Otago Polytechnic

2021 Midwifery Postgraduate Courses


Courses are 15 credits (approx.150 hours) except for those with * which are 30 credits (approx. 300 hours)


Postgraduate Diploma Courses


 

Preceptorship for Midwives

15 Feb to 2 Apr 2021

Course Coordinator: TBC

This course invites midwives to explore and develop their understanding of preceptorship in midwifery. A variety of theoretical concepts will be explored around notions of power, ownership of knowledge, transmission of knowledge, support and professionalism within the preceptorship relationship. These concepts will be applied in the context of frameworks for professional practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

Indicative content:

  • Theories and models of preceptorship.
  • Adult learning theory.
  • Socio-political context of midwifery education, midwifery practice, and the midwifery profession in New Zealand.
  • Professional framework for midwifery practice in New Zealand with regards to preceptorship
  • Overview of theories relating to power, ownership and transmission of knowledge in relation to preceptorship.
  • Analysis of potential barriers and enablers to establishing positive relationships with student midwives, women, colleagues and lecturers.
  • Assessment of student midwives’ needs. 
  • Exploration of various skills and teaching tools and the impact of these on the mentoring process, including:
    • learning contracts
    • setting objectives/goals
    • clinical skills teaching
    • clinical supervision
    • making assessments
    • self assessment
    • story telling
    • debriefing
    • giving feedback
    • receiving feedback
    • report writing.
  • Using evidence in practice
  • Conflict resolution and negotiation skills development.
  • Reflective practice

Exploring Maternal Obesity: Clinical and Critical Perspectives

15 Feb to 2 Apr 2021

Course Coordinator: Jade Wratten 

This course aims to enhance midwives’ understanding of the relationship between body weight and health relevant for midwifery practice in Aotearoa. Midwives undertaking this course will gain knowledge of epidemiological data about obesity along with clinical and practice issues associated with a high BMI in pregnancy.

Midwives will also have the opportunity to explore and evaluate the critical literature that complicates and challenges maternal obesity discourse. Students will further strengthen and develop their role as midwives by using an evidenced based and woman centred approach to maternal body eight and health in Aotearoa.

Indicative content:

  • Epidemiology of obesity and maternal obesity in Aotearoa and internationally.
  • Risk and obesity.
  • Pathophysiology of maternal obesity.
  • Epigenetics
  • Communicating risk. 
  • Tolerable risk.
  • Clinical issues for midwives
  • Bias, stigma and activism
  • Health at every size (HAES) and other women-centred health promotion models
  • Pathophysiology of Women’s experiences of obesity.
  • The role of the midwife.

Climate Change, Health and Birth

15 Feb to 2 Apr 2021

Course Coordinator: Tricia Thompson 

The aim of this course is to critically analyse the health impacts of climate change particularly in relation to pregnancy and birth.

Indicative content:

  • The science of climate change, global warming and extreme weather
  • Climate change and health
  • Climate change and health equity
  • Climate change and vector borne diseases
  • Climate change, maternal health, and pregnancy outcomes
  • Climate change and its impact on small island developing states
  • Climate change and migration
  • Sustainability, women and birth
  • Midwifery as a sustainable health profession

Working with Tangata Whenua: Building Equity in Maternity Care

26 Apr to 11 Jun 2021

Course Coordinator: Jade Wratten 

This course aims to assist midwives to examine issues of equity within the provision of maternity care. The course allows advanced exploration of health disparities and racism within maternity care in Aotearoa – focusing on Māori.

A range of evidence will be explored which links outcomes of maternity care to the ability of women and families to equitably access and engage with care, and strategies to promote improved equity in care provision will be explored, including enhancing the application of Turanga Kaupapa in midwifery practice.

Indicative content:

  • Tūranga Kaupapa – effective application of principles in daily practice
  • Examination of current literature exploring equity issues in maternity
  • Personal reflection about responses to equity issues in midwifery
  • Understanding racism, and how it might contribute to inequity
  • Understanding bias: implicit, explicit and affinity bias
  • Māori health models, tuakana teina relationships
  • Positive actions to address inequity – Wai 2575
  • Te reo for midwifery practice

Hypertension in Pregnancy

26 Apr to 11 Jun 2021

Course Coordinator: Jade Wratten 

This course aims to enhance midwives’ understanding of the patho-physiology of hypertensions in pregnancy and to explore clinical issues applicable to midwives in Aotearoa. Midwives undertaking this course will gain a sound understanding of the physiological implications of hypertensive disorders for the childbearing woman and baby.

With this enhanced understanding and knowledge of current evidence, midwives successfully completing this course will be able to use an evidence based approach to appropriately work with women regarding hypertension in pregnancy and participate confidently as part of a collaborative team caring for women diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder.

Indicative content:

  • Cardiovascular and renal systems o Changes to the physiology of these systems brought about by pregnancy
  • Epidemiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy
  • Risk factors for hypertensive disorders in pregnancy
  • Screening tests for hypertension in pregnancy o interpreting and understanding clinical tests
    • evidence for screening approaches
  • Pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders o Chronic hypertension
    • Gestational hypertension/ Pregnancy induced hypertension
    • Pre eclampsia
    • Eclampsia
    • HELLP syndrome
  • Signs and symptoms of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy
  • Management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, labour and puerperium
  • The midwifery role.

Queering Midwifery: Sexuality, Gender and Sex Characteristic Diversity

26 Apr – 11 Jun 2021

Course Coordinator: George Parker 

The purpose of this course is to support midwives to provide culturally safe midwifery care to people across the spectrum of diverse sexualities, gender identities, and sex characteristics (e.g. intersex people).

The course takes a norm critical approach, supporting learners to recognise and question the norms about sexuality, gender identity, and sexed bodies, that operate in maternity care and their effects on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, takatāpui, intersex, queer (LGBTIQ+ Takatāpui) people.

Participants will explore a range of models for understanding health inequities for LGBTIQ+ Takatāpui people and will be supported to reflect on specific practice settings and scenarios in order to develop strategies for supporting and promoting rainbow inclusion and diversity in their midwifery practice and in maternity care more generally.

Indicative content:

  • The diversity of family formation and conception methods including access to fertility care for LGBTIQ+ Takatāpui people and DIY conception methods
  • Queer 101: Key concepts and terminology for understanding sexuality, gender identity, and sex characteristic (intersex) diversity
  • The diversity of family formation and conception methods including access to fertility care for LGBTTIQ+ people and DIY conception methods
  • Models for understanding health inequities for LGBTTIQ+ people including norm criticism, minority stress, cultural safety, and intersectionality
  • Barriers and enablers to safe, quality, culturally safe maternity care for LGBTTIQ+ people including homophobia/transphobia and heteronormativity/cisnormativity
  • Midwifery care for trans masculine and non-binary people
  • The midwife’s role in the identification and care of intersex infants
  • Strategies for promoting and supporting rainbow inclusion and diversity in midwifery practice and maternity care

Midwives and Reproductive Justice

12 Jul to 27 Aug 2021

Course Coordinator: George Parker 

The aim of this course is to explore the significance of contemporary social and political struggles over women’s reproductive bodies for midwifery, and midwives’ role in the protection and promotion of reproductive human rights.

The paper will investigate a range of contemporary examples, both in Aotearoa New Zealand and internationally, in which women’s reproductive autonomy (the power to decide and control contraceptive use, pregnancy, and childbirth) is under threat. Movements and actions to secure women’s reproductive human rights will be explored focusing on the specific contribution of midwifery, both at a practice and knowledge level.

Learners will be encouraged to critically engage with concepts of rights, autonomy and consent in relation to specific midwifery professional and practice issues and identify strategies for embedding a reproductive justice framework in their work.

Indicative content:

  • Midwives’ role in access to contraception and family planning
  • Midwives’ role in abortion access and care
  • Ultrasonography, fetal personhood, and the criminalisation of pregnancy
  • Policing or promoting health in pregnancy? Midwives role in maternal health promotion
  • Midwifery care of women following female genital modification and female genital cosmetic surgery
  • Vulnerable pregnancies and state enforced child up-lift
  • Midwives’ role in identification and care of reproductive coercion and other forms of intimate partner violence related to pregnancy
  • Reproductive technologies and surrogacy
  • Medicalisation, obstetric violence, and the limitations of informed consent
  • Struggles for midwifery autonomy – national and global perspectives
  • Midwifery, intersectionality and reproductive justice
  • Midwifery philosophy of care and feminist relational autonomy– reimagining body autonomy, rights, and consent

Political and Practical Challenges to Breastfeeding

12 Jul to 27 Aug 2021

Course Coordinator: Yvonne Mosley-Martin 

The aim of this course is enable participants to critically analyse the political/social context of breastfeeding, identifying strategies for change, and to demonstrate advanced knowledge of the management of wāhine and pēpē complex breastfeeding challenges, to promote exclusive breastfeeding continuity.

Indicative content:

  • discussion and review of statistics about breastfeeding initiation, and exclusive breastfeeding continuation in Aotearoa/New Zealand,
  • breastfeeding strategies for Aotearoa/New Zealand.
  • exploration of the social, historical, and political contexts of breastfeeding for the wāhine and whānau, identifying strategies for change.relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and health of wāhine and pēpē
  • critical analysis of breastfeeding in women of varying ethnicity, age, socio-economic status, cultural groups and demographics;
  • breastfeeding: the global perspective;
  • impact of labour and birthing practises on breastfeeding establishment and early breastmilk production
  • complex breastfeeding challenges and the underlying associated wāhine and/or pēpē pathophysiology;
  • evidence based practice for the assessment and management of complex breastfeeding challenges, to promote exclusive breastfeeding continuity

Infant Mental Health

12 Jul to 27 Aug 2021

Course Coordinator: Tricia Thompson 

The aim of this course is to enable learners to explore infant mental health and expand their competency to promote the wellbeing of infants, young children and their families in order to promote optimum infant mental health.

Indicative content:

  • key concepts relating to attachment, parent-child interactions and relationships with others;
  • infant social and emotional development and learning;
  • behavioural and emotional wellbeing and regulation;
  • sleep and feeding patterns;
  • circle of security;
  • neural pathways, myelination, and stress response in infants;
  • perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH);

Applied Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives

20 Sep to 5 Nov 2021

Course Coordinator: Sally Baddock 

The aim of this course is to enable learners to explore, interpret and apply current understanding of anatomy and physiology as it relates to midwifery practice.

Indicative content:

  • key concepts relating to the physiology of conception and implantation, placental development and function, embryological and fetal development;
  • maternal physiological changes in pregnancy, labour & birth, the puerperium and lactation and the hormonal regulation of these changes;
  • neonatal physiological adaptations to the extrauterine environment;
  • pathophysiology of complications of pregnancy, labour & birth and/or the puerperium and the consequences for mother and baby;
  • common infectious diseases and substances affecting pregnancy, labour & birth and/or the puerperium and the consequences for mother and baby.

Diabetes in Pregnancy

Sep 20 to Nov 5 2021

Course Coordinator: Karen Wakelin 

The aim of this course is to enhance midwives’ understanding of the patho-physiology of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy. Midwives will gain a sound understanding of the physiological implications of the disorder for the childbearing woman and baby, and knowledge of current evidence informing practice. Midwives successfully completing this course will be able to use an evidence-based approach to appropriately screen for diabetes in pregnancy and participate confidently as part of a collaborative team caring for women diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.

Indicative content:

  • Changes to metabolism and the endocrine system brought about by pregnancy
  • Epidemiology of diabetes in New Zealand
  • Risk factors for diabetes
  • Interpreting and understanding screening tests for diabetes
  • Pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Gestational diabetes
    • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy
  • Midwifery role in the management of diabetes in pregnancy, labour and puerperium

Global midwifery: Practical Steps

20 Sep to 5 Nov 2021

Course Coordinator: Tricia Thompson 

The aim of this course is to enhance the capacity of midwives to work in a global context. Students will explore the different roles of longer-term strategic development of global midwifery capacity through education programmes and regulation; and the shorter term global midwifery response during disasters and emergency contexts.

Indicative content

The content of this course develops on and builds from the content of the prerequisite course, Global Midwifery and Safe Motherhood.

  • Analysis of the legislation and regulation of midwifery that makes safe motherhood possible.
  • Effective programmes to prepare midwife teachers.
  • Appropriate midwifery curriculum and syllabus for safe motherhood.
  • Educational programmes to strengthen midwives ability to manage midwifery emergencies.
  • Standards and midwifery competencies to improve midwifery practice.
  • Monitoring and assessment for continued competency for midwifery practice.
  • Developing midwifery capacity for the promotion of maternal and new-born health and wellbeing.
  • Exploration of the role of midwives during disasters and humanitarian emergencies.
  • Professional and personal skills required to work in global midwifery contexts, and how to develop those skills.

Postgraduate Diploma Courses


 

Pathway to Thesis: Midwifery Knowledge*

15 Feb to 11 June 2021

Course Coordinator: George Parker 

This course aims to identify and explore the discipline-specific knowledge base of midwifery. Through a critical historical analysis of midwifery literature and practices students will explore the ways in which knowledge informs practice, the ways in which knowledge is generated and the implications this has for the future of the profession.

A strong emphasis will be on examination of the unique contribution New Zealand midwifery is making to the knowledge base of midwifery worldwide. This includes critique of the social, political, cultural and organisational constraints and opportunities that influence the development of midwifery in Aotearoa New Zealand and the ways in which the competing discourses of midwifery and obstetrics are being played out.

Indicative content:

  • Exploration of the ontological and epistemological foundations and assumptions of empiricism, interpretivism, feminism, poststructuralism and other critical traditions, and non-western and indigenous epistemologies;
  • Midwifery knowledge development, past and present; the historical, socio-political and cultural contexts of knowledge generation;
  • Theory development in midwifery and its relationship with practice;
  • Frameworks for midwifery practice; application of theory to practice;
  • The development of midwifery as a profession in Aotearoa New Zealand and internationally;
  • Competing knowledge paradigms, midwifery and medicine and the impact on women's experiences of childbirth and midwifery practice;
  • Aotearoa New Zealand midwifery’s contribution to the discipline; midwifery as a relationship; midwives and women in partnership; autonomy and its impact on women's experiences and childbirth outcomes; developing practice wisdom;
  • Midwifery knowledge generation – the way forward.

Pathway to Thesis: Midwifery Research Methodologies*

(12 Jul – 5 Nov 2021)

Course Coordinator: Suzanne Miller 

This course is available to Registered Midwives undertaking the Postgraduate Diploma, as a prelude to Masters level study. It is a 30 credit course which equates to approximately 300 study hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an opportunity to gain an understanding of various methodological approaches, research methods and the research process including consideration of ethical, cultural and budgetary issues.

Participants will be supported to develop a research proposal which demonstrates congruency between research question, aims, methodology and methods, and meets the ethical and cultural requirements of the New Zealand research context.

Indicative content:

  • advanced skills to critique research reports, articles and presentations which include appraisal and evaluation in terms of the knowledge paradigm they draw on, and the relevance for midwifery practice;
  • in-depth examination of different research methodologies and the associated issues and strategies surrounding the quality and status of research studies and the knowledge claims that can be made;
  • debate on the complexities of ethical considerations which relate to different research approaches and contexts;
  • identification of practice-based research questions which are guided by critical analysis and relevant research literature;
  • development of a research proposal for a practice-based research question which includes a justified choice of methodology;
  • evaluation of the role of midwifery research and theory in the provision of quality health services within the socio-cultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand;
  • critical reflection on the role of inquiry/research approaches for personal practice, professional judgement and the future of the midwifery profession.

Complex Care Pathway

Choose these TWO courses PLUS one course from the Postgraduate Certificate course list.


 

Midwifery Assessment and Decision Making for Complexity

15 Feb to 11 Jun 2021

Course Coordinator: TBC

To provide the opportunity for midwives to research skills in assessment and monitoring for women and their babies, when a woman is experiencing illness or alteration to the normal physiology of childbirth.

Indicative content:

  • Knowledge of monitoring, assessment and management skills for areas of complexity in childbearing.
  • Directed and self-directed learning of the treatment and management of disease processes impacting on pregnancy, childbearing and the puerperium including assessment, diagnosis, interventions and on-going monitoring.
  • Discussion of strategies to maintain a ‘woman focus’, and advocating role for women experiencing complex health challenges in childbirth.

Midwifery Practicum for Complexity

12 Jul to 5 Nov 2021

Course Coordinator: TBC

To provide the opportunity for midwives to research skills in assessment and monitoring for women and their babies, when a woman is experiencing illness or alteration to the normal physiology of childbirth. This course contains a 100 hour practicum, which is funded for your locum (if you are an LMC) or for backfill at your facility (if you are a core midwife).

Indicative content:

  • Reflect, analyse and develop personal learning pathway and outcomes to be achieved negotiated in a learning contract
  • Participate in practice placement(s) where the midwife can learn the practical skills of diagnosis, treatment, management, and on-going monitoring, for the particular area of complexity or disease processes impacting on pregnancy, childbearing and the puerperium selected for study.
  • Reflect on learning achieved during placements with reference to the midwife’s personal practice environment.