the work of Len Lye including recent publications with the Getty Conservation Institute and Canterbury University Press.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 4 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

     Ed Hanfling
    You Can Never Have Too Much of a Good Thing
    Taking in the First Church and functionalism, fandom and feminism, formalism and fragmentation, and other “f” words, Ed reflects on what he learned from writing a book and curating an exhibition on the art and design of contemporary modernist Roy Good.

    Ed Hanfling is an art historian, critic and curator who teaches art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art. His book Parallel Universe: The Art and Design of Roy Good was published in December 2018, and he curated an exhibition of the same title for Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery and Christchurch’s Centre of Contemporary Art.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    THUR 11 APRIL, 12.00 – 1.00 PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST.

    Susan Best
    Intimacy with Strangers: Nat Randall and Anna Breckon's The Second Woman
    This paper examines one contemporary participatory performance that centres on a romantic couple: a twenty-four hour performance work by Anna Breckon and Nat Randall called The Second Woman (2016). This work uses the serial method established by conceptual art as an impersonal mode to present 100 intimate encounters between Nat Randall and the various men who answered a call out to participate. The work repeats a scene between a woman and her lover where disconnection and repair figure. The men are at once highly individual and yet also interchangeable, disposable and substitutable (like a contemporary Tinder dating app, the men slide past quickly into a blur). Randall has an astonishing capacity to accommodate each man and his approach to the narrative and the performance, I analyse her approach to seriality using the idea of "the law of the mother" developed by British psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell.

    Susan Best is an art historian and occasional curator, specialising in modern and contemporary art. Her books include Visualizing Feeling: Affect and the Feminine Avant-garde (2011) and Reparative Aesthetics: Witnessing in Contemporary Art Photography (2016). Both books won the Australia and New Zealand Art Association best book prize. She is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

     

  • Public Exhibition: Michelle Wilkinson - the sixth (contemporary jewellery and extinction) (February 25 2019)

    11-14 MARCH, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Michelle Wilkinson

    the sixth: contemporary jewellery and extinction

    EXHIBITION DATES: 11 - 14 March, 2019

    EXHIBITION OPENING: Monday 11 March, 5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St) , Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

  • Public Exhibition: Michael Schouten - Society's Dance with Lament (February 25 2019)

    5-7 MARCH, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Michael Schouten

    Society’s Dance With Lament

    EXHIBITION DATES: 5 - 7 March, 2019

    EXHIBITION OPENING; Tuesday March 5th, 5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St) , Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

  • Dunedin School of Art TIMETABLE week 1, 2019 (February 18 2019)

    DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART: BACHELOR OF VISUAL ARTS, GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN VISUAL ARTS, PHOTOGRAPHIC MEDIA ARTS ORIENTATION WEEK 2019

  • Exhibition: Andrea Muggeridge, Muggeridgian Solids (February 18 2019)

    25-28 FEB, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, DUNEDIN

    Andrea Muggeridge

    MUGGERIDGIAN SOLIDS: Colour, Texture, Facets.

    EXHIBITION DATES: 25 - 28 February, 2019

    EXHIBITION CLOSING: Friday March 1st, 5pm – 7pm

    DSA GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St) , Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS: Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

  • Otago Polytechnic Design lecturers’ moth project takes flight (February 14 2019)

    A pair of Otago Polytechnic Design lecturers have received permission from NZ Post to do a second batch of wooden butterflies inspired by a series of iconic New Zealand postage stamps.

    Design lecturer Gavin O’Brien and Hannah Joynt, Lecturer in Art, Digital Media and Design at Otago Polytechnic, have produced a limited run of wooden butterflies inspired by Enid Hunter’s 1970 iconic design of a New Zealand postage stamp featuring a Tussock Butterfly.

    Supported by the copyright owners of the image, New Zealand Post, Gavin and Hannah produced limited run of plywood moths before Christmas “to test the market” with several being as gifted as “koha”.

    Recently, they received permission from NZ Post to do a second, larger batch of around 30, which will be completed later in the year.

    The project mixes cultural history with design research, Product Design pragmatism and artistic flourishes. Made from laser-cut bamboo laminate and utilising a limited palette of sustainable Resene paints, the butterflies are also an exercise in applied research in sustainable design, linked to a community outcome.

    “It is supported by New Zealand Post as – in their words – ‘the official issuing authority of New Zealand stamps celebrating our culture, heritage, arts, stories and people’,” Gavin says. “We see ourselves as ‘pracademics’.”

    “As a young stamp collector in the 1960s and early ‘70s, I was always taken by the highly stylised design,” Gavin reflects.

    The project also aims to raise funds for Landcare Research’s Ahi Pepe/MothNet project.

    “We are donating 10% of sales to Ahi Pepe/Moth Net, a citizen science project that aims to enthuse students and their whanau about the natural world.”

    Gavin and Hannah are hoping to present their work at a research symposium to be held at Eastern Institute of Technology – Te Aho a Māu in April.

    The theme of the symposium is community-centred research, demonstrating the key role that New Zealand’s institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) play in ensuring that research has a tangible impact and benefits our communities.

    Gavin says other designs could well take flight, too.

    “As well as the Tussock Butterfly, Enid Hunter’s stamp designs of 1970-1971 featured the Red Admiral Butterfly and the Glade Copper Butterfly, so watch this space.”

     

     

     

  • Exhibition: Antonia Boyle, Bloom (February 12 2019)

    15-26 FEB, ROBERT PIGGOT GALLERY, 8 JETTY ST, DUNEDIN

    BLOOM

    Antonia Boyle

    Exhibition dates: 15-26 February

    Exhibition opening: 15 February, 5.30-7PM

    Exhibition Hours: Monday/Tuesday 12 - 2 PM, Saturday/Sunday 10AM-4PM

    Bloom is the culmination of jewellery work by Master of Fine Arts Student Antonia Boyle. Bloom explores the human life cycle through jewellery that is "grown" from human teeth. The theory behind the work is that loss feeds growth, without loss there is no growth therefore inspiring us to look at times of loss as an opportunity for growth. The Jewellery pieces are available to be tried on and you are encouraged to experience the pieces for yourself.

     

  • Exhibition: BLACK+WHITE (February 12 2019)

    18 FEB - 29 MARCH, THE PRINT LAB, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, REIGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    BLACK+WHITE

    Curated by Bon a Tirer (BAT)

    Exhibition dates: 18 Feb - 29 March

    Exhibition Opening – Thursday 21 February - 12 to 1.30 pm

     

    Featuring the work of:

    David Richardson

    Greg Thomas

    Scott Redford

    Felix Gonzalez-Torres

    Ruth Johnstone

    Kate Lohse

    Olivia Trainor

    Vernon Ah Kee

    Neil Emmerson

    Jeff Gibson

    Marion Wassenaar

    Hayden Burke

    Virginia Watson

    Karol Wilczynska

    Noel Counihan

    Rory Allardice

    BAT & Emboss

    Nathan Forbes

  • Former refugees to graduate from Youth Summer Programme (February 7 2019)

    A cohort of 20 young people with refugee backgrounds will graduate from an innovative Otago Polytechnic programme on Monday 11 February. 

    The Former Refugee Youth Summer Programme, which is now in its third iteration, puts 20 young people (aged 16-21) through a summer programme that includes:

    • Studying towards their learner car licenses
    • Volunteering
    • Sport and fitness
    • English language
    • Future planning

    The free programme is funded by Otago Polytechnic and Otago Community Trust, and involves partnerships with the Red Cross and Ministry of Education.

    “We enable the learners to sit their licence tests with an interpreter, and we organise volunteer and orientation towards work opportunities for them. It’s a recognisably impactful programme,” says Aaron Blaker, Team Leader of Otago Polytechnic’s English Language Centre.

    “In 2015, when it became apparent that there was a need for New Zealand to respond to the refugee crisis in Syria, Otago Polytechnic joined forces with other stakeholders and put in a proposal for Dunedin to become a refugee resettlement centre.”

    The proposal was successful, and Otago Polytechnic soon had students with refugee backgrounds enrolling to learn English. As time has gone on, former refugee learners have also entered Otago Polytechnic programmes such as IT and engineering.

    Aaron hopes Otago Polytechnic will become a model for former refugee education nationally. He already has plans to help ease the transition for older students, who often have high-level experience in vocational fields but no evidence of their qualifications.

    “The refugee background students don’t see themselves as victims – they’re very resilient and keen to get moving after many years of being in limbo.

    “For many of the women, this may be the first time they’ve been able to participate in public education. They are just flying, and it’s quite a buzz.”

    Equally importantly, the students contribute greatly to the cultural engagement and vibrancy of Otago Polytechnic.

    “We have cultural and communication exchanges, mentorships and projects with students from a wide variety of programmes – including Social Services, Occupational Therapy, Counselling and Design,” Aaron says.

    “We also run Cultural Diversity workshops with several short-course groups.

    “Many New Zealanders have not had direct contact with people from such a different life and cultural background.

    “Our domestic students – and international visitors – learn and grow through such experiences and interaction.”

    Read more about our International programmes

  • Surge in demand for Otago Polytechnic’s degree-level programmes (February 4 2019)

    Demand for Otago Polytechnic’s degree-level programmes in 2019 has risen significantly.

    Applications for Bachelor programmes in 2019 are up by more than 18% compared to the same time last year, while overall applications at Otago Polytechnic are up by 3%.

    The budget for 2019 is for total enrolments to increase by 2.4% over the 2018 actuals.  Domestic enrolments are budgeted to increase by 4%, and more than 10% over the previous two years.

    International enrolments are budgeted at more than 1400, in line with targets and a 12% rise since 2017.

    “It is pleasing to note the increasing trend of applications in multi-year programmes as opposed to short duration programmes,” Phil Ker, Chief Executive Otago Polytechnic, says.

    “The number of students reflects the attractiveness of our programmes, the quality of our teaching and our innovative approaches to learning.

    “Otago Polytechnic’s varied programmes help to address some marked skills shortages, not only in Dunedin and Otago, but throughout New Zealand. 

    “Our achievements in the face of declining sector enrolments reflect our success in servicing not only school leavers but experienced adults in the workplace.”

    Otago Polytechnic is also in a strong financial position, again bucking sector trends.

    “Our 2018 Otago Polytechnic group unaudited surplus is expected to be ahead of budget and forecast with a draft unaudited result of 4%.

    “We are currently finalising the financial statements. The strong surplus is related to good growth in domestic and international EFTS along with returns from our revenue diversification projects.

    “The financial result from the first year of operation of Te Pā Tauira (the Otago Polytechnic Student Village) was very good, with high occupancy and favourable cost variances. 

    “This is a strong result given the challenges of the ITP sector,” Phil says.

    Otago Polytechnic continues to innovate, including its ever-growing suite of EduBits microcredentials, and its suite of brewing qualifications, which have been crafted around its commercial Rough Rock Brewery, which was officially opened in Bannockburn in December.

    Jo Brady, Otago Polytechnic Deputy Chief Executive, describes the brewery as a “flipped” model: “It’s a fully commercial brewery that supports our new suite of brewing programmes, which begin in mid-February.

    “This makes it distinctly different from a traditional approach and means learners gain experience in a commercial operation,” Jo says.

    The purpose-built brewery is part of a $3 million redevelopment of Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus Bannockburn site, including a new trades block that also houses carpentry and automotive facilities.

    A strong, high-performing and resilient organisation, Otago Polytechnic provides “tremendous benefits” for Dunedin and Otago, including contributing more than $300 million a year to the Otago economy, according to a recent Economic Impact Report.

    “We contribute to our communities in other ways, too – through student projects, sponsorships, and making our resources, including buildings and equipment, freely available,” Phil says.

    “Recently, we became the first organisation in New Zealand to win the Baldrige-affiliated Performance Excellence Study Award (PESA), a prestigious organisational excellence award.”

  • Exhibition celebrates latest phase of Art on Campus project (February 11 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic is set to stage an art exhibition showcasing the latest phase of its Art on Campus project.

    Opening on 13 February, Now See Here! features works by Dunedin School of Art honours student Jenny Hjertquist, whose Four Rivers (2019, concrete and mixed media) is the inaugural commission for Otago Polytechnic’s “Four Plinths” project.

    Rebecca Hamid, convenor of the Otago Polytechnic Art on Campus Steering Group, says Art on Campus aims to enhance Otago Polytechnic’s cultural presence in Dunedin and continues to build the strong reputation of the Dunedin School of Art.

    Sited in the courtyard at the rear of the Hub, “Four Plinths” will feature revolving exhibits of student and staff sculpture projects.

    “Concrete tablets will sit upon two of the plinths,” Jenny Hjertquist explains.

    “These will have small sculptural engraved landscapes and scenes, i.e. ocean waves, mountains, human interaction, rituals in everyday life.

    “The other two plinths will have two mythological-inspired dogs with three faces, which will act as protectors or watchers.”

    Now See Here! also features works by Tori Clearwater and Liam Hoffman who, along with Jenny, are either finalists or recipients of the Wallace Warburton Scholarship, an annual scholarship awarded to the most promising Dunedin School of Art graduate for that year.

    Significantly, the exhibition includes sculptures by Dunedin School of Art Senior Lecturer Scott Eady who, along with Rebecca Hamid, has been instrumental in establishing the Wallace Warburton Scholarship.

    Arts patrons Sir James Wallace and Jan Warburton’s generous support includes a solo exhibition at the Pah Homestead in Auckland, contributions towards materials, production costs, freight and travel, an exhibition opening and publicity, as well as the exhibition space for 6-8 weeks.

    The scholarship was created to promote graduates who are embarking on a career as a professional artist and, consequentially, need an introduction to the Auckland art market. An exhibition at the Pah Homestead brings with it an opportunity to meet dealer gallery professionals and potentially being represented by a commercial gallery.

    “It is really important that we somehow provide our graduating students with opportunities for exposure in Auckland. This is one reason Rebecca Hamid and I worked hard to establish the Wallace Warburton Scholarship,” Scott Eady says.

    “Sir James Wallace and Jan Warburton’s generosity is providing a foot-in-the-door for a fortunate few graduating students from the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic.”

    Scott’s work is featured in the Wallace collection at the Pah Homestead, and Jan Warburton also has a large collection of works by Scott.

    Otago Polytechnic’s Art on Campus plan includes the installation last year of celebrated New Zealand artist Michel Tuffery’s Nga Kete sculpture at the Forth St entrance of Otago Polytechnic.

    Now See Here! officially opens at Otago Polytechnic on Wednesday 13 February at 5.45pm.

  • (January 29 2019)

    What’s in your future for 2019?

    Got some news you want to share? Our External Relations, Marketing and Communications team can help. We’re always keen to spread the word about students, staff and all our successes. So come and chat to us at the All Staff Day Service Expo, and tell us what’s in your future for 2019.

    Marketing sometimes has a reputation for ‘spin’ – but when it comes communications and marketing at OP, the figures speak for themselves.

    Our vital statistics from 2018 include:
    • 6,130,659 views of the OP website
    • 3000 page website maintained
    • 1525 news stories and notices published across Tūhono and the OP website
    • 500+ digital screens created
    • 400+ graphic design jobs completed
    • 120 Facebook updates posted
    • 100+ media releases sent
    • 50+ student profiles written
    • 40 new programme information sheets created

    That’s a lot of quantity, but our real focus is on quality:
    • Our Facebook page is regularly ranked the best tertiary page in NZ for engagement
    • Tūhono was showcased at the Tertiary ICT conference
    • Our design team includes award-winning artists and professional illustrators
    • Our media team includes award-winning journalists
    • Our communications team includes professional authors

    We’re here to help you with all of your external relations, communications and marketing needs – from building relationships with community groups, to designing collateral, to creating and booking cinema ads.


    Meet the team

      Name        
    Karen Spreckley Karen Spreckley I provide admin support.       
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               

     

    Karen Spreckley
    Business Support Administrator
    What I do: I provide admin support.
    Contact me: When you’re not sure who else to contact – I’ll point you in the right direction.
    About me: I like to run up hills.

    Mike Waddell
    Director External Relations Communications and Marketing.
    What I do: I lead the External Relations, Communications and Marketing team.
    Contact me: For strategic marketing and communications advice. I also help manage urgent media requests and critical incidents.
    About me: I’m an OP grad … and I once forgot to bring my shoes to work.
    Read OPeople to learn more about Mike.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2750

    Katie Duncan
    Senior Marketing Management Advisor and Creative Content Lead
    What I do: I am responsible for developing and implementing marketing campaigns, managing the production of marketing collateral and providing leadership in creative content for advertising.
    Contact me: When you need marketing and advertising advice.
    About me: I have met two members of Guns N’ Roses.

    Katie Wise
    Senior Web UX Lead
    What I do: I am responsible for the high-level coordination of content, tone and engagement across the Otago Polytechnic website to ensure a positive online user experience. I currently have a lead role in the Web UX Project.
    Contact me: For advice about new website sections, refreshing large areas of existing website content, website analytics or reports, and general website queries.
    About me: I was in the first Harry Potter movie.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Katie.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2653

    Shane Gilchrist
    Communication and Engagement Advisor
    What I do: I plan, write and manage material for media, social media, online content, advertising and print publications.
    Contact me: For media liaison when you have something you want publicised.
    About me: I’m a musician … with the requisite leather jacket collection.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Shane.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2836

    Emma Wood
    Senior Communication and Engagement Advisor
    What I do: I am responsible for writing and editing corporate publications such as the Annual Report. I provide social media content, writing support and media liaison cover.
    Contact me: For writing, creative and social media support.
    About me: I once won a charity blackjack tournament.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Emma.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2294

    Kathryn van Beek
    Internal Communications
    What I do: I am responsible for internal communications to staff.
    Contact me: When you would like your message to reach staff, e.g. via Leading News or Tūhono.
    About me: I’m attempting to grow sweetcorn.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Kathryn.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2769

    Katie Scott
    Web Content Specialist
    What I do: I create and edit content on the website.
    Contact me: If you would like to buy me coffee.
    About me: Gary Oldman touched my hand.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Katie.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/3091

    Jodie Gibson
    Digital Media Producer
    What I do: I am responsible for OP’s social media, photography and videography.
    Contact me: To discuss your photography and videography needs.
    About me: I also do freelance work – contact me if you need a photographer.

    Suzanne Thornton
    Graphic Designer: Publications Specialist
    What I do: I design publications such as the Programme Guide and Māori Annual Report, advertisements (from colourful full-page ODT layouts to tiny black and white Star items) and have design oversight of corporate stationery and graduation certificates.
    Contact me: Through Service.
    About me: I am restoring my Ravensbourne farmlet back to native bush.

    Siau-jiun Lim
    Graphic Designer
    What I do: I’m primarily responsible for website UX/UI design, including the OP websites, Tūhono, EduBits, Symposium web set up, EDM (newsletters) and UI supports for all services areas. Suzanne and I have oversight of the OP brand.
    Contact me: Through Service.
    About me: I’m doing Honours at the Dunedin School of Art.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Jiun.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/2687

    Sam Hendry
    Graphic Designer
    What I do: I’m responsible for managing the digital signage on campus. I create digital and print design, animations and branding.
    Contact me: Through Service.
    About me: I’m illustrating a children’s book in my spare time.
    Learn more about Sam on Tūhono.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/3342

    Rachael Shriffer
    Senior Learner Engagement Advisor
    What I do: I work on a number of engagement projects, including corporate, sponsorship and learner centric events and the current Learner Journey.
    Contact me: For learner engagement advice.
    About me: I’ve met the Queen of England. Twice.

    Rebecca Williams
    Community Engagement Facilitator
    What I do: In addition to my Te Punaka Ōwheo role, I am Otago Polytechnic’s Community Engagement Facilitator (.5 FTE). The purpose of this role is to grow relationships with key community groups.
    Contact me: To discuss your school’s relationships with wider communities, or to learn more about the Pasifika Strategic Framework.
    About me: I am a keen card maker!
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Rebecca.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/3370

    Jonathan Duncan
    Development Officer
    What I do: I ensure the smooth running of the Education Foundation.
    Contact me: If you have fundraising or business partnership ideas.
    About me: I’m also the Chair of the Dunedin Swimming Board.
    Read ‘five questions with’ to learn more about Jonathan.
    https://www.op.ac.nz/hub/news/item/3167

    John Findlay
    Advisor
    What I do: I also work for the Capable NZ and Global Engagement teams.
    About me: I have an enviable shoe collection.

    Andrea Hessian
    Executive Administrator
    What I do: I provide support across the People, Performance and Development directorate.
    Contact me: If you need to get in touch with Jo Brady or Mike Waddell.
    About me: I am currently studying towards my Masters of Professional Practice.


    Get in touch

    So tell us what’s in your future for 2019 – and we’ll share the news with learners, staff and the wider community.

    You can get in touch with us by emailing communications@op.ac.nz, by opening a Service Case, or by contacting us directly.

     

  • Fashion graduates selected for iD Emerging Designer Awards (January 28 2019)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduates Phoebe Lee and Rosette Hailes-Paku have been selected for the iD International Emerging Designer Awards in Dunedin in March.

    The pair, who graduated at the end of 2018, are among 37 talented designers who will show their collections at the awards, which will held at the Regent Theatre on 15-16 March as part of iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

    Phoebe and Rosette are both “surprised and delighted” at their selection.

    “I have always been inspired by the designers at the ID Emerging Designer Awards,” Phoebe says. “I always dreamt of being ‘that person’ who got to show their outfits.”

    Rosette: “My lecturers encouraged me to enter, so I’m stoked.”

    Supported by Otago Polytechnic, the iD International Emerging Designer Awards is Australasia’s only international young designer competition.

    Dr Margo Barton, Otago Polytechnic Professor of Fashion and iD Dunedin Fashion Creative Director, says designers from the top fashion schools around the world are eager to visit Dunedin to network and launch their collections before an international audience.

    Each emerging designer will show five garments, which will be assessed by a panel of all-star Kiwi fashion designers. The judges are designers Tanya Carlson, Benny Castles (WORLD), Margi Robertson (NOM*d) and Kate Sylvester, as well as VIVA editor Amanda Linnell.

    The iD International Emerging Designers will show at both nights of the iD Dunedin Fashion Show. Winners of the iD International Emerging Designer Awards will be announced during the Friday show and all the finalists’ collections and the winners’ announcement will be repeated on Saturday.

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

  • Masters Graduate accepted for International Residency in Austria (January 22 2019)

    Congratulations to Arati Kushwaha, who has been accepted as the 2019 Artist in Residence, with KulturKontakt Austria, from 800 international applicants.

    This 3 month residency is offered by the Austrian Federal Chancellery in cooperation with KulturKontakt Austria.The residency is designed to offer an opportunity to familiarise the Artist in Residence with the Austrian art scene and cultural environment and to make contact with Austrian artists. During their stay in Salzburg, the artists in residence will be taken care of by Kunstverein Salzburg and studio provided.

    Arati graduated with Masters from the Dunedin School of Art, in 2018, and will undertake to make a work during her residency, continuing her work on gender equity and education.

  • Graduate to take up residency at Montana University (January 17 2019)

     Dunedin potter Marion Familton, a graduate in fine art from the Dunedin School of Art, will take up a month long residency at Montana University.

     

    Home Search form Subscribe Send us news & photos News Sport Life & Style Entertainment Business Regions Features Drivesouth Rural life Skip to main content Subscribe Log in /Register Wednesday, 16 January 2019 Ocean-crossing chicken one of a kind By John Gibb 4 0 News Dunedin Dunedin potter Marion Familton, with her ceramic chicken. Photo: Peter McIntosh Dunedin potter Marion Familton, with her ceramic chicken. Photo: Peter McIntosh This is a story about a rather large chicken, a Dunedin potter and opportunities in the United States. The 32cm high chicken first appeared when Marion Familton attended a week-long workshop last June in Helena, Montana. The participants - at the Archie Bray Centre for the Ceramic Arts, ''one of the leading centres for the ceramic arts in the USA'' - were asked to produce a chicken-inspired piece. Familton's tan ''giant chicken'' was by far the biggest. It probably helped that Familton was originally a sculptor. ''I'm a shape-maker,'' she says. But then carrying the ''quite heavy'' ceramic chicken proved ''the killer'' on the eight connecting flights back to New Zealand, via Canada. Well-packed in a carry-on bag, the bird survived , and ''people love it''. Some people said she had been ''mad to travel with it'', but it had been ''hilarious'' getting through security. As her bag went through the scanner there was often a ''double take'' from security officers: some were amused, others stony-faced. It was at the workshop Familton also met leading utilitarian potter, Prof Julia Galloway. Galloway invited her to take up a month-long residency at her university, the University of Montana, about 180km away, in Missoula. Familton, a graduate in fine art at the Dunedin School of Art, will stretch her wings to travel back to Montana in March. She has had her work displayed at the Stuart Street Potters Co-operative for more than 10 years, and the residency would help ''elaborate my ideas more fully''. She was likely to continue making small lidded containers- but ''no giant chickens''. 4 0 Comment now Related Stories Emergency services assess the scene of a gas cylinder explosion which killed a crew member on... Dunedin cruise death prompts global warning fleetwoodmac.jpg Fleetwoood Mac coming back to Dunedin David Clark Health minister silent over DHBs' highest pay packets Russian adventurer Fedor Konyukhov is more than a third of the way through his rowing journey to... 'Groundhog Day' for adventurer Add a Comment Login or register to post comments. Connect with us Facebook Twitter Email Most Popular Do not judge crash victims, father says Fleetwoood Mac coming back to Dunedin Tech company founder abandons suppression bid Baby's blister burns blamed on Cancer Society sunscreen Drain on bus hub budget Unruly tourists: Boy pulls the finger as locals lash out Editors' Picks Madam Woo restaurant in Stuart St, Dunedin. Photo: Peter McIntosh Chef difficulties behind closure All Blacks Anton Lienert-Brown (left) and Sam Cane watch the Blair Vining Bucket List match from... 'Bucket list' match and auction bring in $100K Dunedin writer and pedestrian safety advocate Dr Lynley Hood believes e-scooters should not be... Get scooters off footpaths - taxi firms $4.7m on Dunedin cycleways Home Contact Us Contribute Facebook Subscribe Home Delivery ODT Subscriptions FAQs Stops, Starts & Redirects Contact Contact us Site feedback Send us your news About us Our Websites Channel 39 - Southern TV Post a Note Newspapers Otago Daily Times digital edition and archive Oamaru Mail The Star - Dunedin The News - Central Otago The Ensign - Gore Ashburton Courier North Canterbury News Southland Express - Invercargill Southern Rural Life Central Rural Life The Courier - Timaru Mountain Scene - Queenstown Property Times South Canterbury Extra! School Publication Classifieds Death notices Drive South Jobs Classified Advertising Advertise Upload print advertising Advertising Terms Advertise with us Services ODT Shop Otago Images Corporate Logos ODT Print Ad Features Dunedin Guide © Copyright Allied Press Limited 2019. All rights reserved. Home Search form
  • Drawing from Life (January 17 2019)

    Life Drawing Drawing is a fundamental skill for all artists which expands their perception and ability to express that perception through drawing. It is also one of art's more difficult disciplines. Once you can draw the human figure, you can draw anything. The human figure is the most complex natural form and it provides us with the ultimate concentration of feeling and form. Even abstract representation of the human form cannot be done without knowing the fundamentals.

    "The classic example everyone uses, Picasso, the founder of abstraction art in many ways, was an incredibly good draughtsman." says Steev Peyroux, "It's that classic thing; you've got to know the rules to break them."

    People's observation was how they interpreted the world.

    "Drawing is representing that. "And the thing about drawing the human form is we're drawing our own selves in many ways."

    Some of the traps students fell into were getting "zoomed in" to a body part, working in high detail on a shoulder, for instance.

    "They'll get round to the rest of the body and the shoulder will be way too small."

    Another was "drawing what you think you know. We look at humans every day and think you know them."

    Life Drawing tutor Madison Kelly said some classes were for beginners, but some are for the more experienced.

    Read more of interview in the Otago Daily Times

    > Life Drawing classes at Dunedin School of Art 2019

    (image: Madison Kelly, Life Drawing tutor in her studio, 2016)

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Flexible Learning) (January 14 2019)

    We are now calling for papers for Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Flexible Learning) 4.

    The theme for this issue is Change Strategies, exploring the ways in which change is proposed, achieved, negotiated, and experienced by businesses, communities and individuals. Scope is a peer-reviewed open access journal available online here.

    We welcome contributions in a variety of formats, including articles, essays, case studies, logs and reports, conceptual papers, and reviews. Other suggested formats will also be considered. The maximum word limit for a feature article is 4000 words (less for other formats). The deadline for papers is 31 May 2019. Your submission should include a title, author names and a 300 word abstract.

    Please also include a short biography of each author, including institutional position and affiliation (where relevant); and contact information (postal, email and telephone number). Please provide this information on a separate sheet from the abstract for blind review purposes.

    Please send submissions to the editor via email

    Dr Lesley Gill
    Editor, Scope (Flexible Learning) 4

  • Lecturers' Design project takes flight (December 26 2018)

    A pair of Otago Polytechnic lecturers have given wings to a project that mixes cultural history, artistic flourishes and design nous.

    Inspired by a series of iconic New Zealand postage stamps depicting New Zealand moths, Design lecturer Gavin O’Brien embarked on an applied design research project that has culminated in reproducing Enid Hunter’s 1970 design of a Tussock Butterfly.

    He and Hannah Joynt, Lecturer in Art, Digital Media and Design at Otago Polytechnic, have produced a limited run of laser-cut wooden butterflies utilising a palette of Resene colours.

    Supported by the copyright owners of the image, New Zealand Post, the project also aims to raise funds for Landcare Research’s Ahi Pepe/MothNet project.

    “As a young stamp collector in the 1960s and early ‘70s, I was always taken by the highly stylised design,” Gavin reflects.

    “We have produced a limited run of wooden moths to test the market. If successful, we might follow this up with a larger run, although that would depend on permission from NZ Post.”

    Read more about our Design programmes

  • Otago Polytechnic Cookery students in shipshape (December 19 2018)

    Students from Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus recently spent four days in Dusky Sound, where they fished and foraged for Fiordland delicacies as part of a collaboration with Pure Salt and celebrity chef Michael Van Elzen.

    The educational adventure, from 11-14 December, involved a former New Zealand Navy vessel renamed Flightless, which was operated by tourism venture Pure Salt.

    Under the guidance of television personality and renowned chef Michael Van Elzen, the students created a range of dishes for four paying guests as they cruised through Fiordland.

    During their voyage of discovery, the students not only experienced remote wilderness, but also learnt about environmental pressures and unsustainable fishing practices.

    Otago Polytechnic’s Central Campus aims to inspire students to think differently, focus on what is around them and recognise that our region offers extraordinary career opportunities.

     “We teach our students how to diversify what they cook to ease the burden on dwindling species and to respect our fabulous resources,” says Chris Smith, Senior Lecturer in Cookery and Culinary Arts at Otago Polytechnic.

    “Highlights of the trip included students becoming crew members and catering in a high-end commercial environment. Some of the students were internationals, highlighting our innovative approach to tertiary education.

    “Experiences such as this show how we can prepare our cookery students for careers that enable them to showcase New Zealand’s uniqueness.”

    Read more about our Cookery programmes

    Check out the video >

  • TV series focuses on Wildlife Hospital (December 19 2018)

    Award-winning company Natural History New Zealand is set to produce a television series focusing on all the great work that goes on at the Wildlife Hospital Dunedin.

    Titled Wildlife Rescue, the documentary series will comprise five 45-minute programmes, which will be screened on Choice TV once production finishes in 2019.

    The Wildlife Hospital, which opened in January 2018, receives financial and other support from Otago Polytechnic. Significantly, the hospital operates out of Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing.

    Wildlife Rescue follows the dedicated veterinary team, who help safeguard New Zealand’s native species through rescue, rehabilitation and research.

    “This is fantastic news for all concerned,” says Phil Ker, Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive.

    “This is another example of why our decision to accommodate the Wildlife Hospital at the School of Veterinary Nursing was a good one; we are confident of solid academic and research gains, in addition to the already very clear community and biodiversity benefits. Otago Polytechnic intends to work hard to make the most of this opportunity.”

    Wildlife Rescue will provide the audience with a rare window into what it takes to save a wild life, from the smallest penguin to the largest sea lion, or the rare takahē to the common tui.

    NHNZ Managing Director Kyle Murdoch: “Wildlife Rescue is such an important story for NHNZ to tell; NHNZ began telling stories about the plight of our local wildlife over 40 years ago, but creating and sharing content that can make a difference is even more important today than ever before.”

    Wildlife Hospital Trust Chair Steve Walker: “This is, of course, excellent news. While the Wildlife Hospital will be at the centre of the documentary series, it will also be an opportunity to highlight the efforts of so many people throughout the Otago/Southland region who are helping to recover, treat and rehabilitate our native animals.

    “The captivating stories that we have to tell have attracted interest from TV companies across the globe. However, we have remained loyal to Dunedin-based NHNZ, so we couldn’t be more delighted that they will be producing the documentary series as it’s been a genuine pleasure to deal with them during the past 20 months.”

  • Otago Polytechnic appoints brewing rock stars (December 18 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has appointed two highly experienced and talented brewers to help drive its exciting new Central Otago beer brewing facility – Rough Rock Brewing Co.

    Ben Middlemiss has taken up the role of Brewery Operations Manager, while Geoff Collie has been appointed Brewing Programmes Leader.

    Born and raised in the South Island, Ben has more than 50 years' experience in brewing and won more than 60 national and International awards.

    He has been instrumental in craft brewing in New Zealand and beyond, and is the founding brewer of the Cock and Bull chain of pubs as well as Steam Brewing Company.

    “It’s a great time to be in the industry. The beer culture in New Zealand is vibrant and thriving. We are evolving into a culture that really embraces quality food and beverages.

    “I’m thrilled to be able to share my skills and experience.”

    As Brewing Programmes Leader, Geoff Collie also sees his new role as a “great opportunity” to pass on his knowledge to a new generation of brewers.

    “I have been involved in brewing operations management for 27 years, and brewery design projects for the last six,” says Geoff, who graduated from university with a chemistry degree, before getting a job as a trainee brewer at Speight's Brewery.

    “I left the brewing industry in 2000 and completed a pharmacy degree, then returned to brewing at Canterbury for eight years until the 2011 earthquakes closed the site,” Geoff explains.

    “I then worked as Project Brewer for the Speight's Brewery rebuild in 2011, and then with Emerson's for their rebuild in 2014. I have worked on a couple of smaller breweries and a distillery since then.”

    Beginning in February 2019, Otago Polytechnic’s brewing qualifications have been crafted to meet industry needs as well as offer a learning experience that fits with learners’ lifestyles.

    Jo Brady, Otago Polytechnic Deputy Chief Executive, says the Bannockburn brewery is a “flipped” model – it’s a fully commercial brewery that will support our new suite of brewing programmes. This makes it distinctly different from a traditional approach, which would have brewing programmes supported with a training brewery.

    The New Zealand Certificate in Brewing (Level 4), a full-time one-year programme, has been designed for those with a passion for brewing who want to get into the industry, or are seeking to enhance their knowledge and skills.

    Learners can build on those skills via the six-month Level 5 New Zealand Certificate in Brewing, and a one-year New Zealand Diploma in Brewing (Level 6), both of which will suit those already working in the industry.

    The Level 5 and Level 6 programmes will initially be offered via Capable NZ, Otago Polytechnic’s centre for work-based learning. From 2020, the programmes will comprise a mix of on-site and distance learning.

    “We are looking to strengthen our position in Central Otago, and to do this we need to find niche programmes that can attract students from across the country,” Phil Ker, Chief Executive, Otago Polytechnic, says.

     “We are positioning our Central Campus in part as a centre for food and beverage in the heart of New Zealand’s premier tourism region. This opens up opportunities for edu-tourism. We have several ideas in the pipeline, such as matching beer with food created from local produce.”

    The purpose-built brewery is part of a $3 million redevelopment of Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus Bannockburn site, including a new trades block that will also house carpentry and automotive facilities.

    An official opening and open day was held on December 1. Students will start using the new facilities in early 2019.

    Read about our Brewing programme

    Caption: Ben Middlemiss (left), Brewery Operations Manager; Jo Brady, Otago Polytechnic Deputy Chief Executive and project sponsor; and Andrew Larson, brewing consultant and member of Otago Polytechnic's brewing steering group, celebrate the official opening of Rough Rock Brewing Co. recently.

     

     

     

     

  • Call for papers - Scope Learning and Teaching 2019 (December 14 2018)

    Scope Contemporary Research Topics (Learning and Teaching) is an open access, peer reviewed journal published annually by Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

    Scope (Learning and Teaching) is concerned with views, critical debate and reflections on learning and teaching theory and practice. It seeks to address current topical matters in the field of tertiary education. Its focus is on building a sense of community amongst researchers from an array of New Zealand institutions with the goal of linking with a wider international community. 

    The 2019 issue will focus on the theme of Credentials: people, product, process. We are particularly interested in pieces which deal to the challenges, concepts and critical thinking around programmes, people and curriculum that inform contemporary understandings of credentials.

    Submissions for Scope (Learning and Teaching) are invited from peers and colleagues involved in any aspect of learning and teaching around the globe. Submissions should be sent in electronic format for review and potential inclusion to the Editors: Oonagh McGirr and David McMaster c/o Su Bolland, Editorial Assistant, by 30 June 2019.

    Submissions should contribute to critical debate and reflect new understandings within the context of learning and teaching. High standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to consistency through the APA (6th Edition) referencing style are expected.

    Submission guidelines

    • Send a digital Word document to Su Bolland by 30 June 2019
    • Please clearly name files with the title of the submitted piece and the lead author's name
    • Please supply contact information on a separate cover page to include: Name of author(s); contact email; contact telephone number; postal address; word count; number of images included in text.
    • Author biography: Include a short biography of no more than 50 words of each author with your submission, briefly outlining their professional background and experience.
    • Peer review: Peer review forms will be sent to all submitters in due course, with details concerning the possible reworking of documents where relevant. All submitters will be allowed up to two subsequent resubmissions of documents for peer approval. All final decisions concerning publication of submissions will reside with the Editors

    Formats include: editorials; articles; essays; logs and travel reports; book and educational software reviews; residencies; publications; interviews and roundtables; and reflective pieces. Other suggested formats will also be considered; and special topics comprising submissions by various contributors may be tendered to the editors.

    Word limit:

    • Feature articles and essays: 2500-4000 words
    • Logs and travel reports; residencies; publications; interviews and roundtables; and reflective pieces: 1500-2000 words
    • Book and educational software reviews: 200-700 words

    Text

    • Single line spacing.
    • Please do not apply indentations, tabulations or any such formatting to text.
    • Referencing should be in the form APA (6th Edition) referencing style.
    • All abbreviations must be spelled out upon first mention in both the summary and main text, followed by the abbreviated form in parentheses. Thereafter, you may use the abbreviated form.
    • All funding sources should be credited in an Acknowledgments section. In addition, people who contributed to the work but who do not fit the criteria for authors should be listed along with their contributions.

    Images

    • Low resolution images with full captions should be inserted into the text to indicate where they would be preferred with full captions underneath them. High resolution images should be sent separately.
    • Captions for images should be numbered, should be complete, and should adhere to a sequence of information. See examples at www.thescopes.org
    • Specifications for high resolution images:
      • Format:  Images must be supplied as jpeg (minimum size 2MB)
      • Colour:   Greyscale or CMYK
      • Quality:  300dpi - maximum image print area is 140mm wide x 190 deep.
      • Orientation: Ensure your image is oriented correctly.
      • Labelling: Label all image files with your name and number the images in the order they appear in your text and caption document, e.g. “smith.1.tif”, “smith.2.tif”.

     

  • Indian, NZ students and teachers explore range of water issues (December 13 2018)

    A group of Indian students and teachers and their Kiwi counterparts are this week immersing themselves in a range of water-related issues in Central Otago as part of a global leadership and sustainability initiative.

    Otago Polytechnic is proud to be involved in the Untouched World Foundation’s Waterwise Leadership and Global Citizenship Programme, an intensive, week-long programme that features an “intergenerational korero” at its Cromwell Campus on Friday 14 December.

    Students and teachers predominantly from Otago secondary schools and tertiary institutions have been joined by students and representatives from the Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development (MGIEP) and partners of its YESPeace Youth Network in Asia.

    This week’s activities include visits to lakes and rivers, vineyards and orchards, as well as discussions with water and land use experts, insights into tourism and irrigation pressures, and interviews with locals.

    The collaborative programme aims to establish a New Zealand-India youth leadership exchange programme with a focus on fostering youth leadership, which is a key aspect of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Global Action Programme.

    “Otago Polytechnic believes educating youth on key issues facing society, unlocking their unique leadership potential and inspiring them to become active change-makers is vital,” says Marc Doesburg, Director: Globalisation, Otago Polytechnic.

    “Initiatives such as this Leadership and Global Citizenship Programme positively impact on our world.”

    Other key partners include Otago Regional Council, Otago Community Trust and Contact Energy, with further support from Education New Zealand, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Ngai Tahu.

    “We want the next generation to have the knowledge and capabilities to live, work and learn globally,” says John Goulter, Education New Zealand General Manager Stakeholders and Communications.

    “Helping young people develop into global citizens is a focus of the cross-government International Education Strategy launched in August of this year, and initiatives like this are an excellent example of how we can support this goal. We look forward to seeing how those involved apply what they learn – we’ll be following their progress.”

    Untouched World’s Waterwise programme enables youth to interact with all players in the water resource chain, from primary energy players, through to farming, recreation, cultural and conservation interests, all of whom are involved in sustainable water management.

    “Leadership with young (18-28) is firstly about agency – understanding the many facets of the issue, developing the transferable skills to collaborate with others, act responsibly and then finding a clear path to actively and positively model their own views and behaviour – which are often challenging to those of us a generation removed. But it is vital we all, listen and engage with an international perspective on these issues,” say Mark Prain, Executive Director, and Barry Law, Education Director UWF.

    Deepika Joon, Youth Mobilizing Specialist, UNESCO Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development (MGIEP):

    “It is important for youth to develop social and emotional skills to achieve and understand the multicultural context of realities of water use in New Zealand and India.

    This week’s activities are just one in a range of ongoing initiatives.

    An “Acts of Kindness’” Campaign is also being developed and will involve MGIEP and Untouched World Foundation mobilising youth in partner institutions to foster meaningful exchange of ideas, knowledge and action towards the achievement of UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goals.

    “This understanding, combined with action, will help achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation), SDG 4.7(Global Citizenship and Education for Sustainable Development), and SDG 14 (Life Under Water),” says Deepika.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Otago Polytechnic celebrates record number of graduates (December 13 2018)

    A record 1580 people will graduate from Otago Polytechnic on Friday 14 December.

    This includes 740 people graduating in person, up from 644 last year.

    The overall graduation numbers eclipse Otago Polytechnic’s 2017 December record of 1463.

    For the third successive year, Otago Polytechnic will hold two December graduation ceremonies at the Dunedin Town Hall. They will be preceded by a parade through central Dunedin, starting at 11am.

    Phil Ker, Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive, says the number of graduands reflects the attractiveness of our programmes, the quality of our teaching and our innovative approaches to learning.

    “Otago Polytechnic’s varied programmes help to address some marked skills shortages, not only in Dunedin and Otago, but throughout New Zealand. Our achievements in the face of declining sector enrolments reflect our success in servicing not only school leavers but experienced adults in the workplace.”

    A strong, high-performing and resilient organisation, Otago Polytechnic provides “tremendous benefits” for Dunedin and Otago, including contributing more than $300 million a year to the Otago economy, according to a recent Economic Impact Report.

    “We contribute to our communities in other ways, too – through student projects, sponsorships, and making our resources, including buildings and equipment, freely available,” Phil says.

    “Recently, we became the first organisation in New Zealand to win the Baldrige-affiliated Performance Excellence Study Award (PESA), a prestigious organisational excellence award.

    “Achieving excellence on the world stage is only possible because of the efforts, expertise and commitment of our excellent staff, of whom we are justifiably proud.”

    Otago Polytechnic’s graduation ceremonies will be held at the Dunedin Town Hall, on Friday 14 December (12.30pm-2.30pm and 3.30pm-5.30pm) 

    Watch a live stream of each ceremony

  • Otago Polytechnic graduand offered Design internship at Fisher & Paykel (December 10 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Product Design graduand Rohina Brinsdon has taken up an internship at award-winning Dunedin company Fisher & Paykel Ltd.

    Rohina has been invited to take part in a project encompassing inclusive design and design for the aging population.

    The mother-of-three, who completed a Certificate in Creative Studies at Otago Polytechnic before enrolling in the Bachelor of Design (Product), enjoys the mix of a wide range of disciplines — including art, graphic design, research, computer-aided design — as well as collaborating with others.

    “Fisher & Paykel is a global brand, and well respected in the industry, so the opportunity to work and learn there over this summer is fantastic,” says Rohina, who will attend an Otago Polytechnic’s graduation ceremony at the Dunedin Town Hall on Friday 14 December.

    “I have been asked to research inclusive design, which is design that is accessible to people of many different capabilities, such as people with disabilities, the elderly and people who are visually impaired.

    “I have looked at inclusive design on the Internet, and I attended a VICTA (Visually Impaired Charitable Trust Aotearoa) meeting where I talked with the members about issues they face due to their low vision.

    “It’s good to be prepared, but not too prepared, because it’s hard to let go of preconceived ideas.”

    Fisher & Paykel Chief Designer Lauren Palmer says the Dunedin-based design team welcomesRohina’s input.

    “Our design approach sees us put the end-user at the centre of our process, and we’re excited to have Rohina come on board over the summer and assist us as we look more deeply into how we best serve the needs of a wide variety of users.

    “At Fisher & Paykel, we are interested in both physical and cognitive ergonomics, and about how appliances make us feel. 

    “We are driven by the fundamental question ‘How do people live?’ And we are curious about not only the function and performance of our products, but also the emotional role they play in people’s lives. 

    “Domestic appliances are often required to be multidisciplinary, not only performing multiple functions but also working with different people with differing skills, all of whom still want the same levels of control and precision.”

    Otago Polytechnic Academic Leader (Product Design) MachikoNiimi is “thrilled” over Rohina’s Fisher & Paykel internship.

    “Completing your degree one week and stepping into a paid internship the next is great. 

    Fisher & Paykel is one of the largest international product development companies in Dunedin and has always been supportive of our programme and our students.

    “This opportunity is another example of how Otago Polytechnic’s Product Design programme produces work-ready and industry-relevant graduates.

    “And, as a third of the New Zealand population reaches over 65 years of age, we need to be mindful of designing products that are both practical and desirable.”

    Earlier this year, Rohina was invited to work as a paid design intern at Dunedin fireplace company Escea Ltd.

    “Internships are a great way for learners to experience real-world problems while working collaboratively to achieve real outcomes,” Machiko says.

    Read more about our Product Design programme 

  • Otago Polytechnic celebrates opening of Central brewery and trades facility (December 3 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic celebrated the opening of its new craft brewery and trades building at its Central Otago Campus on Saturday 1 December.

    Rough Rock Brewing Company is part of a $3 million redevelopment of Otago Polytechnic’s Bannockburn site, including a new trades block that will also house carpentry and automotive facilities.

    Students will start using the new facilities in early 2019.

    The new trades and brewery building is the second stage of a two-stage, $3 million project at Central Campus. A $1.5 million student accommodation complex opened earlier this year.

    The Central Otago Campus open day on Saturday also featured the auction of a three-bedroom house. Built by Central Otago carpentry students, the house fetched $178,000. A small shed was also auctioned for $8100, the profit from the shed supporting an Otago Polytechnic engineering project in Vanuatu.

    “The open day was hugely successful,” Alex Huffadine, Head of Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus, says.

    “It was a celebration of not only the official opening of phase one of our new campus development and our new brewing facility, Rough Rock Brewing Co, but it was also the first time we have really showcased all that we offer to the local community.

    “One of our key objectives moving forward is to work closer with the local community. We intend to be more than just a tertiary education provider. We also plan to tap into the edu-tourism market while at the same cementing Central Campus as a community facility.”

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

  • Otago Polytechnic Charity House auction raises $176k (December 3 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic’s annual Charity House auction has raised $176,000.

    Each year for the past 12 years, Otago Polytechnic carpentry students have built a four-bedroom home with guidance from lecturers and the generous support of many local businesses. 

    About 100 people attended the auction at Otago Polytechnic’s L Block on Saturday, 24 November. The Charity House sold for $271,000, eclipsing last year’s previous record price of $270,000.

    Proceeds from the sale of the fully furnished Charity House go to United Way, which distributes the funds to charities and worthy causes within Otago; as well as to Otago Polytechnic’s Education Foundation, which provides scholarships to students.

    The figure of $176,000 is what remains after taking into account associated costs.

    Last year, Otago Polytechnic celebrated a milestone $1 million raised by the annual Charity House initiative by hosting a Million Dollar Dinner, which raised an additional $30,000 for local charities.

    Otago Polytechnic thanks the many generous sponsors involved in building and fitting out the Charity House.

    Read more about the Charity House, including sponsors

  • Otago Polytechnic students head to India (November 20 2018)

    A trio of Otago Polytechnic students are preparing to leave for India, where they will spend the next four weeks teaching children a range of sports-related activities.

    Third-year Bachelor of Applied Science (Physical Activity, Health & Wellness) students Darcy Buchanan, Martine Matipo-Kolisko and first-year student Leonie Palmer will initially be accompanied by Kim Park, Senior Lecturer at Otago Polytechnic’s Institute of Sport, Exercise & Health.

    The students are among 172 young New Zealanders who have been awarded prestigious Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Asia (PMSA) as part of the August 2018/19 round.

    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern made the announcement in Singapore at the weekend.

    The Otago Polytechnic students arrive in Mumbai on 21 November for a month-long experience that includes a work placement at Smt Sulochanadevi Singhania School, which has a roll of 7000. They will also visit a rural school and have arranged to visit sights of interest such as the Taj Mahal.

    “As part of the BAppSci, the students are required to do a large number of work placements in a sport, exercise or health context,” Kim explains.

    “Within these placements they get to demonstrate and, hopefully, improve their capabilities such communication, teamwork, leadership, organisation and initiative. All these are transferable skills that employers say they really want in graduates.”

    While working in Singhania School, the group will teach primary-aged students fundamental movement skills using a “Games Sense” approach to promote learning.

    Game Sense utilizes modified games to teach and then subsequently practise sports-specific skills. The approach differs from physical education classes in India, which are teacher directed and drill based.

    The Otago Polytechnic group will be joined by students from Flinders University, Adelaide. 

    “We did this in 2017 and it was a great success and worth offering again in 2018,” Kim says.

    A first-year student, Leonie is looking forward to what will be her first overseas experience.

    “It’s definitely a chance to challenge myself. I hope I can pass on some of my knowledge around athletics to the school pupils.”

    Third-year students Darcy and Martine are also relishing the opportunity and regard the India adventure as a chance to teach as well as learn.

    “I’m really excited,” Darcy says. “I went to China as part of my studies earlier this year and really enjoyed it. It gave me a taste of a completely different culture.

    “There will be challenges, but we’ll give it 100%.”

    Martine: “It’s a chance to also teach these kids a bit about where we come from – as well as pass on some skills, obviously.

    “I think it’s also important to recognise that we can learn a lot from these kids, too.”

    A group of Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Applied Management students also received PMSAs for a one-semester exchange to Ritsumeikan University, Japan, starting in March 2019.

    Students will examine the economic development of Japan, contemporary Japanese culture, and Asia-Pacific studies in a multi-disciplinary curriculum that fosters a global perspective.

    “We cultivate opportunities for our students overseas to give them insights into other cultures, to experience cultural diversity and develop cultural competence,” says Marc Doesburg, Director Global Engagement, Otago Polytechnic.

    “Evidence indicates that students who study abroad have better grades, experience less attrition and graduate at higher rates than students who do not study abroad, and have a competitive edge on the job market.”

    The PMSA programme is funded by the New Zealand Government and administered by Education New Zealand. The PMSA was first launched five years ago and was extended to Latin America with the launch of the PMSLA in 2016. 

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s International partnerships

     

  • PMSA students reflect on China experience (November 20 2018)

    A quartet of Otago Polytechnic Sports and Exercise students have recently expanded their horizons courtesy of the Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Asia programme.

    Post Graduate Diploma of Applied Science learners Emily Hodges, Bennett Jones, George Renton and Marcus Panton spent six weeks in Shanghai, China, where they were involved in an American Football physical conditioning project.

    Described as a “cross-cultural collaborative sports training programme”, the project builds on previous work by Brendon Timmins, Principal Lecturer, Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health, Otago Polytechnic, who visited Shanghai Institute of Technology in 2014 and again in 2017.

    “It was an honour to work as a strength and conditioning coach with Team Aurora - Shanghai Institute of Technology's American Football team, which is the top Chinese university team in its league and consists solely of players from a nation steeped in tradition and history,” Bennett says.

    “Six weeks in a foreign country can be difficult enough at times, let alone living on campus at a solely Mandarin-speaking university and helping educate technical aspects of strength and conditioning. However, with challenge came change and I learned quickly that a smile and positive body language can go a long way.” 

    Emily says the language barrier was also an opportunity.

    “It tests you as a professional -- especially in a scenario in which you are having to teach and direct. However, this language barrier forced us to think of and use alternative sources of communication, which I think was beneficial for my growth as a professional. 

    “I just want to thank Otago Polytechnic, the New Zealand Government and Shanghai Institute of Technology for making this opportunity possible. It was such a great experience.”

    George agrees: “I learnt so much about myself. Working with the team and the university staff was awesome.”

    The Prime Minister's Scholarship for Asia aims to strengthen New Zealand's ability to engage with key Asian trading partners, as well as improve the skills of the workforce.

    The PMSA programme is funded by the New Zealand Government and administered by Education New Zealand. The PMSA was first launched five years ago and was extended to Latin America with the launch of the PMSLA in 2016. 

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s International partnerships

  • Dunedin School of Art student wins national award (November 8 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Dunedin School of Art student Hope Duncan has won the Rembrandt Fashion and Textile section of the 2018 ECC NZ Student Craft and Design Awards.

    Hope, who is studying a Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts (Textiles), has built on her previous experience – last year she was “highly commended” at the ECC Awards, at which she received “invaluable” feedback from people working in the textile and design industry.

    “I was thrilled,” Hope says of her experience at the awards night in Wellington on Thursday 1 November.

    “Looking around at the top entries on the night, there were so many fantastic, labour-intensive and well thought through works. To be recognised among them was an honour; to win my section was a privilege.

    “As a student there is huge validation in receiving something like this. Often our works are not viewed outside the classroom, so to have those involved with the industry giving positive feedback . . . it lets you know that all the hours learning and making were well spent.”

    Hope’s describes her winning entry, A Beautiful Deception, as “a textural response and conversation” about the hidden damages of the use of synthetics in the textiles industry.

    “Among the carefully woven traditional threads are modern interruptions to the well-planned grid, moving the piece from straight lines to an intricate story told in thread.”

    Hope received $1000 in prizemoney, some of which enabled her to travel up to Wellington for the awards night as well as spend some time visiting art galleries.

    “I plan on putting the remaining money toward further learning. There is so much to learn and explore within weaving and wool and I know I am only just beginning.

    “I would love to gain work within the textile industry, as a designer or maker, and to be able to use ‘making’ as a way of assisting people would be fantastic, too.”

    In 2017 Hope graduated with a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy.

    “However, on graduation, I decided I wanted to spend some hands-on time creating. I felt my degree had satisfied my desire for academic challenge, but I still had a deep desire to create – so I enrolled for the Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts.”

    Read more about Hope here

     

    Read more about our Art programmes

     

     

  • Occupational Therapy students bring street art to rest homes (November 8 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic School of Occupational Therapy students are bringing Dunedin’s street art to rest home residents this week.

    The year-1 Bachelor of Occupational Therapy learners, who have been involved in placements within local community groups in recent months, are taking a multimedia presentation around various Dunedin rest homes.

    The presentation includes images, video, music and commentary on various pieces of street art.

    “We are aiming to use different types of sensations, such as visuals and auditory descriptions of the colours, textures, shapes and environment of the paintings, to provide a diverse sensory experience,” year-1 student Natajsha Nesdoly explains.

    “We are also sharing facts about the artists and descriptions of the paintings. Explaining the locations of the murals is important, because certain streets will have changed a lot since the residents have last seen them. 

    “We hope that seeing the beautiful art around Dunedin brings a sense of connection and pride,” Natajsha says.

    “We were able to go out in the community and take most of the photos/videos ourselves. Seeing the murals first-hand allows us to share our experiences with residents and also have them express their opinions of the paintings.” 

    Sarah Redfearn, Lecturer, School of Occupational Therapy, says the idea came from a student whose fieldwork last year included a presentation to rest home residents.

    “It is about encouraging residents to remain involved in their communities,” Sarah says.

    “And if some can’t get out and about because of a range of conditions, then bringing a sense of community to them is important, too. And it may also help motivate more field trips.”

    Read more about our Occupational Therapy programmes

     

  • Stellar judging panel for iD International Emerging Designer Awards (November 6 2018)

    iD Dunedin Fashion Week has announced a stellar designer judging panel for the 2019 iD International Emerging Designer Awards.

    The iD Emerging Designer Show – for graduates with up to five years experience – celebrates its 15th year in 2019.

    In recognition of the contribution the award has made to New Zealand fashion design, organisers have announced an esteemed panel of New Zealand judges, all of whom are of international renown. Head judge Tanya Carlson will be joined by designers Kate Sylvester, Margi Robertson of Nom’D, and Benny Castles of WORLD, who has become known by many as a judge on Project Runway NZ.      

    Next year marks 20 years of iD Dunedin Fashion Week. 

    For the first time, iD International Emerging Designers will present at the designer runway show, meaning young designers will have their innovative collections featured in one half of the show, with the other half of the show dedicated to established local and New Zealand designers.

    The shows are being held for the first time at Dunedin’s beautiful Regent Theatre on Friday 15 March and Saturday 16 March 2019.

    Co-Chair and Creative Director of iD, Barton says: “Being selected as a finalist in the iD International Emerging Designer is potentially a life-changing opportunity for aspiring designers and recent graduates to gain experience and build networks within the fashion industry.”

    Since 2004 iD International Emerging Designer has showcased incredible design talent and launched world-class careers with fashion houses including Benetton Sisley, Vivienne Westwood and Burberry. 

    Abby van Schreven, co-owner of prominent New Zealand fashion brand Maaike, was a finalist in the first iD International Emerging Fashion Design Awards in 2006, showing her graduate collection as an Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design student.

    Abby says being a finalist gave her confidence in her abilities as a designer early on in her career.

    “Getting that recognition and chance to show on a global platform like the Emerging Designer Awards was pretty amazing. I was only young (20) and getting that validation that my ideas are good was really cool. It made me think, ‘Oh yeah, I can do this’.”

    The 15th annual iD International Emerging Designer show is presented in partnership with Otago Polytechnic. The iD Dunedin Fashion committee values the ongoing support offered by Otago Polytechnic in recognising and developing emerging generations of fashion industry leaders. 

    Tickets for iD Dunedin Fashion Week will be available through Ticket Direct from Saturday 1st December.

    The deadline for applications for the 2019 iD International Emerging Designer is 30 November 2018.  Apply now

     

  • Photography students celebrate year of innovation (November 6 2018)

    Share in the innovation and creativity of Otago Polytechnic’s Digital Photography students this week.

     Experience the best of the year’s work in a striking and thought-provoking exhibition, which opens to the public on Tuesday 6 November and continues until Sunday 11 November at The Hub.

    The first event in Otago Polytechnic’s month-long Student Showcase, the exhibition features work by 30 students from the New Zealand Diploma in Digital Photography (Level 6) and NZ Certificate in Digital Photography (Level 5) programmes*.

    Digital Photography lecturer Alysha Bailey says the exhibition is more than a celebration of learners’ skills with a camera.

    “It is the culmination of a year spent networking, developing business ideas, working with clients, learning how to market and promote themselves, and collaboration among group members.

    “The exhibition is not an assessment. It is a showcase of their work. The selection of the works is left entirely up to students.

    “Self-reflection and peer critique is important. So the classes sit down and work through what images they think make the grade for an exhibition,” Alysha says.

    “Once they’ve decided what they will exhibit, the students then have to print their work. Seeing their photos come to life in a physical form is really exciting.

    “The students are also excited – and a little nervous – about showing their year’s work.”

    Details:

    Otago Polytechnic Digital Photography Exhibition

    Tuesday 6 November - Sunday 11 November, 9.00am to 5.00pm

    The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin

    *The Certificate in Digital Photography (Level 5) and Certificate in Film and Television (Level 4) are being replaced by the NZ Diploma in Digital Media and Design (Level 5) from 2019. Likewise, the Diploma in Digital Photography (Level 6) is being superseded by the newly designed New Zealand Diploma in Photography (Level 6).

    Read more about our new programmes

     

  • Otago Polytechnic announces name for new brewing project (November 2 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has announced the name of its new Central Otago beer brewing facility – Rough Rock Brewing Company.

    The name is a nod to the landscape of Central Otago, as well as the view that will be enjoyed by learners enrolled in a unique brewing programme, which begins in February 2019.

    “We are looking to strengthen our position in Central Otago, and to do this we need to find niche programmes that can attract students from across the country,” Phil Ker, Chief Executive, Otago Polytechnic, says.

    “We are positioning our Central Campus in part as a centre for food and beverage in the heart of New Zealand’s premier tourism region. This opens up opportunities for edu-tourism. We have several ideas in the pipeline, such as matching beer with food created from local produce.”

    Otago Polytechnic’s brewing qualifications have been crafted to meet industry needs as well as offer an experience that fits with learners’ lifestyles.

    The New Zealand Certificate in Brewing (Level 4),a full-time one-year programme, has been designed for those with a passion for brewing who want to get into the industry, or are seeking to enhance their knowledge and skills. 

    Learners can build on those skills via the six-month Level 5 New Zealand Certificate in Brewing, and a one-year New Zealand Diploma in Brewing (Level 6), both of which will suit those in industry. 

    The Level 5 and Level 6 programmes will initially be offered via Capable NZ, Otago Polytechnic’s Centre for Assessment of Prior Learning. From 2020, the programmes will comprise a mix of on-site and distance learning.

    Jo Brady, Deputy Chief Executive, Otago Polytechnic, is excited by the opportunity:

    “The brewery is a ‘flipped’ model – we are establishing a fully commercial brewery that will be sustainable and that will also support our new brewing programmes.

    “This will make it distinctly different from a traditional approach, which would have brewing programmes supported with a training brewery.”

    The purpose-built brewery is part of a $3 million redevelopment of Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus Bannockburn site, including a new trades block that will also house carpentry and automotive facilities.

    An official opening and open day will be held on December 1. Students will start using the new facilities in early 2019.

    Open day details:

    • Trades Facility opening - 10.30am
    • Rough Rock Brewing Company official opening and tours
    • Carpentry House auction - 12.00pm
    • Agricultural equipment display, lambs and Doug the Dog
    • Pitch and putt golf
    • Coffee and refreshments
    • Orchard and vineyard tours
    • Beer and wine tasting
    • e-bike demonstrations and skill/speed tests
    • Outdoor education team-building activities
    • Stonemasonry project tours

    Read more about our Brewing programmes

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope - Art and Design (October 31 2018)

    Scope (Art & Design) is seeking papers for its 2019 issue.

    Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Art & Design) is peer-reviewed and published annually in November by Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Scope (Art & Design) aims to engage discussion on contemporary research in the visual arts. It is concerned with views and critical debates surrounding issues of practice, theory, history and their relationships as manifested through the visual and related arts and activities, such as sound, performance, curation, tactile and immersive environments, digital scapes and methodological considerations. With New Zealand and its Pacific neighbours as a backdrop, but not its only stage, Scope (Art & Design) seeks to address the matters which concern contemporary artists and arts enquirers in their environments of practice. It is an open access journal available online here.

    The word limit for a feature article is 4000 words (less for other formats). Formats include: articles; essays; artist’s pages, logs and travel reports; reviews of exhibitions, residencies and publications; moving and interactive works (to be negotiated with the editors for the online version, with contextualising paragraphs and stills to appear in the hardcopy version). Other suggested formats will also be considered.

    Please send submissions to the editor. For further information or any questions about possible submissions please contact Pam McKinlay, Editorial Team Liaison, in the first instance. We are accepting submissions currently and the deadline for final copy is 30 May, 2019.

    Kind regards,

    Professor Leoni Schmidt
    Editor, Scope: Art and Design

    Image credit: Hannah Joynt, Oturehua, 2018, pastel on matt board, 50 x 50 cm, used by permission.

  • Call for Papers: Junctures - Indigenisation (October 31 2018)

    Kia Tu Ki te Tahi.  When we stand, we stand as one. 


    Call for Papers: Junctures: The Journal of Thematic Dialogue. Issue 20. Theme: indigenisation

    Across the globe, Indigenous and First Nations peoples have largely been left out of conversations regarding education policy and practice.  Many diverse groups and nations share a similar history of colonisation, resulting in them being passive acceptors rather than active participants in education.

    Emanating from social justice through inclusion, equity and power sharing, indigenisation is not merely an add-on deriving from another world perspective: it presents opportunities to challenge cultural preconceptions and the way we order the world.

    By enacting indigenisation, we partake in the transformation of some service or idea, embracing key values and practices that may formerly have been overshadowed by colonization.  Reclaiming voice and increasing the influence of Indigenous people in education, employment and governance is a key outcome from indigenisation.

    Indigenisation encourages Indigenous peoples to embrace authentic cultures and values and share their knowledge with non-Indigenous peoples, creating pathways for adaption to local ways, and fostering the adoption of indigenous values and practices in our work and daily lives.

    Where collaboration and cohabitation lead to a genuinely co-created culture with the best of both worldviews and technologies, the integration of the Other shapes a new ‘normal’.

    Junctures invites submissions from authors on the theme of Indigenisation, whether from the hard sciences, humanities, visual, sonic and performing arts, social sciences, law, education or medicine.

     

    Expressions of interest open now.

    FINAL DEADLINE for papers: 30 April, 2019

    Editors: junctures@op.ac.nz

    Marc Doesburg, Director Global Engagement

    Ron Bull, Tumuaki Whakaako

     

  • Otago Polytechnic to be presented with excellence award (October 30 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic will be presented with a prestigious organisational excellence award — the Baldrige-affiliated Performance Excellence Study Award (PESA) — on Wednesday October 31.

    Otago Polytechnic is the first organisation in New Zealand to undergo an assessment process comparable to that for the United States Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and to reach the required standard.

    Administered by Business Excellence NZ (endorsed by the American Society of Quality), the PESA involves rigorous examination by United States-based examiners against seven core Baldrige Performance Excellence Criteria to determine organisational excellence by world-class standards.

    The US Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is one of the most internationally recognised frameworks for business excellence. Globally, many countries operate national quality awards aligned with Baldrige or have similar core criteria.

    Key performance indicators and/or highlights noted by the examiners, include:

    • Otago Polytechnic’s strong organisational vision and culture of excellence
    • High levels of student satisfaction and employer satisfaction with Otago Polytechnic graduates
    • Excellent educational performance indicators (course completions, student progression, qualifications and course retention)
    • Sound financial performance and growth in overall EFTs/enrolments
    • High number of Ako Aotearoa Awards for Teaching Excellence
    • High levels of workforce engagement and staff satisfaction
    • Organisational agility and leading-edge innovation through a diverse provision of educational experiences. For example: EduBits, Otago Polytechnic’s suite of micro-credentials

    The journey towards PESA recognition was initiated more than a decade ago by Chief Executive Phil Ker, who had a vision to develop and embed a culture committed to continuous improvement. 

    The award-winning application was Otago Polytechnic’s fourth attempt, the institution making its first PESA submission in 2012. 

    “After each submission, we receive immensely valuable feedback, which guides our improvement action plans,” Joanne Greatbanks, Director: Performance Improvement explains.

    “Otago Polytechnic is passionate about providing our learners with a ‘wow!’ experience. In order to continue to put our learners at the centre of everything we do, we need to continuously evolve, drive and innovate.”  

    Jo Brady, Deputy Chief Executive: People, Performance and Development states:

    “It is true that our people make a better world. We now have a globally recognised award to prove it and we remain committed to continuous improvement as the journey doesn’t have an end point. Our work matters — it has impact and transforms lives, communities and economies.”

    A formal presentation of the Performance Excellence Study Award to Otago Polytechnic will be held at the Hub, Forth St, on Wednesday October 31 at 2.30pm.

  • Students to showcase VR project (October 26 2018)

    A team of information technology and construction students have been hard at work preparing a Virtual Reality (VR) building project ahead of next month’s Auckland Build Expo.

    The project, called Virtual Reality of Sustainable Living Styles, has been a collaboration between students from the Bachelor of Construction, the New Zealand Diploma in Construction and the Graduate Diploma in Information Technology. IT lecturer Suhaimi Latif says it’s the first time such a collaboration has taken place.

    Construction lecturer Don Samarasinghe says the project involved creating a virtual reality model of sustainable building features including earth building techniques, a rainwater harvesting tank, a dry toilet, solar panels, and a green wall.

    The aim of the project is to promote sustainability in construction studies.

    “We built our team working skills and communication skills in addition to the improved learnings on sustainable building features. We feel really proud and happy about the overall experience.”

    The group’s finished product is a virtual tour of a sustainable house, that viewers can explore on their phones, laptops or tablets, or using a virtual reality headset.

    The students began by looking at issues with modern New Zealand buildings including toxicity, lack of breathability, as well as the  high life cycle costs of concrete, steel framed, and timber framed buildings.

    They researched sustainable building materials including rammed earth, cob, mud bricks, unfired bricks, and straw bales. They also visited buildings which use these sustainable materials.

    The team’s objectives were to enhance the sustainability of New Zealand housing, promote sustainable living, increase their capabilities and showcase OPAIC at the Auckland Build Expo.

    The expo at the ASB Showgrounds on November 8 and 9 promises to be New Zealand’s largest construction, architecture, facilities management, build and design expo.

    It will include thousands of attendees, more than 200 exhibitors, 60 build partners and 90 senior speakers.

    Dr Samarasinghe says VR models have been used in tertiary education to provide real-life experiences to learners. Often construction lecturers find it hard to engage in experiential learning activities, such as site visits, due to hectic schedules and health and safety risks.

    “VR models can, therefore, be used as an alternative way of conducting virtual construction site visits, as part of an effective curriculum delivery process.”

  • Call for Papers: Scope - Fashion issue (October 16 2018)

    We are pleased to announce our call for papers and proposals for the next special Fashion issue of Scope (Art and Design) to be published in November 2019. Reflecting the diversity of contexts in which fashion operates, is studied and practiced, the theme of this issue is ‘Fashion Fluid’. Authors are encouraged to consider this theme broadly and we welcome submissions from all fields and disciplines that contribute to critical debates and new understandings of fashion and the fashion system.

    We are open to a range of formats for inclusion, including: articles, perspectives, essays, designer pages, exhibition reviews, project reports, photo essays. Proposals for other formats will also be considered.

    Your submission should include a 300 word abstract with clear title and up to 5 key words. Please also include a short biography, including your institutional position and affiliation (where relevant); and contact information (postal, email and telephone number). Please ensure this is provided as a separate sheet from the abstract for review purposes.

    For publication, all photographs require written copyright permission. Consent forms are available on request. Please include low resolution images for the submission. Please note that final images for publication need to be high resolution (300dpi), CMYK images.

    Acceptance for inclusion will reflect an expectation for high standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to the Chicago referencing style. For more information, please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style and consult prior issues for examples. www.thescopes.org

     

    All submissions will undergo double blind peer review.

    Submissions should be sent to Pip McQuillan at pip.mcquillan@op.ac.nz

    Submissions close 1st April 2019.

    Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Art & Design) is a peer-reviewed journal published annually in November by Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. The series Scope (Art & Design) aims to engage discussion on contemporary research in the visual arts and design.

    EBSCO Database: Scope: Contemporary Research Topics (Art & Design) is catalogued on the EBSCO Database in recognition of academic quality and alignment with international peer review processes. An online version of the journal is available free at www.thescopes.org; ISSN (for hardcopy version): 1177- 5653; ISSN (for online version): 1177-5661. © 2017 the authors; © illustrations, the artists or other copyright owners, unless otherwise indicated as reproduced per GPL or Creative Commons (CC) licenses.

     

  • Art School Alumni Successes at World of Wearable Arts Awards (October 2 2018)

    Congratulations to Tatyanna Meharry, Dunedin School of Art Alumni and Ceramics Diploma tutor.*

     

    WAR sTOrY by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry (Christchurch, New Zealand)
    Winner: Supreme WOW Award
    Winner: Aotearoa Section

     

    Tatyanna Meharry and her sister Natasha English have won the supreme award at the 2018 World of WearableArt Awards, for the second (unprecedented) time.

    The pair's garment, WAR sTOrY, commemorates more than 128,000 New Zealand men and women who served in World War I, of whom 18,000 never returned. WearableArt founder and head judge Dame Suzie Moncrieff said WAR sTOrY was described by judges as a "thought-provoking narrative" flawless in its execution, and powerful storytelling through a work of art.

    When Meharry and English won the supreme award for the first timein 2013, their garment The Exchange  a two-garment entry, of individually made ceramic feathers and coins, also had a historical theme, on the Treaty of Waitangi.

    The sisters first entered WOW together in 2013 and entered every year since then except 2015, Meharry said. Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry also won top honours in the Film & Costume section of the 2016 with Baroque Star. For Richard Taylor of Weta Workshops, it was the piece’s expert construction, innovative use of materials and clever play on iconography that elevated Baroque Star above what was, by all accounts, an extremely high calibre collection of entries. "Translating these artistically-rich periods of history into the realm of film and costume requires a high level of imagination and the creators of Baroque Star really rose to the challenge to craft something special." Baroque Star was also runner up to Supreme award in 2016.

     

    Kākāpō Queen by Stephanie Cossens (Wellington, New Zealand)
    Runner Up: Weta Workshop Emerging Designer Award

     

    Another entry by recent graduate Stephanie Cossens, with Kākāpō Queen, won runner up in this year's  Weta Workshop Emerging Designer Award. Stephanie Cossens first time entry at WOW, was created to raise awareness for these critically endangered birds.  Cossens studied visual arts at Otago Polytechnic, graduating with BVA Honours in 2016, and works as a freelance artist out of Honey Badger Creative Studio. To see more of Stephanies art practice see video here > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbycjZwHWwg

     

    Read more in an interview with Tatyanna in the Otago Daily Times, by Brittany Pooley.

     

     * Tatyanna is a distance tutor, in the NZ Dip in Art and Design (Ceramics) programme. The programme is delivered offsite at various locations, (see link for more info) and at The Busy Finch in Christchurch.

     

     

     

     

  • Culinary Arts graduate tempts the taste buds (September 27 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Culinary Arts graduate Penelope Baldwin is continuing her quest to educate others about the benefits of bitter flavours.

    Penelope, who graduated with a Bachelor of Culinary Arts in 2016, is a trained naturopath, medical herbalist and holistic nutritionist and the founder and creator of Botanical Kitchen, a company that combines herbs and traditional medicine with food.

    Penelope and partner Nick Maguire have recently opened the Kind Grocer, a vegan grocery store, on Vogel St, Dunedin.

    A project in the second year of Penelope’s Bachelor of Culinary Arts programme left a bitter taste in her mouth but led to the sweet smell of success.

    “I was driving around and noticed hawthorn berries growing at the side of the road and started wondering if I could use them.

    “The berries were extremely bitter and I was nearly going to throw them out but instead they now form the basis of a line of drinks I’ve developed.

    Penelope wants to bring back bitterness as a flavour of choice.

    “The Western world has lost its taste for bitter foods and it’s been replaced by sugar. The Chinese include bitter food as part of every meal, bitter foods have health benefits and it’s my mission to get that balance right.”

    Penelope and partner Nick Maguire have opened the Kind Grocer, a vegan grocery store, on Vogel St, Dunedin.

    Read the Otago Daily Times feature article

  • Otago Polytechnic features strongly at Best Design Awards (September 24 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has claimed multiple medals at the Designers Institute of New Zealand Best Design Awards 2018.

    Bachelor of Design (Product) graduate Tania Turei won a Gold in the Ngā Aho section for her “Pae” seating entry, the judges loving the simplicity and modularity of the laminated wooden bench, which they described as having “some subtle cultural references to manaia and a haka stance”.

    Another Bachelor of Design (Communication) graduate, Erin Broughton, claimed Gold in the Student Graphics category for “Bones”. A series of magazines for student radio station 91FM, “Bones” was described by judges as “thought-provoking and challenging”.

    The innovation of Otago Polytechnic’s Food Design Institute was also recognised through a collaboration with creative agency Geometry Global for client Sanitarium – which won a Gold in the Exhibition and Temporary Structures category.

    Lecturers Tony Heptinstall and Timothy Lynch and a team of staff and students worked with Sanitarium to produce the “So Good Garden of Goodness”, comprising 3000 edible products at Auckland’s Britomart in February.

    Bachelor of Design (Communication) graduates Michael Smith, Becki Jones, Jaimee Caffell and Sherman Sreedhar won Bronze in the Student Moving Image category for the 3D animated backdrops they developed for the Fortune Theatre production of “Into the Woods”.

    Fraser Dixon, a Year-2 Bachelor of Architectural Studies student, won Bronze in the

    Student Spatial category for “Chaos and Order”, a series of architectural concept studies.

    A wide range of Otago Polytechnic School of Design projects were among the finalists in the Best Design Awards, an annual showcase of excellence in graphic, spatial, product, interactive and motion design.

    “We are really proud of the award winners and finalists,” says Caroline Terpstra, Acting Head of College – Art, Design and Architecture.

    “The Best Design Awards are a platform for students and graduates to present their work to an audience of design professionals and to have their work evaluated alongside outstanding student design projects at a national level,” Caroline says.

    “The results reflect the commitment, passion and expertise of Otago Polytechnic’s Design lecturers as well as the support staff who are an indispensable part of our teaching and learning environment.”

    Entries this year included group and individual projects and collaborations with a range of Dunedin institutions, among them a recent Otago Museum exhibition, “Things Change: Martin Phillipps and The Chills”. The result of a collaboration between museum staff and Otago Polytechnic Communication Design students, it was a finalist in the Spatial-Exhibition section.

    “Previous Best Awards finalists and winners have built on their success to launch their design careers in New Zealand and overseas,” Caroline says.

    Last year, Otago Polytechnic third-year Product Design projects claimed two Best Design Awards – a silver in the student product category (Glo wheelchair) and bronze in the student product category (Cactus Hammock). A first-year Communication Design student claimed Bronze in the student graphics section (Roller Derby zine series).

    Otago Polytechnic award winners and finalists in the Designers Institute of New ZealandBest Design Awards 2018:

    Award winners

    Gold – Nga Aho, Student: Tania Turei, Pae seating (lecturers, Machiko Nimi, Andrew Wallace, Tim Armstrong).

    Gold – Graphics, Student: Erin Broughton, Bones (lecturer, Matt Galloway).

    Gold – Exhibition and Temporary Structures: Geometry (in collaboration with Otago Polytechnic’s Food Design Institute), “Garden of Goodness”.

    Bronze – Moving Image, Student: Michael Smith, Becki Jones, Jaimee Caffell, Into the Woods (lecturer, Jon Wilson).

    Bronze – Spatial, Student: Fraser Dixon, Chaos and Order (lecturer, Ross T Smith).

     

    Finalists

    Product, Student: Ian McDowall, Francis Bingham, Yellow Eyed Penguin monitoring system (lecturers, Machiko Niimi, Tim Armstrong); Tania Turei, Pae seating (lecturers, Machiko Nimi, Andrew Wallace, Tim Armstrong)

    Spatial, Student: Joshua Weir, Bare (lecturer, Ross T Smith).

    Graphics, Student: 2017 Cohort, Dust (lecturers, Leigh Paterson, Matthew Galloway). 

    Spatial, Exhibition: Otago Museum – Things Change: Martin Phillipps and the Chills (in collaboration with Otago Polytechnic School of Design lecturer Martin Kean and year-3 Communication Design students Mitchell Allen, Josh Caldwell, Sean Funnell, Jessie Hamilton, MJ Heap and Scott Kingsbury).

    Read more about our Design programmes

     

     

  • Te Pā Tauira wins national design award (September 21 2018)

    Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village has won a NZ Wood-Resene Timber Design Award.

    Te Pā Tauira, the first five-storey, all-timber building to be completed in the country, was the popular winner of the XLam NZ Multi-Storey Timber Building category in the 2018 NZ Wood-Resene Timber Design Awards, announced at a gala event in Auckland on Thursday 20 September.

    Judges praised the highly efficient modular layout of the Dunedin student accommodation complex, saying it enabled efficient offsite prefabrication, which significantly reduced construction time, minimised waste and reduced cost.

    “This building [is] a great example of multi-storey cross-laminated timber construction,” they said.

    “Challenges in relation to meeting building codes and safety regulations for exposed timber structures have been overcome, and the building delivers a pleasant and comfortable living, learning and social environment for a new generations of students.” 

    The project (entered by Mason & Wales, Naylor Love Dunedin, Logic Group, and Kirk Roberts, Tricia Love Consultants) was also a finalist in the Engineering Innovation category.

    Phil Ker, Chief Executive, Otago Polytechnic, praised the high standard of workmanship, outstanding design and sustainable principles of Te Pā Tauira.

    “We are very proud of Te Pā Tauira. It rivals the best student accommodation in Australasia, as well as other enduring, high-quality accommodation.”

    Earlier this year, Te Pā Tauira won the Excellence prize in the Resene Green Building Property Award section, as well as a Merit Award in the Arrow International Multi-Unit Residential Property section of the 2018 Property Council New Zealand Excellence Awards.

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, Te Pā Tauira uses sustainable materials throughout, including laminated timber within its unique structural frame. 

    At 6000sq m, the $22 million Te Pā Tauira is the largest timber-framed structured building by height and volume in New Zealand.

    It is also the first student accommodation complex of its size to use pre-fabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels, which are up to 80% lighter than concrete – and 100% sustainable.

    The 231-bed furnished residential village opened its doors to students in February, and was officially opened by the Hon Dr David Clark on 1 June. 

    Just a short walk from campus and Dunedin’s city centre, Te Pā Tauira offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira

  • Keeping up with change and growth (September 18 2018)

    ODT talks to Alex Huffadine about education and development at Central Campus. Read the article 

  • Fashion student prepares for "dream" opportunity in Vienna (September 17 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic student Georgia Ferguson is preparing to leave Dunedin for a nine-month study exchange in Vienna, where she will work on her Master of Design while learning from a world-renowned master of fashion.

    Georgia is the first Otago Polytechnic student to be accepted into a new exchange relationship with the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.

    While there, she will study under Professor of Fashion Hussein Chalayan, named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential innovators of the 21st century and described by Vogue as the "premier intellectual designer of his generation".

    “I could only dream of studying under a person of his calibre,” Georgia says, adding that the University of Applied Arts in Vienna names a new designer to lead its fashion programme every three years. Previous appointments include Karl Lagerfeld and Raf Simmons.

    Georgia believes the opportunity to learn from Chalayan will add resonance to her Masters thesis, which will explore Dunedin’s creative and cultural drivers and, in particular, her own design practice within that sphere.

    “In order to more deeply examine some of the influences on Dunedin’s creativity, I need to remove myself from here in order to get a different perspective.

    “So I’m hoping the contrast of studying in Vienna under a famous fashion designer will provide further insights.

    “I have travelled lots – I’ve lived in Vanuatu, Japan, England, Italy and Australia – but I really like Dunedin, so I want to understand what inspires me to be creative in such a place.”

    Marc Doesburg, Director Global Engagement, says the relationship with the University of Applied Arts Vienna, is another example of Otago Polytechnic cultivating opportunities for students overseas.

    “Such opportunities give learners insights into other cultures, helping them experience cultural diversity and develop cultural competence.”

    Georgia, who has “always” been interested in fashion, enrolled in a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) at Otago Polytechnic when she left school. In her second year, she spent a semester studying at Milan’s Istituto Europeo di Design.

    She graduated at the beginning of 2014, worked in Auckland and Sydney for a few years, then returned to Dunedin to embark on post-graduate Design studies.

    “After my Milan experience, I knew I wanted to do more study at an international school so, with that in mind, I enrolled in Honours in Design in 2017,” Georgia explains.

    For the past two years, Georgia has been working with a fashion start-up, Ultra-Merino. She sees a future in start-ups, “growing small businesses”. Being in a small yet vibrant city helps, too.

    Georgia, who leaves for Vienna at the end of September, staged an exhibition of garments in a pop-up store in Dunedin’s Golden Centre Mall at the weekend.

    The exhibition, titled “Micropublic”, examined the idea that people are drawn to others with similar tastes and beliefs, and was based around three patterns: a trench coat, trousers and a shirt.

    “Each piece has been died a slightly different colour,” Georgia says.

    “The aim was to make it feel like an exhibition rather than a fashion show.”

    Read more about our Fashion programmes

  • Otago Polytechnic staff embrace Māori Language Week (September 12 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic staff are embracing the opportunity to hone their Māori language development as part of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori - Māori Language Week.

    More than 30 staff members have enrolled in the Otago Polytechnic EduBit in “Te Reo Māori in the Workp lace”.

    It forms part of a growing suite of EduBits being developed by Otago Polytechnic and includes 10 key phrases and 40 words that are relevant and applicable to the workplace and industry.

    In order to successfully complete the programme by the end of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, staff will be required to submit evidence of the following:

    *Accurately pronounce introductions, greetings and farewells relevant in your workplace.

    *Use basic te reo Māori in workplace correspondence.

    *Use te reo Māori relevant to your industry or profession.

    “We encourage our staff at Otago Polytechnic to use te reo Māori,” says Ron Bull, Tumuaki: Whakaako.

    “Not everyone has the time and capacity to immerse themselves in learning te reo Māori, but most people would recognise the importance of embedding and using key phrases in the workplace.”

    Otago Polytechnic’s suite of EduBits includes “Te Tiriti o Waitangi/The Treaty of Waitangi: Introduction” and “Tikanga Māori in the Organisation”. The latter requires learners to prove they understand the importance of the application of tikanga Māori and the influences on an individual’s behaviour and practice in their own organisation.

    Jo Brady, Deputy Chief Executive says, “EduBits can be acquired in significantly shorter timeframes than even the smallest qualification available on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework.

    “They are ideal for new and emerging skills areas and can also be tailor-made to satisfy organisation-specific requirements. A key advantage of EduBits is that they can be developed and implemented quickly – just a matter of weeks from conception to delivery.”

    Read more about our EduBits

  • Otago Polytechnic Fashion graduate teams up with Disney (September 10 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion graduate Anna Ross has teamed up with global giant Disney, creating a range of nail polishes to celebrate Mickey Mouse’s 90th birthday.

    Anna, who graduated with a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) from Otago Polytechnic in 2008, worked for several years as a design assistant in Australia before making a major career transition to an entrepreneur.

    The winner of the Young Telstra Victorian Business Women's Award in 2016, Anna founded Kester Black, a brand of ethically produced vegan nail polishes and soaps, in 2014.

    Now one of Australia’s most recognised independent cosmetic brands, Kester Black is sold internationally in the United States, Malaysia, Japan and elsewhere.

    Anna, a long-time fan of all things Disney, first visited Disneyland as a 14-year-old, when her parents took her family on the trip of a lifetime.

    To celebrate Mickey Mouse’s 90th milestone, the Kester Black collection features five nail polishes in classic Mickey colours (red, yellow, white, black and a nude) in bottles displaying his silhouette. The same colours have been used to create a nail-art set.

    Made in Australia, Kester Black’s products are palm oil-free, cruelty-free and vegan. The brand also plans to launch a certified organic range. 

    *Disney will celebrate Mickey Mouse’s birthday on November 18, honouring the release of his first theatrical film, Steamboat Willie, on 18 November, 1928.

  • Otago Polytechnic Engineering students to help Vanuatu community (September 10 2018)

    Dunedin brothers Cameron and Conrad Sinclair are set to roll up their sleeves and get stuck into a range of infrastructure projects on a remote Vanuatu island.

    This weekend the pair will join 14 other students and staff from Otago Polytechnic’s School of Engineering and fly to Paama, where they will work on a variety of WASH (water, sanitation and health) projects.

    Paama, one of the smaller of the 83 islands that comprise the nation of Vanuatu, is a 40-minute flight north of the capital, Port Vila.

    The Otago Polytechnic contingent will spend 10 days on Paama, integrating their classroom-based projects and academic theory with important practical, real-world experience.

    Specifically aimed at students who have completed Civil Engineering programmes in Water and Waste Systems and Water and Waste Management, the projects include water disinfection, desalination, gravity-based water systems, sanitation, solar pumps and solar cooking.

    The project comes on the back of work done by Dunedin’s Highgate Presbyterian Church, which has helped improve infrastructure on the island.

    “We are really excited,” Conrad (19) says.

    “It’s going to be awesome to implement some of the things we have learnt while studying Civil Engineering.”

    Cameron (21) agrees: “A big part of our approach is being able to problem-solve. This includes designing equipment that is relatively simple to maintain or repair. There’s no point taking over high-tech stuff.”

    In the second year of a New Zealand Diploma of Engineering (Civil Engineering), both brothers are taking extra papers that will enable them to progress to a Bachelor of Engineering, should they choose to continue their tertiary studies.

    “I like to visualise and draw solutions to problems,” Cameron says. “I really like the practical aspects of engineering.”

    Having heard “great things” about the Engineering programmes at Otago Polytechnic, the Dunedin-raised brothers chose to remain in the city to study after leaving Kavanagh College.

    Conrad: “We live at home, too, so we still get nice meals.”

    Although they’re not sure exactly what’s on the menu for their Paama experience, the pair are relishing the chance to get involved with the island community. This includes sharing their football (soccer) skills with the local children.

    “We’ve been asked to come along to the school on Paama and share our knowledge of Engineering, Conrad says.

    “We are both into our football so, even though we have to pack lightly, we’ll be taking a bag of balls with us as we’ve been nominated to lead a team when we are there.”

    Although more than a third of their costs have been covered by Otago Polytechnic, the group of 16 have been involved in a range of fund-raising activities in recent months. This includes building sleep-outs, the first of which has been completed and is being auctioned this month.

    The group has also been offering Otago Polytechnic staff and students the opportunity to purchase solar-powered lights that will be donated to households in Vanuatu.

    Richard Nyhof, Head of the College of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences, says the Vanuatu project is another example of Otago Polytechnic’s hands-on learning.

    “Our approach to teaching equips learners with the confidence and ability to tackle real-world problems,” Richard says.

    Read about our Engineering programmes

  • Otago Polytechnic student selected for deer farming experience (September 6 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic student Mikayla Simpson has been accepted into the Future Deer Farmers Experience being hosted by Deer Industry New Zealand.

    Mikayla, who is studying the New Zealand Certificate in Agriculture (Level 3) at Otago Polytechnic’s Central Otago Campus in Cromwell, is one of only three students from throughout New Zealand to be selected.

    She will attend a four-day all-expenses-paid trip to the Waikato and Bay of Plenty, from 10-13 September. She will be visiting farms, marketing companies and a workshop.

    Mikayla says she hopes to gain some deeper insights into what the deer industry has to offer.

    “Deer are different to work with compared to other stock. I hope the experience expands my knowledge to help me build a career in farming. It is also a great way to make contacts in the farming sector.”

    Mikayla has been enjoying her farming-based studies this year.

    With an emphasis on “hands-on” learning, the programme covers a wide range of skills, and has the added benefit of on-farm practical assessments, as well as work placements on high country stations.

    Successful graduates of the programme gain the New Zealand Certificate in Agriculture (Farming Systems) (Level 3) and the New Zealand Certificate in Agriculture (Vehicles, Machinery and Infrastructure) (Level 3). 

    “The course covers the majority of agriculture-related tasks, helping you decide which path in agriculture you wish to take,” Mikayla explains.

    “It has encouraged me to stick to my path of starting shepherding once the course is finished.”

    Read more about our Agriculture programmes

     

     

  • The future is now at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Nursing (August 31 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic’s School of Nursing has entered the head-turning field of augmented reality.

    Otago Polytechnic is working with international company Pearson, which has developed interactive applications that tap into Microsoft’s HoloLens, a headset that incorporates high-definition holograms into a viewer’s surroundings.

    The cutting-edge technology allows nursing students to see 3D images of the body, including organs, as well as assess relatively common conditions that they might not experience on clinical placements.

    Ian Crabtree, Head of School (Nursing), says the use of the interactive tool puts Otago Polytechnic at the forefront of learning and teaching technologies and better prepares learners for real-world situations.

    “Imagine,” Ian says, “a scenario in which a ‘patient’ has gone into anaphylactic shock. The students can sit the patient down and walk around him. When they do that, they’ll see he’s got an injury on his back. From there, they can deduce he might be having a reaction to the antibiotics he’s taken for the injury.”

    Otago Polytechnic nursing staff are currently being trained in the use of the technology, which will be implemented more fully in our nursing programmes in 2019.

    Ian can already see applications for the technology beyond nursing.

    “This could be useful for sport, midwifery and occupational therapy.”

    Pearson, a global learning company, offers a range of teaching and learning services powered by technology. 

    Pearson trainer Linda Bush says the applications have wide-ranging educational benefits.

    “Immersive experiences evoke a sense of being present in a particular environment. This can evoke responses such as empathy.

    “In addition, research shows that learning in such a way is often more deeply embedded in a learner’s memory. It adds another layer to how students can learn.”

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

    Read more about our Nursing programmes

  • New home for iD Dunedin Fashion Week (August 29 2018)

    Iconic experience iD Dunedin Fashion Week is joining forces with the city’s ornate Regent Theatre to create a stunning environment for its 2019 shows.

    As iD prepares to celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2019, it has confirmed a partnership with Dunedin’s historic Regent Theatre, allowing all of its shows to be hosted in the beauty of the city’s restored theatre.

    The opening iD Emerging Designer Show and its runway Dunedin Designer Fashion shows will all be held in The Regent Theatre in a perfect partnership between built design and fashion design.

    iD Dunedin Fashion Week committee chairwoman and Otago Polytechnic School of Design (Fashion) lecturer Professor Margo Barton says iD attendees will be wowed by both the surrounds and the fashion.

    “The Regent Theatre will be utilised in innovative and unexpected ways as designers from across the globe descend on Dunedin to show their creations.

    “We’re very happy that collaborations between local suppliers Southern Lights and Strawberry Sound, the iD Fashion Board and event manager Sonja de Mari continue to drive the event forward, finding new opportunities to engage and inspire audiences as well as supporting our designers,” Margo says.

    “Sonja is ably supported by an energetic skills-based iD Dunedin Fashion Week Board, which is working together to ensure 2019 will be our biggest year yet.”

    Otago Polytechnic continues to be a major sponsor of iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

    Jo Brady, Otago Polytechnic Deputy Chief Executive, People, Performance and Development:

    “Otago Polytechnic is delighted to continue building on the partnership and connecting globally to showcase emerging design talent.”

    The Regent Theatre partnership announcement comes as New Zealand Fashion Week is held in Auckland, including for the first time an iD Dunedin showcase on Saturday 1 September. The sold-out show features archival pieces from the iD International Emerging Designer Awards, alongside a mash-up of Dunedin designers including NOM*d, Carlson, Mild-Red, Lapin, Darlene Gore and others.

    iD Dunedin Fashion Week Fashion runs from Monday 11 March to Sunday 17 March 2019.

    A limited number of premium pre-release tickets will be available for sale from Ticket Direct from Friday 31 August until Tuesday 4 September 2018, using the presale code id2019.

    http://www.ticketdirect.co.nz/Event/Details/187279

     

  • Otago Polytechnic staff in the frame (August 28 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic staff members and a graduate have been involved in the production of a short film, Milk.

    Stefan Roesch, who works as an Analyst in Otago Polytechnic’s Organisational Research Office, is the producer of the film, which tells the story of two German U-boat officers who come ashore to Otago during World War 2 to obtain fresh milk. While there, they are discovered by the widow of a man who has been killed fighting in Europe.

    Liz Stewart, from Learning and Teaching Development, was the Assistant Director of the film. In addition, Graphic Designer Sam Hendry created the promotional material and the production assistant was Otago Polytechnic graduate Annie Theewis (Certificate in Film and Television). 

    About 20 people, including Berlin-based actors Peter Volksdorf and Mike Hoffmann, were involved in the filming, which took place in Dunedin in April this year.

    The film is currently in post-production and a step closer to completion with the launch of a crowdfunding campaign through the Boosted platform.

    The script for Milk was chosen by Short Film Otago as the winning script for its 2016 funding round, was shortlisted for Fresh Shorts funding by the New Zealand Film Commission and received a special mention award from the Mumbai International Short Film Festival.

    At its core, the film is about what happens when adversaries come face-to-face and what they discover about each other.

    Director Pennie Hunt and producer Stefan Roesch were inspired to make a film about cultural misunderstanding and forgiveness between their two home countries.

    “We’re hoping this film will lead to bigger future projects, including feature films,” Pennie says.

    Donations can be made at www.boosted.org.nz/projects/milk

  • Women in I.T. scholarship 'means a lot' (August 23 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has awarded its 2018 “Women in I.T.” scholarship to Heather McDonald.

    Heather, who is in her second year of studying for a Bachelor of Information Technology, says the scholarship means a lot, both personally and financially.

    Worth $1000 for every year of study and awarded to a self-leading and motivated student, the Women in I.T. Scholarship has lifted Heather’s confidence.

    “Although I am not short on motivation to do the best I can, this has definitely given me a boost. It shows people believe that I will continue to excel and complete the Bachelor of Information Technology.”

    Heather welcomes Otago Polytechnic’s support of women in the I.T. sector.

    “The past year and a-half has made me realise that gender has nothing to do with your knowledge or ability to learn new things in the I.T. industry. This comes down to each individual person.

    “The scholarship is a great way to advertise to women who might be thinking about entering the industry but just need that extra little push – to make them feel welcome in an environment that is still predominantly male.”

    Read more about our I.T. programmes

     

  • Sonny Bill Williams enrols with Capable NZ (August 4 2018)

    Sonny Bill Williams has a new goal – to graduate with a Bachelor’s Degree from Otago Polytechnic while continuing his illustrious sporting career.

    No stranger to setting himself fresh challenges, be it in rugby union, sevens, league or boxing, Sonny Bill is among a cohort of 10 players from the Blues Super Rugby club to have enrolled in a Bachelor of Applied Management through Capable New Zealand, a school within Otago Polytechnic that has empowered a raft of sports stars.

    The New Zealand Rugby Players Association and New Zealand Rugby have created the opportunity for players to complete study within their personal development time as part of the joint venture and as specified in their Collective Employment Agreement.

    The Blues group, including Williams, will remain based in Auckland, utilising Otago Polytechnic’s Queen St campus on occasion.

    They follow in the footsteps of a range of elite sportspeople who have studied through Capable NZ.

    These include sevens legend DJ Forbes, Olympic athletics coach Raylene Bates, Black Caps cricketer Grant Elliott, Tongan rugby international Hale T-Pole, Samoan rugby international Seilala Mapusua, Silver Ferns netballers Jodi Brown and Katrina Grant, windsurfing legend Barbara Kendall and White Ferns cricketer Katie Glynn.

    Glenys Ker, Programme Leader of Capable NZ’s undergraduate programmes, has been working closely with the Blues players, who began their studies in June.

    As a facilitator, Glenys works with the players, guiding them through their learning tasks and giving them academic support where necessary.

    “It’s the first time Capable NZ has had a group from a sports club undertake this study with the benefit that they can work as a group, learning and sharing together.

    “They have 10 months to complete their studies and, hopefully, they will graduate in April 2019,” Glenys says, adding it should be stressed the players are continuing their sporting careers.

    “I understand that sport is a big part of their lives — it is their career — and they have actually achieved a lot of things, both in and out of sport.

    “They are beautiful writers. Their ability to reflect on what they do, what they have done, who they are and who they want to be . . . it’s a real privilege to gain such insights,” Glenys says.

    “Credit must also go to the Blues club and their Player Development Manager, Victoria Hood, for supporting the players so strongly in their academic endeavours.

    “They are no different from other students, really. They will get as much support as any student. At the end of the day, they will still have to meet the academic criteria required of a Level 7 New Zealand Qualifications Authority-endorsed degree.”

    Read more about Capable NZ

     

  • Training centre, up she goes (August 1 2018)

    The roof is on, the students are on their way. Read full article

  • Sports Turf learner off to Leaders Camp (July 25 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Sports Turf learner Brennan Honour has been selected to attend the World Federation of Colleges and Polytechnics 2018 World Congress Young Leaders Camp in Melbourne in October.

    The Young Leaders Camp, from 7-11 October, aims to engage professional and technical education students in relevant discussions and debates on the position and role of students in professional and technical education globally

    In addition, the camp enables professional and technical students to make connections with other students from across the globe. It also seeks to embed the voice of students in the World Congress

    “I am very excited,” says Brennan, who is enrolled in Otago Polytechnic’s New Zealand Certificate in Horticulture Services (Sports Turf) programme.

    He will join Otago Polytechnic Nursing student Devon Kilkelly at the camp.

    “I hope to gain valuable knowledge, experience and understanding from the leadership camp to help me be a better leader,” Brennan says.

    Read more about our New Zealand Certificate in Horticulture Services (Sports Turf) programme

     

  • Fashion learner continues awards quest (July 23 2018)

    In her first year of Fashion Design at Otago Polytechnic, Sophie Stevens is once again busily preparing for the Hokonui Fashion Design Awards, to be held in Gore this Friday and Saturday, 27-28 July.

    “I love entering the awards and will continue to because of the challenge,” says Sophie, who first entered the event in 2015 while still at school in Masterton.

    “There is such amazing talent at the awards. It makes me want to develop my designs further and strive for continual excellence.

    “A lot of the time fabrics are what inspire my designs. I love beautiful and unusual fabrics, especially natural fibres — silk is my all-time favourite.

    “I am always looking for combinations of graphic prints, plain and unusual colour combinations to spice up my love of basic silhouettes and shapes.

    “My main priority is to look at proportions, shape, fit and then from there my fabric choices determine how I adapt and construct my pieces.”

    Read more about Sophie’s Hokonui Fashion Design Awards experiences

  • Te Pā Tauira wins national property award (June 20 2018)

    Te Pā Tauira — Otago Polytechnic Student Village has won a 2018 Property Council New Zealand Excellence Award.

    The project claimed the Excellence prize in the Resene Green Building Property Award section of the annual awards, which were announced at a gala dinner at Auckland’s Spark Arena on Friday 15 June.

    Te Pā Tauira also won a Merit Award in the Arrow International Multi-Unit Residential Property section.

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, Te Pā Tauira uses sustainable materials throughout, including laminated timber within its unique structural frame. 

    Phil Ker, Chief Executive, Otago Polytechnic, was delighted to receive the awards at Spark Arena.

    He praised the high standard of workmanship, outstanding design and sustainable principles of Te Pā Tauira.

    “We are very proud of Te Pā Tauira. It rivals the best student accommodation in Australasia, as well as other enduring, high-quality accommodation.”

    At 6000sq m, the $22 million Te Pā Tauira is the largest timber-framed structured building by height and volume in New Zealand.

    It is also the first student accommodation complex of its size to use pre-fabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels, which are up to 80% lighter than concrete – and 100% sustainable.

    Lead architect Hamish Muir, of Dunedin-based Mason & Wales, was “delighted” that the combined efforts of the client, consultants and contractors over a number of years have been recognised at a national level.

    “We are proud to have been involved in a project of such significant scale, quality and innovation in our home town.

    “Credit must go to Phil Ker and Philip Cullen [Chief Operating Officer, Otago Polytechnic] for having the original vision, combined with a genuine focus on environmentally sustainable design initiatives, and the determination to see it through.

    “They have raised the bar for student accommodation at a local, national and international level.”

    Ian McKie, Director, Naylor Love Dunedin, says the award is “fantastic recognition for the team involved in this innovative and challenging project”.

    “It’s a project we all will be proud of for years to come.

    “The building was completed following the principles of the Living Building Challenge. CLT went a long way to meeting the materials requirement.”

    There was also very low waste, McKie notes, adding the CLT structure had to satisfy sustainability criteria without adding extra costs.

    Project manager Sam Cadden, of Logic Group, says Otago Polytechnic’s driving philosophy was to create a sustainable student accommodation block.

    “This vision was a major contributor for the material choices made from foundations and structure to carpet and paint finishes.”

    The innovative design, construction processes and building materials used in Te Pā Tauira have also been recognised with several nominations in the 2018 NZ Wood-Resene Timber Design Awards, the winners of which will be announced in August.

    The 231-bed furnished residential village opened its doors to students in February, and was officially opened by the Hon Dr David Clark on 1 June. 

    Just a short walk from campus and Dunedin’s city centre, Te Pā Tauira offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    The name Te Pā Tauira was gifted by Ōtākou Rūnaka in 2017, along with each of the names for the five floors – Hawea, Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu (these are names of the southern tribes who have migrated to the South Island over centuries).

    Read the story behind the storeys

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira

  • Distinguished Alumni Awards (May 18 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards, held last week, marked a coming together of people with a passion.

    The 16-strong list of nominees ranged from Commonwealth Games stars, to internationally recognised artists, from business high-fliers to community movers and shakers.

    They included ceramic artist Chris Weaver, fast-rising painter Holly Zandbergen, inspirational fashion designer Abby van Schreven, award-winning nursing specialist Marianne Te Tau, visionary McDonald’s franchise owner Justin Stonelake, Women’s Refuge support worker Kerri Oliver and youth advocate Faanimo Elisara-To’o.

    The sports world was well-represented by New Zealand stars Kelly Brazier (Rugby Sevens), javelin ace Holly Robinson, Dunedin-based athletics coach Raylene Bates and New Zealand rugby sevens legend DJ Forbes.

    Visit our Alumni page to view the full list of 2018 Distinguished Alumni.

  • Learners to benefit from Otago Polytechnic-DVML deal (March 27 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic and Dunedin Venues Management Limited have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that will provide Otago learners with important, real-world work experiences.

    To be announced at a ceremony at Forsyth Barr Stadium at 3pm today [Tuesday 27 March], the MOU will result in Otago Polytechnic’s learners engaging in a range of paid internships and casual, voluntary placements, including on-the-ground experience in sports turf management, events management and hospitality.

    Learners in Otago Polytechnic’s New Zealand Certificate in Horticulture Services (Sports Turf) programme will be offered fixed-term paid internships with DVML (up to four per year). These will include working at international sporting venues such as Forsyth Barr Stadium and the University of Otago Oval.

    In addition, DVML experts will provide tutoring for learners and host field day experiences directly related to the programme, which is based at Otago Polytechnic’s Cromwell campus and is the only full-time sports turf programme on offer in New Zealand. 

    The MOU also bolsters the strong relationship between DVML and Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Applied Management programme, which has previously resulted in several graduates gaining full-time roles within DVML’s events management team.

    Dunedin Venues will provide tutoring for learners along with a range of paid and voluntary placements, including in marketing, events management, and hospitality and catering.

    DVML venues host around 500 events a year. These range from world-class concerts and international sporting fixtures at Forsyth Barr Stadium, performances at the Dunedin Town Hall, conferences at the Dunedin Centre, to events such as the Dunedin Craft Beer & Food Festival and Great Kiwi Home and Living Show.

    Dunedin Venues Chief Executive Terry Davies: “DVML is excited to be working with Otago Polytechnic, providing opportunities for its students to be exposed to all aspects of our business with a focus on event management, hospitality, and turf development. 

    “We have already had the advantage of employing Otago Polytechnic graduates in event coordination. This mutually beneficial partnership is a fantastic opportunity for our staff to pass on their wealth of experience and, in fact, also learn from the students.”

    Otago Polytechnic Chief Executive Phil Ker says the relationship is another example of the institution empowering its learners with real skills in real environments.

    “As well as preparing learners with the ability to adapt in what can be fast-moving situations, the MOU is another reminder of our commitment not only to Dunedin but the wider community.”

    *The MOU between Otago Polytechnic and DVML will be announced at a ceremony at Forsyth Barr Stadium at 3pm today [Tuesday 27 March].

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s NZ Certificate in Horticulture Services (Sports Turf)

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Applied Management

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s Hospitality Management programmes

     

  • The story behind Te Pā's storeys (February 25 2018)

    It might be brand-new, but Te Pā Tauira-Otago Polytechnic Student Village has connections that reach back through generations.

    The names for each level of Te Pā Tauira – Hawea, Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu – were inspired by a diary extract written by Hori Kerei (“H.K.”) Taiaroa.

    Born in the 1830s, H.K. was the son of Te Matenga Taiaroa, an important chief at Ōtākou whose name has been enshrined in the Otago Peninsula place name, Taiaroa Heads.   

    In one of his more personal diary extracts, written in Māori, H.K detailed looking at a midden as he was walking along the beach at Taumutu.

    He described each layer of the midden, starting with the old embers of a fire in the earth and then dog bones, fish bones and cockleshells.

    He stated that the reason he knew the midden was from the two tribes that preceded Kāi Tahu – namely Waitaha and Kāti Māmoe – was because of the depth of the layered materials.

    Reflecting H.K.’s thoughts, each level of Te Pā Tauira, which opened on 11 February, has been named as if the building were a midden.

    Hawea, the name of the ground floor, refers to the oldest tribe in the southern Ngāi Tahu rohe (area). Moving up through each level offers a chronological reference to the subsequent tribal inhabitants: Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu. 

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira

  • A chance to support Wildlife Hospital (February 16 2018)

    Keen to get stuck in and help the Wildlife Hospital? Want to know more?

    Come along to Orientation Week, when the Wildlife Hospital Students’ Association (WHSA) will be recruiting new volunteers to support the facility which, since opening in January, has treated dozens of injured birds, including a rare takahe.

    On Thursday February 22 (Clubs Day), WHSA members will be joined by two Pulse Energy Highlanders players on the Otago Museum Reserve (unless it is awful weather, in which case it will be inside the University Link) from 10am-3pm.

    Come along to the WHSA tent and join in the chance to play games, compete against others students and win spot prizes, including coffee and food vouchers donated by AllPress, Vogel St Kitchen and the Good Earth, as well as passes to Orokonui Ecosanctuary.

    And rugby (and wildlife) fans take note – signed Highlanders merchandise will be given away, too! That’s because the Highlanders have formed a community partnership with the Wildlife Hospital.

    As well as putting up posters around Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago, WHSA executive members will be easily to spot in their Wildlife Hospital T-shirts.

    They’re a friendly bunch and welcome anyone to approach them with questions. 

    Read more about the Wildlife Hospital

     

  • Teaching vineyard to become Pinot Noir showcase (October 31 2017)

    As part of a joint collaboration to showcase Riversun Nursery’s Pinot Noir varieties, this week Otago Polytechnic Viticulture students are planting 240 Pinot Noir grapevines in the polytech’s Cromwell vineyard.

    Certificate in Horticulture (level 4) and Diploma in Viticulture (level 5) students gain valuable hands-on experience throughout the courses on the Central Campus 1ha vineyard located in Bannockburn Road, Cromwell.  

    With Central Otago’s success in producing some of NZ’s very best Pinot Noir wines, Riversun’s viticulturist Nick Hoskins and Distance Education Coordinator, Rachel Petrie from the Cromwell Campus, saw an opportunity over twelve months ago to utilise four empty rows on the polytech’s teaching vineyard. 

    “After hearing Nick Hoskins speak at a Central Otago Winegrowers (COWA) event in October 2016, I approached Riversun to see if they were in need of any land to trial Pinot Noir rootstocks or clones here in Central Otago,” said Rachel.

    Riversun jumped at the chance to give students the opportunity to learn, while giving the company access to information on clonal performance in New Zealand’s largest Pinot Noir district.

    “Local growers will also be able to see how the variety acts in an Otago setting versus how it acts here in our source block in Gisborne which is a completely different climate / terroir,” said Nick.

    Recommending 3309 rootstock for its popularity in the New Zealand wine industry, in 2016 Riversun grafted 240 vines from a combination of twelve old and new clones including those from the ENTAV-INRA® importation programme. After ten months in the Riversun field nursery, 240 Pinot Noir traditional vines were transported to Central Otago in early October this year. A further 48 two year old SuperVines will be supplied in 2018.

    The Pinot Noir planting fits in with the diploma teaching programme for irrigation setup and pruning and down the track students will also be looking at yield, bunch data, brix and management.  Students are responsible for the planting and care of the vines through to the first harvest and beyond for future students trusted with their care.

    The main aim of the collaboration is to forge long term partnerships between education and industry by connecting future employers, growers and viticulturists with future talent and employees.

    The vineyard is often a location for COWA (Central Otago Winegrowers Association) workshops and events including the young viticulturist competition and there are discussions around opportunities to develop clone comparison trials, small batch tastings and local grower field days in the future.

    Riversun is New Zealand’s premium supplier of top-quality certified grapevines grafted to the New Zealand Winegrowers Grafted Grapevine Standard. Established in 1982, Riversun has forged strong alliances with the New Zealand wine industry and is home to over 200 varieties and clones from some of the world’s great wine-producing regions and access to the biggest, best selection of grapevine clones and varieties in the world with a 25-year exclusive licence (signed in 2002) with the French government clonal selection agency ENTAV.

    See more about Horticulture programmes

    See more about Viticulture programmes

    For more information on Riversun Nursery’s Pinot Noir varieties and clones:
    http://www.riversun.co.nz/grapevines/varieties-and-clones/#varietal-216

    For more information on ENTAV-INRA ® clones and varietal creations:
    http://www.vignevin.com/entav-inra.html

  • Brewing up a qualification (February 21 2017)

    Otago Polytechnic Central Campus in Cromwell is planning a new programme in brewing beer.

    Marketing Manager, Melanie Kees, says the new qualification would begin when Central Campus' new purpose-built facility is completed in about three years.

    Ms Kees believes it would be the first qualification of its type in the country - adding to Central Campus' mantra of offering unique experience in a unique place.

    "Why would you want to be anywhere else?"

    Read about the brewing qualification in the news.

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic Central Campus.