Otago Polytechnic

Archive for 2018

Events

  • Parents' and Whānau Information Evening - Tuesday 23 October (Sep 13 2018)

    Is your son, daughter or member of your whānau looking to study at tertiary level? Not sure what their options are or the journey they are about to embark on?

    Come along to our Parents' and Whānau information evening

    Regardless of what stage your son, daughter or whānau member is at in deciding where to study – this evening is for all parents and whānau who are wanting to help make an informed decision about their education options and the unique and successful learning environment we offer.

    Find out about our support services, how our career pathways can work for every learner (and a range of NCEA scores), available scholarships, the success stories of our students and graduates, and how our Level 7 qualifications are the same as a university degree. Our Heads of Colleges and their representatives will be available to speak about the programmes they deliver and you can talk to our students about their study experiences. Our support staff can also answer any questions you might have about our learning support services, fees and careers guidance.

    Let us show you how Otago Polytechnic all adds up at this informative evening:

    Tuesday 23 October
    The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street
    5.30pm to 7.00pm (presentation from 5.45pm to 6.15pm)

     

  • Product Design Open Day and Information Evening - Tuesday 2 October (Sep 10 2018)

    Want to develop meaningful products that improve the way we live? Looking for a career in NZ’s leading industry sector?

    Study Product Design 

    Product Design is an exciting, ever-evolving profession focused on designing objects and systems to improve the way we live. It is a fun and dynamic industry to work in – and products designed in New Zealand are our country’s highest export earner!

    With our Bachelor of Design (Product) you will gain an international qualification that will give you skills in conceptualisation, drawing, model-making, CAD software, graphic design and production methods. You will also enjoy hands-on learning through internships, project partnerships, industry experience and international exchanges.

     

    Open Day

    Tuesday 2 October
    11.00am to 2.00pm

    Includes overview, workshop and studio tour, portfolio review/pre-approval and lunch.

    RSVP to Pam.Hodgkinson@op.ac.nz by 28 September (late bookings will be accepted if places are available)

     

    Information Evening

    Tuesday 2 October
    4.30pm to 6.00pm

    Drop in anytime to talk to staff about our range degree, bridging options and postgraduate programmes.

  • Engineering Technology Careers Expo - Wednesday 17 October (Oct 17 2018)

    Engineering Technology Careers Expo

    Want a career in Engineering?

    Come along to our Engineering Technology careers expo! With our region about to embark on one of its biggest building booms, the construction industry now has a demand for qualified Engineer Technicians and Technologists to work in the areas of civil, mechanical and electrical engineering. If you have ever considered a career in engineering this is an expo not to be missed.

    Representatives from Fisher & Paykel, Scope Group and Switchbuild will provide an overview of the engineering industry and our staff will be available to discuss the best study options for you – from bridging options to degree studies.

    Wednesday 17 October
    5.30pm to 6.30pm
    The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street

    Find out more about our Engineering programmes >

  • OPEN DAY AND WORKSHOPS: DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART (Aug 03 2018)

    25 AUGUST 2018, 10AM - 3PM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART
    OPEN DAY AND FREE WORKSHOPS



    The Dunedin School of Art is offering FREE workshop experiences in their world-class facilities for Open Day.

    If you’d like to try out a specific technique, or are interested in what they get up to, please come along.
    The workshops are suitable for anyone - no prior experience required. Registration is NOT required ALL WELCOME.

    Studio workshops include: > Ceramics > Drawing > Painting > Photography > Jewellery & Metalsmithing > Printmaking > Textiles

    Tours of the school will be available during the Open Day. For those interested in studying in 2019, bring along copies of your artwork or portfolio to discuss with school staff a provisional placement for 2019.

    For more information:
    artadmin@op.ac.nz
    0800 762 786 or
    www.op.ac.nz/art

     

    Full Programme below:

    The Dunedin School of Art Open day is an opportunity for anyone to visit our world class workshop facilities, to see what goes on, explore our studios and gain a sense of our creative community. Workshop activities and materials are free. There is no need to register, please come along any time during our open hours and join in on one or all of the workshop activities.

    • Clive Humphreys will give a talk in the lecture room 10.30am – 11.00am.
    • Tours of the Dunedin School of Art will take place throughout the day


    Studio Workshop Activities
    Ceramics. “Have a go on the wheel” with Rob Cloughley. Tours of the Ceramic Studio, demos & some basic tuition on making with clay. Here is an opportunity to have a go making work on the pottery wheel. At 12 noon we will demonstrate the Raku firing process. Raku is a Japanese process that involves opening the kiln up while red hot to take the work out.
    Drawing. “Observational Drawing” with Michele Beevors and Kiri Mitchell. Have a go at drawing still life with charcoal and an eraser. Also try the concept of creating a blind contour drawing.
    Digital Photography “Lighting Studio” with Frank Pawluk and Stephen Hillman. Explore 3 point lighting setup for video and photography stills. Utilise the cameras to shoot low key portraits or video a self-promo.
    Jewellery and Metalsmithing. “3D Printed Jewellery” with Brendon Monson and Andrew Last. Customise a ring or pendant using simple CAD software, 3D print the Jewellery and cast it in pewter using the Delft Clay technique.
    Painting. “Painting in Miniature” with Anita De Soto, Graham Fletcher and Michael Greaves. You may discover skills that you never knew you had. Learn an easy way to achieve instant results.
    Photography. “Partake in a photography experience under the red light” with Rachel Allan. Create a photographic drawing in the darkroom
    Printmaking. “Etching Workshop” with Neil Emmerson and Marion Wassenaar. Introduction to the intaglio process of dry point etching on clear plastic. This involves inking and printing works on paper through the etching press.
    Textiles “Textile Screen Printing” with Victoria Bell. Come and explore screen printing with pre-made photo-stencil screens and paper stencils, in our Textiles Workshop. Fabric supplied. Come play with colour and cloth, using provided designs or free-hand paper cut outs.


    Postgraduate Study Information Session 11.00am - 12.00noon with Alex Kennedy. Postgraduate study provides the opportunity to develop as an art practitioner as you develop a deeper understanding through practical- and theory-based research. Choose to study at the Dunedin School of Art and enter into a lively and challenging environment where you will benefit from the nationally unique workshop facilities, a focus on individual supervision and the expertise of lecturers who have a diverse range of approaches and understandings in the Visual Arts.


    Thinking of applying to study at the Dunedin School of Art in 2019?
    Staff will be available to discuss application entry requirements for our art programmes, assist with your portfolio preparation and your application. We are now offering provisional placements in our programmes for 2019 if your work clearly meets our entry criteria. Bring along samples of your art work and discuss this option

  • Otago Polytechnic Science in Action Day - part of the International Science Festival (May 31 2018)

    Tuesday 10 July / 9.00am – 4.30pm / Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin /  $10 (includes lunch)


     

    Otago Polytechnic Science in Action Day
    Part of the International Science Festival

    At Otago Polytechnic we create amazing careers that apply science to the real world.
    This fun and interactive day is the perfect opportunity for students aged 13-16 years to explore the exciting science behind the careers we offer in a range of our renowned programmes.

    Students will have a fun interactive day getting involved with a large range of science activities including:

    • Operating a robot
    • Analyse a sports match with sports analytics
    • Fly the latest sports drone
    • Perform CPR on a simulator
    • Information Technology projects including virtual reality, wireless sensors, robotic arms
    • 3D Printing and Animation Design
    • Making and launching paper air rockets
    • Interactive food activities

    To book your place click here >

  • Powerful Assessment (Oct 16 2018)

    Geoff Scott's Workshop: Powerful Assessment

    Get in quick for tickets to the Dunedin session, Thursday 25 October, 9am - 12 noon. Limited numbers!

     

    Why bother giving focus to powerful assessment?

    We know from three decades’ research and experience in post-secondary and higher education that, for the majority of students, assessment drives learning and that much of what students learn comes from what is assessed. We also know that assessment is often poorly managed.

    During the workshop we will discuss how higher educators around the world are successfully using the Powerful Assessment section of the FLIPCurric site to ensure that they are ‘assessing less but assessing better’.

     

    Who is Geoff Scott?


    Dr Geoff Scott is Emeritus Professor of Higher Education and Sustainability at Western Sydney University, Australia.

    He is a widely published author of reports and articles on change leadership, sustainability, professional capability, and what distinguishes successful early career graduates in a wide range of professions. 

    From 2014-16 he was a National Senior Teaching Fellow with Australia’s Office for Learning and Teaching focusing on how best to develop highly capable, work ready plus graduates.

    That work resulted in the creation of http://flipcurric.edu.au/

  • Blends of Talent on Project Teams (Oct 11 2018)

    Join us for the next SiMBA research talk:


    TUESDAY 23 OCTOBER, 12 - 1.00PM
    D317, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    Our speaker is Dr Steve Atkins, on the topic Modern HR and Post-Postmodern Metrics for Seeking Blends of Talents on Project Teams.

    This SiMBA research talk will summarize audience engagements and conference corridor debates (across 2018 conferences in Bonn, Sheffield, Montreal, Toronto and Rome) re moving vocational talent-matching advice from modern to post-postmodern technologies.  Two contexts of application will illustrate these ideas: the young New Zealand spacecraft engineering/space-launch sector and the global “war-on-unsafe-water” arena (…the latter, e.g, co-funded by Rotary International, UNICEF, USAid, Cirque de Soleil’s OneDrop Foundation, etc.). This talk will be a bit of a travelogue as well, since some patches of holiday-leave had to be used to patch five conferences together into one airfare (e.g., Northern Ireland, Dublin, St. Petersburg, Copenhagen, Oslo, and Estonia). 

     Listening, in advance, to this very recent Kim Hill/National RadioNZ interview (of Assoc.Prof. Merv Emre), will likely lead you to come to this SiMBA applied-research café with some tough questions for Steve, and with more appreciation for what we mean by “Post-Postmodernists” versus “pre-Rafaelites.”

     

     

  • China's Belt and Road Initiative (Oct 01 2018)

    Come and hear about the implications for vocational education of China's Belt and Road Initiative.


    TUESDAY 16 OCTOBER 2018, 4.30 - 6.00PM
    OTARU ROOM, DUNEDIN CITY COUNCIL, 50 THE OCTAGON, DUNEDIN
    REGISTER YOUR ATTENDANCE HERE


    This month we welcome visitors from Guangdong Construction Polytechnic. The Polytechnic president Zhao Pengfei (Gavin) is also the chairman of National Board for Advanced Apprenticeship Experters of Chinese Ministry of Education, the vice president of the Advanced Vocational Education Branch of China Vocational Education Association, and the vice chairman of Guangdong Vocational Education Alliance for the Belt and Road Initiative. The Belt and Road Initiative is a strategic foreign policy and economic strategy for China.

    Zhao Pengfei, the President of Guangdong Construction Polytechnic, has a PhD and is a second-level professor. Committed to the study of higher vocational education management, vocational education talent training mode and international talent cooperation training, Zhao Pengfei has hosted 11 national and provincial educational research projects, and published dozens of papers in core journals, many included by SCI. He has published four monographs, and won a first prize and a second prize of Chinese National Teaching Achievement, with two first prizes of teaching achievements in Guangdong Province.

     

  • Art Seminar programme - Term 4, 2018 (Oct 01 2018)

    THURSDAY 18 OCTOBER 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Unbound; Notes on an Exhibition

    Victoria Bell & Dr. Natalie Smith  (Curators)

    Unbound explores the fluidity of dress, bodies and sexualities through artist responses to Christine Webster’s BlackCarnival Series 1992 – 1994. The project coincides with Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium (21-24 Sept, 2018) co-hosted by The Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ) and The School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art at OP and is timed to celebrate the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New Zealand.

    Dr. Natalie Smith is a teaching fellow in the Department of Sociology, Gender and Social Work and an independent scholar.  Here research interests lie in the art – fashion nexus.  

    Victoria Bell is Undergraduate Programmes Coordinator and Studio Coordinator Textiles at The Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic. Her research touches upon postcolonialism, feminism, and the ethics of animal representation.

     

    THURSDAY 25 OCTOBER 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Post-cinematic Ontology and the Reversibility of the Flesh

    Kevin Fisher

    "In this presentation I argue that theorizations of the ontology of cinema reproduce what Heidegger describes as the tendency of Western metaphysics to mistake “ontic” questions about the objective existence of beings for properly “ontological” questions which concern the possibility for reflexive Being, or Dasein. My critique applies equally to accounts of analog and digital cinema insofar as both privilege determinations of ontology on the basis of the materiality or immateriality of the medial substrate. Instead, I propose that the conditions of ontology set forth by Heidegger are more fully realised in the cinema’s ability to enact the chiasmatic reversibility of subject and object in what Merleau-Ponty describes as the flesh of the world. I will show how, within the context of Sobchack’s description of film’s body, the chiasm of this reversibility is activated around the hinge of the cut and through the formal devices associated with it. As such, my approach reverses the longstanding association of ontology with the profilmic qualities of the indexical image, and disengages it from traditional understandings of media specificity. I’ll also suggest how this argument extends a minority position within film studies, which describes cinema ontology as a product of movement rather than representation."

    Dr Kevin Fisher is a Senior Lecturer in Media Film and Communication at the University of Otago. His research interests include film theory, phenomenology, documentary and genre studies. 

     

    THURSDAY 1 NOVEMBER 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Louise Menzies

    Louise Menzies is an Auckland-based artist and the 2018 Frances Hodgkins Fellow at the University of Otago. She has already established an outstanding body of work, including an impressive 15 solo exhibitions with showings in North America, Australia and Lithuania; contributions to group exhibitions in Los Angeles, Montreal, Paris, Rotterdam and Sydney; 12 art publication projects; and four significant residencies, three in international settings. Her practice embraces a range of media, including text, performance, moving image, photography, ceramics and print media, usually presented within installed environments. She draws particularly on research into the ways female experience has (or has not) been recorded – something she hopes to continue, by exploring histories of local artists including Joanna Paul and Frances Hodgkins, as a starting point.

    “As an artist you are always running a time deficit. Many more ideas enter the studio than there is the time and space to make them. The fellowship is a true gift in this sense, and the chance it offers to work in an extended way on one’s own artistic production is an immensely valuable opportunity.

  • Midwifery webinar (Oct 01 2018)

    Participate online in this Midwifery webinar.


    MONDAY 5 NOVEMBER, 1PM
    ONLINE VIA ADOBE CONNECT: CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE


    The presenter is Professor Sally Baddock, whose topic is Insights from the SIDS, Stillbirth and Baby Survival conference – Glasgow, 2018.

    Sally is co-Head of School for the School of Midwifery at Otago Polytechnic.

     

     

  • Otago Polytechnic & SIT 2018 Research Symposium (Oct 01 2018)

    Join us in Invercargill for this year's joint annual research symposium for Otago Polytechnic and the Southern Institute of Technology.


    MONDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2018, 9.30AM - 5.00PM
    SIT SEMINAR CENTRE (HANSEN HALL), TAY STREET, INVERCARGILL
    ATTENDANCE IS FREE BUT PLEASE CLICK HERE TO REGISTER


    This is an opportunity to share the varied and interesting research happening at Otago Polytechnic and SIT. There will be a wide range of 20-minute presentations from both institutions - see the programme below. For further information please contact Sally Bodkin-Allen at SIT. If you would like to share transport from Dunedin to Invercargill please contact Lesley Brook at Otago Polytechnic.

     

    Coffee        from 9:15 am                                            

    Opening/Karakia:  9:30 am

    Welcome by Dr Sally Bodkin-Allen, Research Manager, Southern Institute of Technology

    Session 1:  Te Taiao 9:40 – 10:40 am           Session chair: Sally Bodkin-Allen

    9:40 am

    Spatially mapping areas of water convergence to guide mitigation of farm contaminants in the Waituna Catchment

    Tapuwa Marapara, SIT

    10:00 am

    Let's do this! Engaging Invercargill locals with climate change action

    Anna Palliser, SIT

    10:20 am

    Folklore to reality? Global sea-level rise and the Maldivian “myth of extinction” 

    Christine Liang, SIT

    Morning tea: 10:40 – 11:00 am

    Session 2: Hangarau 11:00 am – 12:00 pm    Session chair: Lesley Brook

    11:00 am

    Enhancing students’ learning to solve word problems in thermodynamics based from Newman’s Error Analysis

    Carlo Gabriel, SIT

    11:20 am

    A framework for lean implementation in construction processes

    Nilmini Thilakarathna, OP

    11:40 am

    Is Bart Simpson offering sage advice to New Zealand farmers?

    Andy Ang, SIT

    Quick Break: 12:00-12:10pm


    Session 3:  Te Poutama 12:10 – 01:10 pm Session chair: Debbie Ruwhiu

    12:10 pm

    Expectations and perceptions of undergraduate study amongst Sport, Exercise & Health students (2014-2018)

    Simon Middlemas, Hazel Brown and Richard Humphries, OP

    12:30 pm

    Issues in transitioning STEM students from secondary school to engineering programmes at SIT

    Doug Rodgers, SIT

    12:50 pm

    Pilot of the Eyes Right Toolkit in secondary school

    Mary Butler, OP

    Lunch: 1:10 – 1:50 pm (Provided)

    Session 4:  Hauora 1:50 – 3:30 pm               Session chair: Sonja Swale

    1:50 pm

    The value of e-portfolios for transition nursing students 

    Karyn Madden, SIT

    2:10 pm

    Seeking clinical excellence through the implementation of an innovative peer coaching model in undergraduate nursing education.

    Rebecca McDiarmid and Donna Burkett, OP

    2:30 pm

    Assuming, playing, and de-roling as the patient! The commencement of a grounded theory study

    Jo Rhodes, SIT

    2:50 pm

    Longitudinal study examining the value of e-portfolios for students in an undergraduate nursing degree

    Karyn Madden, Lynda Harding, Katrina Bowes, SIT

    3:10 pm

    Cultural empathy – a comparison of levels of empathy between 1st year nursing students and 3rd year nursing students

    Cassie Carstensen and Jess Domigan, SIT

    Afternoon Tea: 3:30 – 3:50 pm


    Session 5:  Te Ao Hurihuri 3:50 – 05:10 pm   Session chair: Sally Bodkin-Allen

    3:50 pm

    Putting it to bed: Revising and completing a DIY feature film

    Patrick Gillies, SIT

    4:10 pm

    Analytic, descriptive and prescriptive components of evolving Jazz:  A new model based on the works of Brad Mehldau

    Mark Baynes, SIT

    4:30 pm

    The inherent uncertainty of money: A Quantum game approach

    Frederico Botafogo

    4:50pm

    The measurement problem: Beetles and cats in boxes

    Barnaby Pace, SIT/OP

    Voting for best presentation for the Audience Choice Award: 5:10 pm

    Presentation to ‘Audience Choice Award’ winner and final remarks:  5:20pm

    Dr Sally Bodkin-Allen, Research Manager, Southern Institute of Technology  

  • Artforms, Climate Change and the Anthropocene (Oct 01 2018)

    Bridie Lonie will give a talk at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery this month.


    WEDNESDAY 17 OCTOBER 2018, 10.30AM
    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY, THE OCTAGON, DUNEDIN


    Bridie Lonie is a lecturer at the Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic, and Emeritus Member of the Friends of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery. For this talk on the topic Artforms, Climate Change and the Anthropocene, Bridie has drawn on her research as a PhD candidate at the University of Otago’s Department of History and Art History. The idea of climate change is nested in the wider idea of the Anthropocene.

  • Beauty Therapy Clinic – Fundraiser for the Breast Cancer Foundation NZ (Oct 15 2018)
    Breast Cancer Foundation NZ

    Beauty Therapy Clinic Fundraiser

    5 – 9 November
    Cumberland Street Campus, Dunedin 

    A range of treatments from $5 including: 

    • Facials
    • Swedish Massage
    • Make-up
    • Waxing
    • Manicure/Pedicure
    • Electrolysis
    • Indian head massage
    • Aromatherapy
    • Microdermabrasion

    Performed by students under supervision.
    All funds donated go to the Breast Cancer Foundation NZ.

    To book, email: BeautyTherapy@op.ac.nz

     

     

  • Strengthening the Connection between Home and School (Sep 27 2018)

    Join us for our next SiMBA (Supervision, Management, Business, Analytics) seminar.


    TUESDAY 9 OCTOBER 2018, 12:00 to 1.00PM
    D317, LEVEL 3, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    James Sunderland will speak on the topic "Strengthening the connection between home and School:  The use of StoryPark at Kimi Ora School"..

    Conventional definitions of place and community have been challenged over the past 20 years as humans have replaced, or augmented, occupation in physical place with online activity.  This research used a qualitative methodology to examine how therapists, teachers, parents, and family members perceive the use of an e-portfolio platform (Storypark) to support the Kimi Ora School community.  Kimi Ora is a special needs school located in Wellington, New Zealand.

    James Sunderland is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Occupational Therapy at Otago Polytechnic.

     

     

     

     

  • Occupational Therapy webinars/seminar (Sep 26 2018)

    You are welcome to join our occupational therapy staff for any of the following webinars. All are from 12.15 to 1pm on a Tuesday, and all except David Rozado's presentation on 9 October will be webinars available for you to join online via Adobe Connect.


    2 October
    Building a Better World: 125 years of Suffrage/125 Voices
    Clare Amos


    9 October
    Otago Polytechnic accessibility software hub
    David Rozado, Senior Lecturer in Information Technology, Otago Polytechnic
    Venue: G203, Level 2, G Block, Otago Polytechnic, Union Street East, Dunedin


    16 October
    The power of narrative: Weaving connection and wellbeing with words
    Pam Morrison, Senior Lecturer, College of Community Development and Personal Wellbeing, Otago Polytechnic


    23 October
    The power of words, discourses and how they shape our action
    Rita Robinson, Principal Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, Otago Polytechnic


    30 October 
    Review of Emerging Placements within Schools
    Jackie Herkt (Principal Lecturer), Ema Tokolahi (Lecturer) and Rita Robinson (Principal Lecturer), Occupational Therapy, Otago Polytechnic


    6 November
    Hannah Arendt and Activity Analysis
    Mary Butler, Principal Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, Otago Polytechnic


     

     

  • Mental Health Awareness Week 8-14 October (Oct 10 2018)

    Let nature in, strengthen your wellbeing – Mā te taiao kia whakapakari tōu oranga!

    WWW.MHAW.CO.NZ

     

    (Link to Mental Health Foundation, most of the ideas below come from this site) 

    Date Theme Ideas / Activities / Links

    Monday 8 October

     

    Connect

    Me whakawhanaunga

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources – enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    12noon – 12.50pm:  “Calming the Busy Overload – an Introduction to Mindfulness” with Heather Day, venue G205

     

    Connect with Papatūānuku – go barefoot, feel the earth under your feet

    Connect with Ranginui by lying on the earth and observe the sky above

    Organise a walk in nature

    Create things with you own hands – use natural material to make art

    Create a green space at home, at work

    Arrange to catch up with a friend or colleague over tea/coffee

    Ask a colleague how they are, then stop and wait for the answer

    Tuesday 9 October

     

    Keep learning

    Me ako tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    12noon – 1.00pm:  Enjoy a cup of tea made from healing herbs growing in our Living Campus Garden kindly ‘brewed’ by the Natural Resources Team

    • Learn how the traditional natural environment can help heal you

     

    Learn / share with others where you are from: your maunga/mountain, awa/river, whenua/land and marae 

    Share fun and interesting facts about traditional Māori places. Learn the te reo Māori names of mountains and river

    Learn the names of New Zealand’s native plants

    Listen to a TED Talk on something that inspires you.

    Wednesday 10 October

     

    Take notice

    Me aro tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

    11.30am – 12.30pm:  Join Student Success in H127 for an informal chat  o A discussion about their roles o What Student Success is currently doing for the wellbeing of our learners o The initiatives they have in place o Future ideas and aspirations for wellbeing on campus

    12 noon: Cancelled due to forecast weather change -  Go for a walk with Heather Day to the Gardens - meet at the table in The Hub

    12.30 pm - 1.00 pm - Relaxation session in H601 - take some time out and allow yourself to relax with this guided focus and relaxation session with Heather Day

    Have an “email-consciousness” day – think before sending that email!!

    Wednesday is an unofficial email –consciousness day. So its`s OK to step back; have a break from emails; be mindful about that email you are about to send or open. Is there another way to communicate with a treasured colleague?  Phone calls are still in fashion and your colleagues will always appreciate a visit from you!

     

    Be inspired by the night sky

    Bring a native plant into your home or workplace

    Take notice of your senses in your environment: what can you smell, taste, hear, touch and see?

    Wear a bright colour and notice how that makes you feel.

     Thursday 11 October

     

    Be active

    Me kori tonu

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

     

    Enjoy the fresh air and play!

    Join in a sport team and meet people

    Take a lunchtime class at Tapuae

    Bring activity into the everyday

    Take a whānau walk after dinner

    Drive into nature so she can give you sustenance!

    Friday 12 October

     

    Give

    Tukua

    OP Activities today:

    11.30am – 1.00pm:  Visit our Mental Health Awareness table in The Hub – for a chat, sharing of information, links to useful resources - enjoy a piece of fruit or a chocolate

     

    Give your harvest / food you have grown to others

    Give your time, your words, your presence to others

    Prepare and share food together * Volunteer for an environment clean-up

    Produce less waste

    Give a smile, a compliment to your work colleagues or others whom you meet

    Buy a coffee and pay for two, a gift for someone who follows.

    Additional activities: 

    Mental Health Quiz Night, Open for all!

    October 16, 2018

    The Hub, 7.30pm

    Donations go the Mental Health Foundation

    Form a team with 5 -6 members and register now!

    To register, send your details and team name to Kathy Howard at HOWAKL1@student.op.ac.nz

    or go to OPSA to sign up.

  • Nursing Research Forum 2018 (Sep 07 2018)

    Registrations are now open for the inaugural research forum of the NZNO Nursing Research Forum.


    13 NOVEMBER 2018, 9.00AM - 5.00PM
    THE DUNEDIN CENTRE, 1 HARROP STREET, DUNEDIN
    COST $40 (FREE FOR NZNO NURSING RESEARCH SECTION MEMBERS)


    Click here to register for this event.

    Programme:

    9.00 Welcome: DrJean Ross and Emma Collins, Otago Polytechnic, NZNO Nursing Research Section committee members

    9.15 "Research in a practice context": Professor Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic

    10.00 Research presentations from experienced researchers

    10.45 Morning tea

    11.00 "Accessing NZNO Scholarships": Wendy Blair, NZNO Professional Advisor

    11.15 "Writing for publication": Dr Jean Ross, Otago Polytechnic

    11.30 "Research methodologies presentation

    12.15 Lunch

    13.00 Research presentations from emerging researchers

    14.15 "NZNO Research Resource": Dr Jed Montayre, AUT

    14.30 "Creating your online research profile": Lesley Brook, Otago Polytechnic

    15.15 Afternoon tea

    16.00 Nursing Research Section Biennial General Meeting: Click here for committee nomination form

    17.00 Conclude

     

     

  • Moodle Templates | Moodle Training Suite (Sep 17 2018)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Creator Series. The Creator Series is designed to provide guidance on how to build a course, administer a course and add, edit and use the wide range of resources and learning activities available in Moodle.

    This module will familiarise you with the Programme and Blended Course Templates so you can easily edit and modify them to meet learning and teaching requirements. 

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Modify a Moodle template to meet the learning and teaching requirements of the course
    • Edit a Moodle template to create a navigable learning environment

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 4 hours


    Event type: Workshop

    Workshop attendance hours: 1 hour

    Workshop dates and times:

  • Intersectional Feminism in Dunedin (Aug 27 2018)

    An exhibition, three evening events, a publication and a blog celebrate the 125th anniversary of women's suffrage in New Zealand.


    EXHIBITION OPENING: 14 SEPTEMBER, 5.30 - 8.00PM
    GEOFF'S STUDIO, LEVEL 2, ALLBELL CHAMBERS, 127 LOWER STUART ST, DUNEDIN


    PECHA KUCHA EVENT: 21 SEPTEMBER 2018, 5.30 - 7.00PM
    GEOFF'S STUDIO, LEVEL 2, ALLBELL CHAMBERS, 127 LOWER STUART ST, DUNEDIN


    STORYTELLING EVENING: 28 SEPTEMBER 2018, 5.30 - 8.00PM
    STUDIO 2, 125 KING EDWARD ST, SOUTH DUNEDIN


    The exhibition will be open from 10.00 am to 4.00 pm:

    • From 14 to 21 September at Geoff's Studio, Level 2, Allbell Chambers, 127 Lower Stuart Street
    • From 23 to 28 September at Studio 2, 125 King Edward Street

    The nine participating artists are:

    Julia Young
    Megan Brady
    Marewa Severne
    Emma Chalmers
    Swaroopa Unni
    Sophie Black
    Matthew Wightman
    Sarah Baird
    Janet De Wagt

    Speakers at the Pecha Kucha event include Otago Polytechnic researchers Dr Jo Kirkwood, Michele Beevors, Kiri Mitchell and Hana Cadzow.

  • Should I stay or should I go? (Aug 23 2018)

    Jayne Webster presents this month's Occupational Therapy seminar.


    TUESDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 2018, 12.15 - 1.00PM
    ONLINE: CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE


    Jayne's presentation will consider: "Factors influencing retention of occupational therapists working in mental health services in New Zealand". Jayne is a Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy at Otago Polytechnic.

     

  • Occupational Therapy webinar (Aug 13 2018)

    Alexa Andrew will present this week's occupational therapy webinar.


    TUESDAY 28 AUGUST 2018, 12.15 - 1.00PM
    ONLINE: CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE


    Alexa's topic is "Public perspectives of a café in the physical and social context of an aged care facility". Alexa is a Senior Lecturer teaching occupational therapy at Otago Polytechnic.

    The Otago Occupational Therapy School are trialling an exciting venture where the intention is to stimulate research connections and discussions with anyone interested! The plan is have these on a weekly basis – so that people do not forget the meetings. Time has been set aside every Tuesday 12:15 – 1pm. Do put this in your calendar. 

     

     

  • Save Sight Symposium (Aug 07 2018)

    This symposium is an opportunity for professionals and lay people alike to expand their knowledge of eye health.


    SATURDAY 8 SEPTEMBER, 10.00AM TO 4.00PM
    THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, CORNER FORTH STREET AND UNION STREET, DUNEDIN
    REGISTER BY EMAIL OR PHONE 0800 569 849 EXT 1


    This one-day symposium is the outcome of a collaboration between Otago Polytechnic, Retina NZ and VICTA (Visual Impairment Charitable Trust Aotearoa). The organising committee has been chaired by Dr Mary Butler, a Principal Lecturer in Occupational Therapy at Otago Polytechnic. Attendance is free but registration is required for catering purposes (lunch is provided).

    In the morning, ophthalmologist Harry Bradshaw will speak on the three main causes of preventable vision loss, and Emma Sandford, a physician qualified in the medical treatment of eye disorders, will discuss eye health and nutrition.

    The messages in Emma’s keynote address will be reflected in the delicious lunch - and in the accompanying recipe and information booklet.

    Participants will have the opportunity to browse around the stalls, including a display by Information Technology students of app development work they have been doing to help with eye health screening.

    After lunch participants can attend a workshop, or a series of short talks, running in parallel from 1 to 2.30pm.

    • The 90 minute workshop, presented by Matt Rudland of the Blind Foundation, will tackle the challenges of making technology accessible for people with low vision.
    • Topics for the short talks include: computer vision syndrome, lighting for low vision, vision screening for teenagers, e-bikes and mobility scooters, moving well with low vision, how brain injury can affect vision, and introducing people with vision loss to online shopping. Presenters of the short talks include Dr Mary Butler and Occupational Therapy students.

    To round off the day, at 2.45pm, a lively collection of Dunedin’s most articulate and opinionated citizens (some venerable, some youthful) will debate the topic: “Not waving but drowning: keeping our heads above the digital flood” with Mark Henaghan, Dean of  Law at the University of Otago, in the Chair.

  • HEA Fellowship Pilot Coming to OP (Aug 06 2018)

    We are delighted to announce a new initiative for academic staff to support recognition of dual professional practice as part of our staff capability enhancement here at OP.

    Working with Professor Lisa Cary from Murdoch University, we are running a series of workshops to support and assist staff to prepare applications for Higher Education Academy (HEA) Fellowships with Higher Advance, the global body which supports enhancement of tertiary learning and teaching. Running for 20 years, the HEA fellowship programme has recently surpassed 100,000 Fellows and is the world’s largest single community for those engaged in higher education learning and teaching. 

    Benefits of being an HEA Fellow

    Fellowship brings a range of benefits including:

    • Consolidating personal development and evidencing of professional practice of your higher education career
    • Provides a valuable measure of success and is increasingly recognised by international institutions
    • Demonstrates commitment to teaching, learning and the learner experience, through engagement in a practical process that encourages research, reflection and development

     

    Who?

    All staff engaged in supporting and facilitating learning at OP are invited to send an expression of interest to su.bolland@op.ac.nz who will be able to provide further details, and confirm registration for the workshop series.  The programme is hosted by Learning and Teaching Services. 

    When?

    The pilot programme runs between August and November 2018, and comprises group workshops and individual support tutorials for the completion of a written reflection on your learning and teaching practice. 

    Programme overview sessions will be offered Tuesday 14th August, 2pm to 4pm and Wednesday 15th August, 10am to 12 noon.

    Individual staff consultations with Dr Lisa Cary will be available Tuesday 14th, Wednesday 15th and Thursday 16th for staff who can't make these times or who would like to follow up on the overview sessions with Dr Cary.

     

    What is involved?

    To complete the programme, participants can expect to spend 20 hours, of which 10 will be contact. Our intention is to support colleagues to submit the completed application for Fellowship in early 2019. (The scope of the application will be explained during the overview session). 

    More info?

    About HEA Fellowships:The Higher Education Academy awards four different categories of Fellowship:, Associate Fellowship (AFHEA), Fellowship (FHEA), Senior Fellowship (SFHEA) and Principal Fellowship (PFHEA).More details here: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/individuals/fellowship About Higher Advance:Higher Advance is a global body which enables recognition and accreditation of practice in learning and teaching for tertiary education worldwide, promoting professionalism and recognising excellence.See: https://www.advance-he.ac.uk/ for more information

     

    Image: People meeting by Startup Stock Photos, licenced under CCO

  • Emotional Intelligence Symposium (Aug 06 2018)

    Join us for the 2018 Emotional Intelligence Symposium.


    FRIDAY 14 SEPTEMBER 2018, 8.30AM to 5.00PM
    SARGOOD CENTRE, LOGAN PARK DRIVE, DUNEDIN
    COST: $120 (INCL GST)


    The 2018 Emotional Intelligence Symposium is a full-day event that provides opportunity to network with other professionals and engage with new strategies for your personal growth. Our goal is to encourage the development of your emotional intelligence while providing a forum to network, engage and grow.

    Lunch provided, just bring a curious mind and a good sense of humour.

    Some parking is available directly outside, however this is short term only. Long term parking is available at Forsyth Barr Stadium which is a 5 minute walk to the Sargood Centre. Alternatively, limited all day free parking may be available on Logan Park Drive.

    Click here to register.

  • Treating obesity and the development of evidence-based practice (Aug 03 2018)

    Dr Claire Madigan will present this seminar.


    TUESDAY 7 AUGUST 12.00-1.00PM

    SARGOOD CENTRE, LOGAN PARK DRIVE, DUNEDIN AND ONLINE: CLICK HERE TO CONNECT


    Dr Claire Madigan is a Senior Clinical Trials Manager at Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care in Health Sciences. Claire will be talking about conducting, managing and the use of research in treating obesity and the development of evidence-based practice. She is happy to take questions, if time allows, but if you have a burning question you really wanted answered email ASAP to Richard Humphrey.

  • Self-regulation strategies of low vision scooter users (Aug 01 2018)

    This month's occupational therapy research seminar is presented by Keri McMullan.


    TUESDAY 7 AUGUST, 12.15 TO 1PM
    ONLINE: CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE


    Keri will discuss the variety of self-regulation strategies reported and demonstrated by research participants. Participants were self-regulating their visual limitations, mobility needs and environmental demands. Many of these strategies were not unique to the visually impaired community and provide valuable insight for therapists who support powered-mobility device users to navigate their neighbourhoods effectively.

     

     

  • Placements Solution overview (Jul 27 2018)

    Anyone that is involved with Placements, Internships, Work experience or apprenticeships is welcome to come along to a quick overview of the project and a demonstration of the Inplace software solution

     

    Tuesday 31st 1pm - 2pm in Puna Kawa

  • Teaching Intact Cord Resuscitation (ICR) to Birth Practitioners (Jul 27 2018)

    This month's Midwifery seminar is presented by Tina Hewitt, a Midwifery Masters student.


    MONDAY 20 AUGUST 2018, 1PM
    ONLINE VIA ADOBE CONNECT: CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE


    Evidence for improved outcomes when cord clamping is deferred for at least one minute has been growing over the past two decades.  Recent changes to local, national and international guidelines encourage longer intervals between birth and cord clamping for healthy term neonates.  However, the evidence for optimal cord clamping time is less clear for compromised neonates. Healthcare practitioners need to make rapid and appropriate decisions at birth about when and whether to transfer a baby to a resuscitation table. 

    Teaching ICR is a relatively new practice for most educators and Tina will demonstrate how this can be included in simulation training. She will discuss the perceived barriers to providing ICR and the reasons why this practice is more likely to be used in primary maternity settings. Tina will share how newborn resuscitation simulation training may be adapted to encourage health professionals to extend the time for placental transfusion, without compromising the newborn by delaying resuscitation.

    Tina Hewitt is a midwifery educator at Canterbury District Health Board. She works at Christchurch Women’s Hospital and across the six primary units in the CDHB region. She is currently engaged in research for her Midwifery Masters at Otago Polytechnic looking at cord clamping at term vaginal births in New Zealand.

  • Writing's role in research (Jul 26 2018)

    Writing's role in research is discussed in this Young Writers' Festival event.


    THURSDAY 6 SEPTEMBER 2018, 12 NOON to 1PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Writing is not merely an outcome but an integral part of Matt Galloway’s research-based art practice. Design is often referred to as a communication framework through which ideas and messages about world reach us. Matt uses the tools and methodologies of design as a way to investigate social issues such as identity, understanding of place, and the political implications of both. In practice this approach involves taking on the role of editor, writer, publisher, printer to produce publications and art objects.

    The role of writing in Hana Cadzow’s research begins with the journals she kept during field trips in Sierra Leone to capture data from her observations and interviews. Her research there and in New Zealand unpacks the experiences of women as they participate in the workforce, in the same positions as men, exploring how and why the women’s experiences differ from men’s experiences. Hana writes in different genres including her Master’s thesis and in order to inform the generation of new policies and practices to improve the participation and experiences of women at work.

    Matt Galloway is a Senior Lecturer teaching Design in the School of Art Design and Architecture. Through his interweaving of art and design practices, he has become an internationally recognised researcher exhibiting in both group and solo exhibitions.

    Hana Cadzow is a Senior Lecturer teaching engineering in the School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences. As well as writing and speaking about her research Hana has been invited to develop a series of training workshops and presentations focused on humanitarian engineering with the NZ branch of international NGO Engineers Without Borders.

    Check out the rest of the New Zealand Young Writers' Festival programme for Dunedin here.

  • Celebrate Design (Jul 20 2018)

    CELEBRATE DESIGN 2018 
    Secondary Schools Awards Exhibition

                                                                                  

    Submissions Due Pick Up Exhibition
    Mon 20th August, 10am-4pm
    School of Design H block Otago Polytechnic Forth St

    Fri 31 & Mon 3 September 10am-4pm
    School of Design H Block
    Otago Polytechnic Forth St 
    (Or by arrangement for schools outside of Dunedin)

    Friday 24 August, 
    The Hub, Otago Polytechnic,
    Forth St, Dunedin
    Opening Event & Prize-giving start at 6pm 
    The Hub 

     

    *Scholarship Prize: open to Year 13 students only and consists of a School of Design Scholarship for Semester One fees for the Bachelor of Design (Communication, Fashion, Product) or Bachelor of Architecture programs.

    What is your design submission? (Describe & include size + an image)

    Name:      

    School:

    Year:

    Email contact:

    Teacher contact:  

     

    Terms and Conditions:

    • Works could include 2D illustrations & images, presentation boards, 3D objects, film & games, garments.
    • Secondary schools to self-curate and send their best student work.
    • Prizes awarded based on a set of judging criteria developed by the Design academic team, all decisions made by the judges are final.
    • Scholarships are open to Year 13 students only and consist of one School of Design fees scholarship for Semester One of an academic year.
    • The School of Design will take all care with works submitted but cannot be held responsible for loss or damage or deliberate defacement outside of our control.
    • Please name all works & include school name on all submissions.

    Contact:
    Tracy Kennedy
    Senior Lecturer Design 
    Tracy.Kennedy@op.ac.nz

     

     

  • Affect and atmosphere in a volunteer tourism destination (Jul 16 2018)

    One of our researchers, Dr Émilie Crossley, will be speaking about her work next week.


    WEDNESDAY 25 July 2018, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

    OTAGO BUSINESS SCHOOL BOARDROOM OBS 2.19/2.20, LEVEL 2, OTAGO BUSINESS SCHOOL, UNION STREET, DUNEDIN


    This paper aims to explore the affective construction of destinations in volunteer tourism. Volunteer tourism provides an interesting practice in which to study affect given that volunteer tourists are frequently characterized as seeking intimate, emotional and cathartic experiences through their travel. Drawing on empirical interview and observational data from a qualitative study of volunteer tourism in Kenya, I analyse three sets of affective encounters that each contribute to the volunteer tourists’ perceptions of Kenya as a tourism destination. The first of these relates to an idealized version of Kenya in which communities provide a warm welcome to visitors and create a friendly, intimate atmosphere; children are central to these interactions. The second set examines encounters that disrupt this welcoming atmosphere, including harassment from beach vendors, beggars and adolescent boys. Finally, I explore the internal dynamics of the volunteer tourist group, including friendships, power relations and morale as they relate to a sense of place in Kenya. I employ what d’Hauteserre (2015) refers to as ‘affect theory’ and a psychoanalytic psychosocial methodology derived from critical psychology in order to compare the relative merits of each analytic approach. This analysis reveals that rather than being pre‐determined by attractions and volunteer projects, Kenya as a tourism destination is produced by temporary social relations, affective atmospheres, and the evocation of feelings or emotions. Certainly in the context of volunteer tourism, micro‐encounters and their affective dynamics, such as being waved to by a stranger in the street, have a significant placemaking function.

    Dr Émilie Crossley is a tourism researcher whose work explores tourist subjectivity from a psychosocial perspective. Her research draws on psychoanalytic theory to approach the psychological in tourism studies in a non‐reductive and culturally engaged way. Émilie’s main body of research presents a qualitative longitudinal study of volunteer tourism in Kenya, focusing on perceptions of poverty, spatialities of care, and the development of ‘ethical’ identities over time. Her research has been published in Tourism Geographies and Tourism Recreation Research. Émilie holds a PhD from Cardiff University and is currently based at Otago Polytechnic in Aotearoa New Zealand.

  • Beyond Petrol – Electric Vehicles (Jul 12 2018)

    Sunday 15 July / 12.30 – 2:00PM / Dunedin Public Library, Dunningham Suite 230 Moray Place, Dunedin


    An Otago Electric Vehicle Society

     

    Electric Cars
    What's under the bonnet and/or an Edubits perspective
    12:30 – 1.00pm

     
    Beyond the ICE age  
    Henrik Moller Emeritus Professor for Sustainability discusses citizen Science, electric vehicles and driving into the future
    1.00 – 1.30pm

     

    From Carriage to Car and Beyond (petrol)
    A light-hearted look at the history of electric vehicles from 1880 to 2018 with Pam McKinlay             
    1.30 – 2.00pm

     

    Panel Q&A 
    2.00 – 2.30PM. Followed by light refreshments.

     

    Beyond Dunedin
    Everyday Missions Part 3 - “Hare and the Turtle”. We’re taking a convoy of EVs to Highlands for a weekend in Drive Electric Week. Bring a notebook, your range anxiety and other questions. Pam McKinlay and Henrik Moller
    3.00 – 3.30 pm

    With thanks to Aurora and Dunedin Public Libraries for sponsoring this event in the NZ International Science Festival 2018.

     

  • Midwifery Information Session - Wellington (Jul 28 2018)

    Support women and families – become a midwife.

    Benefit from our blended delivery programme and study from one of our satellite regions in Dunedin, Central Otago, Southland Wellington, Palmerston North or Whanganui.

    Your study will consist of weekly tutorials with local lecturers, practice experiences with registered midwives, flexible online learning and block courses at the Whitireia campus in Kāpiti. 

    Our Bachelor of Midwifery programme will teach you how to provide woman-centred health care to ensure the best possible experience for women and their families during pregnancy.

    Come along to our Wellington information session and learn about applying for our 2019 degree programme.

    Date: Saturday, 28 July

    Time: 3.30pm

    Venue: Kenepuru Hospital, 6 Hospital Drive, Porirua

     

     

  • Semiconductor: Screening and Masterclass (Jul 06 2018)

    UK artist duo Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt are visiting Dunedin.


    SCREENING OF ARTWORKS FOLLOWED BY QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION
    MONDAY 30 JULY 2018, 8.00PM
    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY - ENTRY FROM MORAY PLACE BY THE REAR WINDOW.


    MASTERCLASS
    TUESDAY 31 JULY 2018
    ENQUIRIES TO DAVID GREEN AT DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART


    semiconductor make artworks which explore the material nature of our world and how we experience it through the lens of science and technology. Their work has been exhibited and screened at The Royal Academy London, the Venice Biennale, and is held in the permanent collections of Hirschhorn Museum, Washington DC, and the Pompidou Centre, Paris.

    At the masterclass they will discuss undertake, research, respond to commissions, and work with institutions, as well as how they use data and build their own software to create artworks.

     

  • Beyond Petrol: Electric Vehicles (Jul 06 2018)

    Kevin O'Neill is sharing his expertise at an Otago Electric Vehicle Society Inc Event.


    SUNDAY 15 JULY, 12.30 - 1.30PM

    DUNNINGHAME SUITE, DUNEDIN PUBLIC LIBRARY, 230 MORAY PLACE, DUNEDIN


    Kevin's topic is Electric Cars: What's under the Bonnet?

    He is the first of three speakers that afternoon, who will be followed by a question and answer session at 2pm. This event is sponsored by Aurora Energy and Dunedin Public Libraries and is part of the NZ International Science Festival 2018.

     

  • Learn more about the programmes that will lead you to a career you'll love! (Jun 28 2018)

    July - September 2018, Otago Polytechnic


     

    We invite all future students and their families to visit our campus or try one of our short courses! Learn more about the programmes that will lead you to a career you'll love!

     

    16-19
    July

     

    Communication Design Winter Camp

    Four days: Monday 16 – Thursday 19 July

    Our ever-popular Winter Camp provides students with the opportunity to learn new skills and improve their portfolio. Options include: Digital Animation, Digital Illustration, Web Design and Game Design.

    pam.hodgkinson@op.ac.nz

    FIND OUT MORE >

    01 
    August

     

    Sports Turf Management Information Day

    Wednesday 1 August, 9.00am – 3.00pm
    Forsyth Barr Stadium and University of Otago Oval

    We invite your students to spend a fun and interactive day at the Forsyth Barr Stadium and University of Otago Oval to learn about Otago Polytechnic’s range of Sports Turf Management programmes and the career opportunities available in this exciting industry.

    RSVP by 24 July: elizabeth.gilmore@op.ac.nz

    02
    August

     

    Careers in Health Expo

    Thursday 2 August, 5.30pm – 7.00pm
    The Hub, Dunedin Campus

    This is your opportunity to explore your healthcare career options at our expo and range of informative seminars. Learn about our healthcare programmes, what you need to do to apply to study in 2019 – and speak to our qualified staff, healthcare practitioners and industry professionals about your healthcare career aspirations.

    Find out more about our Health programmes:

    • Nursing
    • Midwifery
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Social Services (Counselling, Career Practice, Disability Support and Coordination, Human Services, Mental Health Support Work)
    • Sport and Exercise
    • Massage Therapy
    • Degree and Diploma bridging option 

    07
    August

     

    Engineering and Automotive Trades Information Day

    Tuesday 7 August, 9.00am - 1.00pm
    Participants will learn all about our Level 2 and Level 3 engineering trades programmes. Entry is free and lunch will be provided.

     The day incudes:

    • An overview of engineering and automotive trades as a career
    • Learning about working in the engineering and automotive industries

    RSVP by 27 July: ECLadmin@op.ac.nz

    13
    August

     

    Engineering Technologies Information Day

    Civil, Mechanical and Electrical (including Mechatronics) - Degree and Diploma

    Monday 13 August, 10.00am - 3.00pm

    Participants will learn all about engineering and the opportunities open them when they graduate with our diploma or degree qualifications. Entry is free and lunch will be provided.

    The day includes:

    • An overview of engineering technologies
    • An overview of our diploma and degree programmes and our bridging options
    • An EXCLUSIVE tour of the Forsyth Barr Stadium
    • Hear from our engineering employers
    • Laboratory tours ­ a real hands-on experience!

    RSVP by 1 August: ECLadmin@op.ac.nz

    25
    August

     

    Dunedin School of Art Open Day and Workshops

    Saturday 25 August, 10.00am – 3.00pm
    Dunedin School of Art, Riego St (off Albany St)


    The Dunedin School of Art is offering FREE workshop experiences in their world-class facilities for Open Day.

    If you’d like to try out a specific technique, or are interested in what they get up to, please come along.
    The workshops are suitable for anyone - no prior experience required.

    Studio workshops include: > Ceramics > Drawing > Painting > Photography > Jewellery & Metalsmithing > Printmaking > Textiles

    Tours of the school will be available during the Open Day. For those interested in studying in 2019, bring along copies of your artwork or portfolio to discuss with school staff a provisional placement for 2019.

    For more information:
    artadmin@op.ac.nz
    0800 762 786 or

    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED
    Turn up on the day and have a go!

    FIND OUT MORE >

    04
    September

     

    Construction

    Building Industry Seminar in Association with Otago Master Builders, He Toki and the Industry Training Association Building (ITABS)

    Tuesday 4 September, 9.15am - 2.30pm

    Participants will learn about the current trends in the building industry, what it is like being a building apprentice and the dynamic and rewarding job opportunities available to graduates.

    Spaces are available for up to six students from either Years 12 and/or 13 from each school (further places may be available, please enquire). Entry is free and lunch will be provided

    RSVP by 14 August: ECLadmin@op.ac.nz

    18
    September

     

    Occupational Therapy Information Evening

    Tuesday 18 September, 6.00pm - 7.30pm
    G203, G Block, corner Harbour Terrace and Union Street 


    Occupational Therapists help people achieve independence, meaning and satisfaction in daily occupations. Come and learn about this diverse people-oriented profession. Hear from therapists about their work, from staff about the programme design and the things you will be involved in and from students about what it's like to be part of the programme. Students, parents and whanau are all welcome. 

  • Exhibition - NZ Certificate in Arts and Design (Jun 26 2018)

    Our first cohort of the New Zealand Certificate in Arts and Design is proud to present their art and design work from semester one. This exhibition is open on Level 3 of H Block on Wednesday 27 and Thursday 28 June 10am-4pm and Friday 29 June 10am-2pm.

  • Online Midwifery Research Seminar Series 23 July (Jun 22 2018)

    All are welcome to attend the Midwifery Research Seminar Series for 23 July.

    The seminar starts at 1pm and is via Adobe Connect. 

    Presentation 1:   Dr Glenys Ker

    Programme Leader – Capable NZ

    Facilitating for Transformative Learning:  Developing the Facilitators

    This presentation explains a model for developing facilitators to bring about transformative learning with adult learners in the workplace.  The model is developed from a study of learners engaged in the independent learning pathway (ILP) to bachelor degrees offered by Capable NZ, a School within Otago Polytechnic. Graduates from this programme report their experience as transformative and attribute that transformation significantly to the reflective process in which they have engaged.  To be effective, this reflective process requires highly skilful facilitators, for whom the skills, knowledge and attitudes were identified through this study.

    Glenys is the Programme Leader of the undergrad qualifications on offer through Capable NZ, a School in Otago Polytechnic specializing in work-based learning and professional practice qualifications. She works as a facilitator of learning, supporting learners to articulate their skills, knowledge and attitudes gained from their work-based learning experiences, as well as undertaking new learning to gain a degree qualification through Capable NZ’s independent learning pathways. Glenys brings to her facilitation a background in career practice, a teacher in secondary school, polytechnic and university level, and roles in senior management and leadership.

    Glenys has particular interests in adult learning, management and leadership, elite sports performance, career development and in the recognition of prior experiential learning.

    Presentation 2:   Tricia Thompson

    Tricia works part time as a Senior Lecturer for the School of Midwifery as a senior lecturer, with a subject focus on sociology, sustainability and global midwifery, and part time as a practising midwife. She has a graduate certificate in tertiary learning and teaching (GCTLT) and enjoys the challenge of trying to meet the learning needs of students in the midwifery school , who are typically from a wide range of ages as well as social and educational backgrounds.

    Insights from planning and running a new and innovative interactive exercise for year one midwifery students

    Tricia will share insights from the development and implementation of a new and innovative class exercise which was undertaken this year with year one midwifery students in Women in Aotearoa,  the sociology based paper in the Bachelor of Midwifery programme. How best to learn about the history of women's changing roles in society, at the same time incorporating bigger picture issues such as feminism, status of women, and the varied realities of women's lives over time? 

  • Occupational Therapy Information Evening - 18 September (Sep 18 2018)

    Do you want to make a difference in people’s lives?

    Do you see yourself working in a community career where people come first?

    Do you want to know more before you decide whether occupational therapy is the career for you?

    Come along to our Occupational Therapy information evening.

    Occupational Therapists help people achieve independence, meaning and satisfaction in daily occupations. Come and learn about this diverse people oriented profession; hear from therapists about their work, from staff about the programme design and the things you will be involved in, and from students about what it’s like to be part of the programme. Students, parents and whanau are all welcome.

     

    Date: Tuesday 18 September

    Time: 6.30pm to 7.30pm

    Location: G Block, Corner of Harbour Terrace and Union Street (Map)

    Find out more about our programmes.

  • Design for Social Innovation symposium (Jun 15 2018)
    This symposium explores the emerging intersection between Design, Social and Impact in Aotearoa New Zealand.
    10 - 11 OCTOBER 2018
    THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN
    Design approaches are being taken up across sectors as diverse as health, education, employment and business. Nationally we are investing in design-led programs and responses as a way to tackle complex social challenges.
     
    The DSI Network aims to build connections between practitioners and create space for sharing insights and learnings across different sectors. We aim to support the development of co-design practices that are of Aotearoa, and challenge ourselves as practitioners, managers and policy makers to ask what else is needed for design to have impact.
    Associate Professor Caro McCaw of Otago Polytechnic is a member of the organising committee and will be speaking at the symposium Find out more and register here at the symposium website.
  • Public Art, Art/Science and Climate Change (Jun 15 2018)

    Our second semester public art seminar programme begins with a presentation by Bridie Lonie.


    THURSDAY 21 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM

    P152,DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements. 

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of Ara Toi Ōtepoti – Our Creative Future,the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy. 

  • Public Exhibition: I Didn’t Walk Away — Absurdity & Resistance / Renata Duan (Jun 14 2018)

    18 - 22 JUNE / OPENING Monday 18 June, 5 - 7pm / DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)   / HOURS Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm / Saturday 10am – 3pm

     

    Renata Duan - Artist's statement

    A lomographer who doesn’t paint cannot be a good translator.

    My exhibition is a series of acrylic paintings, using my own LOMO photos as reference and looking at the world through the lens of what’s going on in China.

    For the last 9 years, my previous job as a translator and other life choices took me to many places around the world. Everywhere I went, I carried my LOMO camera (a type of vintage analogue camera) to record the journey of my experiences. The pictures I took eventually became my personal database, from which I chose the ones that allow me to express more than what a photo can tell – I “translated” them by painting them on canvas.

    Having grown up in China, I witnessed the earth-shaking changes that it went through since the economic reforms. Despite achieving unprecedented economic growth, it also brought about countless issues. Air pollution, with vast areas covered in thick smog (the main reason I left China); land degradation and overexploitation; ubiquitous surveillance of both the physical and virtual worlds; all of which create an oppressive environment.

    However, the more I read and the more I travelled, I realised that these seemingly Chinese issues happen in fact throughout the entire world. I want my paintings to be a “soft punch” – a way to make people become aware of the issues I am addressing, or to be a reminder – making people rethink the familiar and ask the question “Does my country have the same problem?”

    With scenes of stillness and unidentified locations or architectures, I try to depict the sense of absurdity and futility coming up with the observation of what is happening around the world. I am expressing my social and political commentaries and my questioning attitude towards the relationship between human activities and the environment, as well as my emotional responses to them all.

    Even though I might not change anything, I see the act of pointing out these problems as a way of resistance against said absurdity, like Sisyphus eternally pushing his boulder uphill. As Camus said, “The struggle itself is enough to fill a man’s heart”.

  • Exhibition: Art+Oceans (Art and Science Project 2018) (Jun 09 2018)

    23 JULY- 5 AUGUST, 2018 H D SKINNER ANNEX, OTAGO MUSEUM

    10AM - 3PM

    ART + OCEANS EXHIBITION

    Tackling the complexities of our changing marine world, artists and scientists have collaborated for several months to imagine new generative interactions between science and art. They have produced works that interpret and extend science research in new contexts for the up-coming "ART + OCEANS" exhibition opening in the HD Skinner Annex, Otago Museum on 23 July, 2018.

    This large group exhibition represents collaborative work from 30 artists (graduates, staff and senior students of the Dunedin School of Art and School of Design at Otago Polytechnic) and 20 scientists involved from University of Otago (Researchers from Surveying, Physics, Anatomy, Chemistry, Botany, Marine Science, Te Koronga (Indigenous Science) Physical Education, Zoology), Cawthron Institute (New Zealand's largest independent science organisation), Landcare Research, NIWA, Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge, CARIM (Coastal Acidification: Rate, Impacts & Management), Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, and a four year project funded by the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment.

    This is the sixth in the Art + “Science” project series. In Art + Oceans, artists worked with scientists individually or in small groups, to develop artworks relating to science interpreted in a broad context. Art + Oceans 2018 is supported by the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge, which provided funding for a component of the artworks to be made transportable in a travelling exhibition. 

    Co-ordinators:

    Pam McKinlay is an artist with a background in applied science and history of art. As an artist she works predominantly in sculpture, weaving and ceramics. She works in collaboration with other artists locally and nationally in community outreach and education projects around the theme of climate change, sustainability and biodiversity.
    Pam McKinlay, Dunedin School of Art Pam.McKinlay@op.ac.nz 

    Jenny Rock has backgrounds in science and art. She has spent > 20 years as a scientific researcher (particularly in marine biology) and is an intaglio and relief printmaker, as well as occasional poet. Currently she is a Sr Lecturer in Science Communication (University of Otago) focusing on aesthetics, participatory practice, sensory cognition, and ArtScience.

    Jenny Rock, Otago University Jenny.Rock@otago.ac.nz 

     

    Our sponsors and partners:

     

    Cover image by: Pam McKinlay and Jesse-James Pickery, Tethys Hinemoana: Call of the Ocean, 2018

     

  • Register now for our Māori Research Symposium (Sep 07 2018)

    The Māori Research Symposium, Mauri Ora: Human Flourishing, to be held on 9 November, aims to showcase Māori research undertaken at Otago Polytechnic. The second Māori symposium hosted by the Polytechnic, it follows the inaugural Tā Moko Symposium held in 2014.

    The symposium aims to nurture research conducted by Māori staff and students – that is, research undertaken by Māori, for Māori, or with Māori; as well as provide opportunities to share Māori research fields and expertise and celebrate the depth and breadth of Māori research conducted at Otago Polytechnic.

    Submissions for peer-reviewed full papers (for potential inclusion in the 2019 SCOPE: Kaupapa Kāi Tahu publication) are now invited from staff and students involved in Māori-led and/or partnered research. These are due by 29 October

    Register here > 

    For more information, contact kelli.temaiharoa@op.ac.nz 

  • Associate Professor Linda Robertson (Jun 07 2018)

    Dr Linda Robertson will speak at a celebration of her appointment as Associate Professor.


    9 JULY 2018, 5.30 - 7 PM

    HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN

    CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE


    Many people have ideas and willingness to set up groups that are beneficial for their local community, but only some such groups survive. Associate Professor Dr Linda Robertson will consider the features of group processes for a peer-led exercise group for senior citizens, called Steady As You Go. What gives people ownership of the group and makes them feel valued members of it? How do you create a positive group culture? What support do peer leaders need to continue in their leadership roles? What strategies ensure leadership succession? The answers to these and other questions identify characteristics that are likely to be helpful to maintain the viability of similar peer-led groups.

    Linda is an experienced lecturer in occupational therapy, and her address will be of interest to practising occupational therapists and those who work with seniors in the community. Linda has taught at all levels of occupational therapy education but is now focusing on postgraduate courses. She has a PhD from Victoria University of Wellington, a Masters in Education from Edinburgh University, and BA from Alderson Broaddus College (US). Her topics of research expertise are clinical reasoning, qualitative research methods, education, and care of older people. A major achievement from a long career in teaching is her book, Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy Controversies in Practice, published in 2012.

    Linda is a registered occupational therapist and a member of the Abbeyfield Dunedin Inc committee and of the Age Concern Otago executive committee. Her current research interests focuses on the sustainable care of older people in the community.

  • Business student showcase (May 29 2018)

    Come and see an exhibition of posters by our Business students.


    WEDNESDAY 6 JUNE, FROM 3.30PM

    THE HUB, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    A selection of our Graduate Diploma in Applied Management students are presenting their industry projects. Learn what they've been doing and be inspired with ideas about how you might work with our students.

  • Science in Action: Educators Workshop, 10 July (May 29 2018)

    Tuesday 10 July,  4.30pm | Otago Polytechnic – Manaaki, Harbour Terrace, Dunedin |  Facilitated by: Ken Silburn


    We warmly invite you to this professional development opportunity; Science in Action Educators workshop. To gain an insight into the teaching methods of renowned science educator, communicator, certified Google trainer and Microsoft expert – Ken Silburn.

    Ken is passionate about teaching 21st century skills and increasing the educational opportunities of students on a global scale. Ken is internationally renowned in science education, especially in the area of Environmental and Space Science. He is a recognised Global Teacher Ambassador, having been acknowledged as one of the top ten teachers in the world (from over 23,000 nominations) through the Varkey Global Teacher Prize. He is also the recipient of the prestigious Dr Paul Brock Medal from the Australian College of Educators.

    At this hands-on workshop you will have the opportunity to work with Ken as he shares how to engage students in STEM.

    The workshop will conclude with complimentary drinks and nibbles, prior to Ken’s keynote address taking place at 6.30pm in G Block, Room G106 as part of the 2018 International Science Festival.

    Find out more about Ken http://www.science.gov.au/community/PrimeMinistersPrizesforScience/Recipients/2015/Pages/Ken-Silburn.aspx

    Watch Ken in action here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUHQY828FTo

    Please RSVP to Elizabeth.Gilmore@op.ac.nz 

     

     

     

     

  • IT Mid-Year Student Showcase (Jun 15 2018)

    Illustrating the potential benefits of student and industry partnerships, our IT students reveal the solutions they’ve developed for real clients and how they have harnessed the latest technological advancements.

    The work of our Information Technology students will be on show for the public in their mid-year showcase. Take the opportunity to come and talk to our students about their projects, including:

    • The Internet of Things
    • Machine Learning
    • Web Development
    • Mobile Development
    • Games Development
    • A Robot Garden.. Farmbot!!
    • Community IT help-desk
    • IT event filming and promotion
    • Creating community self-help material
    • Hardware Lab maintenance and replacement plan
    • Creative student movies
    Friday, June 15
    5.30pm to 8.00pm
    D Block, Otago Polytechnic, Harbour Terrace, Dunedin
    Find out more about our 2018 and 2019 Information Technology programmes.
  • PUBLIC EXHIBITION: TOP ART (NCEA Level 3 portfolios) (Jun 05 2018)

    5- 14 JUNE, P BLOCK, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (OFF ALBANY ST)

    Top Art is an annual touring exhibition featuring a selection of the NCEA Level 3 portfolios that achieved Excellence in Visual Art in the previous year. Five streams are covered: design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

    For other inquiries contact:
    artadmin@op.ac.nz to book a workshop, arrange a tour of the Art School or talk to staff about portfolio preparation.

    EXHIBITION DATES
    June 5 - 14, 2018

    EXHIBITION HOURS
    Week 1
    Tuesday 1pm - 4pm
    Wednesday - Friday 10am -4pm
    Week 2
    Monday - Thursday 10am -4pm

     

    The Dunedin School of Art invites high school students to our Open Day workshops and tours on Saturday August 25th
    10am - 3pm 2018.
    Bookings not required.

     

    Dunedin School of Art
    Ground Floor, P Block
    Riego Street (off Albany St)
    Dunedin

     

    Image credit: Rebekah Roimata Langsbury, St Hilda’s Collegiate School

  • Public Seminar: The Dead Heart - the 'museum in ruins' (May 27 2018)

    31 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    The Dead Heart
    Michele Beevors

    In 1993 Douglas Crimp published the book “On the Museum’s Ruins”  which  discussed  contemporary art work and provided a  framework  for  new curatorial styles and new art institutions which had begun to be imagined in Europe.  Beevors will discuss the idea of the 'museum in ruins' in relation to her recent research in the museums of Vienna and Paris and recent exhibitions of her work in Vienna and New Zealand. 

    Michele Beevors is an Australian artist and a Senior Lecturer in Sculpture at the Dunedin School of Art of Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand. She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Columbia University in New York and a Master of Arts from The Australian National University in Canberra and has exhibited in the United States, Australia, New Zealand and Europe.

     

  • TEXpo and Tech talks (May 17 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic is pleased to host in our Hub on Forth Street a series of talks during the TEXpo, Saturday 26 May, from 11am to 3pm. 

    The schedule of speakers will be covering an exciting range of topics, below. Visit the Techweek website to find out more.


    11.00 AM 

    Electric Vehicles training: what's happening locally and nationally

    Hamish Miller

     

     


    11.30 PM

    Healthcare Technology - past present and future

    Emma Collins


    12.00 PM

    Internet of Things using LoRa

    Patrick Loots


    12.30 PM

    NZ Space Challenge 2018

    Anton Hughes and Adam Campbell


    1.00 PM

    Open Source Accessibility Software for motor impairment

    David Rozado


    1.30 PM

    Computers, Facebook, Social Media, Robots: Good Grief!

    Keith Lightfoot


    2.00 PM

    Unweaving the rainbow: light and vision in everyday life

    Dr Mary Butler


    2.30 PM

    Low cost energy monitoring

    Neville Auton


    Find out more about the whole TEXpo here.

  • Employment Expo (May 15 2018)

    Employment Expo

    Have a real chat with real people about real jobs! 

    Learn more about the employment, volunteering and work experience opportunities.

    You will have the opportunity to speak to

    • Select Recruitment
    • NZ Defence ForcesNZ Police
    • Silverline
    • Unicrew Volunteering
    • Adeco
    • DKW
    • Tradestaff
    • Student Job Search
    • OUSA

    The Student Success Team will also be there to provide career guidance and support and OPSA will be providing refreshments.

    Date: Tuesday 22 May
    Time: 10.30am – 1.30pm
    Location: The Hub, F Block, Forth Street
  • Foundation Learning Information Sessions: Dunedin and Mosgiel (May 08 2018)

    Keen to do further study or enter the workforce - but need to polish up on some basic skills?

    Our practical, supportive Foundation Learning programmes can help improve your English, Numeracy, Computer skills, Study skills, and Employment skills.

    We also offer electives that will help you pursue a career in a number of key industries including health, beauty therapy, tourism and engineering.

    Find out more at our information sessions:

    Tuesday 3 July
    Mosgiel Library – 6.00pm to 6.30pm

    Thursday 5 July
    Dunedin Campus (Harrow Street - see map) – 2.00pm to 2.30pm

    Your fees could be free (conditions apply). 
    Find out more about our Foundation programmes.

     

     

  • Business and Tourism Morning Tea (May 08 2018)

    Calling all Mums and Dads!

    Want to take your first step towards a career in Business or Tourism ... but think you can’t juggle family life with studying?

    You can, and we are here to help you! We offer:

    • Certificates for all levels of learning – which pathway into higher level programmes
    • Degrees and diplomas
    • Classes during school hours
    • Flexible delivery so you can fit study around your family
    • On-campus childcare facilities
    • Teaching and support staff who understand the pressures of parenthood!

    Want to find out more? Come along to our morning tea!

    You can speak to our staff about your study options and meet other Mums and Dads who are also looking to embark on their career journeys.

    Friday 8 June – 10.00am to 11.30am
    Room D102, Dunedin Campus, Harbour Terrace

    • Refreshments • Supervised children’s play area • Career guidance • StudyLink advice • Car parking available in our visitors' car park on Harbour Terrace

    Please see the map for the location of D Block and visitor car parking (labelled as VCP on map) on Harbour Terrace.

  • Career Guidance Assessment (May 08 2018)

    Dr Steve Atkins will present this seminar on Western/non-Western and Qual/Quant-hybrid Methods in Career Guidance Assessment.


    29 MAY 2018, 12 to 1PM

    D102, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    Dr Steve Atkins will give us a preview of work which he is soon to present at two international conferences, about developing methods for vocationally testing high school leavers to help them find best-fit careers. This is one of a series of seminars in the Supervision, Management, Business, Analytics (SiMBA) series. 

    Steve is Research Coordinator (Business) at Otago Polytechnic. He lectures in cross-cultural management, organisational behaviour, industrial psychology and business research methods. His research interests include cognitions for social marketing, project-based learning, and personality fit in the workplace. He also undertakes teamwork optimisation and team mission analysis in regards to project and volunteer staffing research.

  • Research for Education seminar series (Aug 22 2018)

    In the second half of 2018 we are holding a series of seminars aimed at discussion and dissemination of research-informed education practice.  


    26 JUNE 2018

    Global Partnerships

    Ass Prof Caro McCaw, with Philippa Keaney and Ron Bull

    Caros-slides.pdf


    3 JULY 2018

    A model for facilitating learning

    Dr Glenys Ker

    Glenys-slides.pptx

    Glenys-handout.pdf


    28 AUGUST 2018

    Developing leaders

    Andy Thompson

    Andy-Thompson-slides-28-Aug-2018.pptx


    4 SEPTEMBER 2018

    Revealing student engagement and confidence

    Dale Parsons and Krissi Wood

    Dale-and-Krissis-slides-4-Sep-2018.pdf


    9 OCTOBER 2018

    Learner Capability Framework: improving graduate employability 

    Dr Behnam Soltani and Andy Kilsby

    Andy-Kilsbys-Education-Research-Seminar-slides.pptx

    Behnam-Soltanis-Learner-Capability-Research-slides.pptx


    All seminars in this series were on a Tuesday, from 4pm to 5pm, in room H224, immediately to the right at the top of the first flight of stairs in H Block, on our Forth Street campus. 

    Click here for our campus map. 

    If you are unable to attend in person, please email us to arrange to participate online by Skype.

  • Social Design (May 02 2018)

    Associate Professor Caro McCaw is speaking about Social Design programmes in the northeast of the USA.


    WEDNESDAY 16 MAY 2018, 12.15-1.00PM - NOTE NEW DATE

    COMMON AREA, LEVEL 3, H BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    Caro McCaw is Academic Leader for Communication Design and teaches across a range of courses including Interaction Design and Studio Projects. She is involved in a wide range of creative projects. Caro McCaw investigates how we come to understand our landscapes, local knowledge, and regional cultures and contexts through collaborative creative practice. She asks how we may work around colonial ways of seeing to visualize and understand our shared histories and sites more socially. She is involved in a wide range of local community and regional development projects often working with collaborative student-staff teams, and local community groups, including museums. Caro was invited to spend nine months as a prestigious Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at SUNY Canton, in Upstate New York in 2016/17.

    This is the first of this year Design SOUP BOX public lecture series (with free soup), which will be held weekly during the winter terms.

     

     

     

  • Training tips from a world strongman (May 02 2018)

    Join us for a live webchat with Tom Hibbert (Trainer, Coach and World Strongman).


    TUESDAY 8 MAY 2018, 12.00-1.00PM

    ONLINE using Adobe Connect software

    LIVESTREAMED AT THE SARGOOD CENTRE, LOGAN PARK DRIVE, DUNEDIN


    We are pleased to welcome Tom Hibbert, owner and operator of Winning Health Solutions in the United Kingdom. Tom has a track record of success in strength and conditioning. Graduating from University of Southampton, Tom established himself as a successful Personal Trainer before setting up Winning Health Solutions. He is a PICP Level 4 and competes internationally as a strongman, winning the England U/90Kg Strongman title and placing third in World Championships in 2016. He also trains strongman champions both face to face and using online training methods. He will be talking about the use of research and other evidence to inform practice and techniques for online training of athletes. He is happy to take questions, if time allows. If you have a burning question you really wanted answered email us ASAP.

    Each semester, the institute will organise seminars aimed at the staff and postgraduate students working and studying in the applied science field. They provide a space for staff and students to share, discuss and advance research and practice on various aspects of applied science.
    The seminars bring together guest speakers, staff, students and others to reflect on cutting edge ideas emerging in current scholarly research and applied practice. The postgraduate seminar series is also an opportunity for current master’s students to test out their research questions and findings through a series of presentations to peers, staff and guests.

  • Dunedin TEXpo (May 02 2018)

    Dunedin TEXpo
    Saturday 26 May, 11.00am – 3.00pm

    Dunedin Techweek TEXpo, a free, collaborative, cross campus showcase of innovative tech research, products and industries in our great city.

    With two sites on Union St East: The Otago University Business School, and the Otago Polytechnic Hub, there will be loads of interesting tech on display, and things to get your hands on, including electric vehicles drives!

    In our Hub we will have displays from local companies AbacusBio, Scott Technology, Department of Conservation, Hatch Education, Firebrand, Blue Penguins Pukekura, REZO Water and Energy, Igtimi, Malcam Foundation, Blueskin Energy Network, design build listen, Runaway Play, Pickapark, Tracmap and Select Recruitment along with displays from our own departments in Occupational Therapy, Information Technology, Nursing, Communication Design, Engineering Technology, Sport, Automotive, and EPICentre.

    Come along and bring your friends and family to this free event.

    FIND OUT MORE >

  • Adventure Therapy (May 01 2018)

    Be inspired by one of the world’s leading Adventure Therapy experts. Learn how the outdoors, experiential learning theory and adventurous activities create meaningful change in people with mental health or addiction issues.


    23 MAY 2018, 5.30 – 7.00PM

    ROOM Z114, SARGOOD CENTRE, 40 LOGAN PARK DRIVE, DUNEDIN


    Visiting lecturer Dr Michael Gass from the University of New Hampshire's topic is "Adventure therapy: Walking the talk of change in mental health and substance abuse". How do the outdoor environment, experiential learning theory and adventurous activities create meaningful change in mental health and addiction fields? This presentation will explore some of the history and development of adventure therapy in the USA in the context of working in mental health and addictions. Evidence for the effectiveness of Adventure Therapy will be presented, and strategies for application of experiential learning and adventure therapy practice shared. These strategies will include the introduction of a model to guide clinical reasoning in adventure therapy practice, and how to use metaphor to enhance therapeutic value in activity based therapy.

    Michael Gass is a Professor and Coordinator of the Outdoor Education Program in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of New Hampshire. He received his Ph.D. in experiential education and completed postdoctoral studies in marriage and family therapy. He is the Director of the Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Research Center and the National Association for Therapeutic Schools and Program (NATSAP) Research Database. He has published over 200 research studies and provided over 300 professional presentations.

     

  • Course Administration Basics | Moodle Training Suite (Sep 12 2018)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Creator Series. The Creator Series is designed to provide guidance on how to build a course, administer a course and add, edit and use the wide range of resources and learning activities available in Moodle.

    This module will familiarise you with the administrative aspects for a course such as adding images and attributing them appropriately, adding, importing and duplicating activities and resources, adding and using editing tools, blocks and groups.

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Add and use images and resources appropriately in Moodle to create a course
    • Add and use blocks to administer a course
    • Add and use editing tools to create a course
    • Set up the gradebook to administer course assessments and marking workflow

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 5 hours


    Event type: Workshop

    Attendance hours: 1 hour

    Dates and times:

  • Copyright and Open Educational Resources | Moodle Training Suite (Sep 26 2018)

    This module is part of the Moodle Training Suite | Start Up Series. The Start Up Series is designed to give you a foundational knowledge of Moodle before you embark on creating courses and course content.

    This module introduces you to some underlying principles around online learning and developing activities online, including Open Educational Resources (OERs), copyright, creative commons and attribution of resources.

    Learning outcomes

    On completion of this online module you will be able to:

    • Identify when and how to apply copyright standards when creating Moodle courses
    • Identify and select creative common images appropriate for the end use
    • Search for OERs to help create Moodle courses

     

    Event type: Enrol now for online self-paced option

    Online learning hours: 1.5 hours

  • Anomalous – Pop Up Emerging Designer Shop (Apr 26 2018)

    Anomalous – Pop Up Emerging Designer Shop

    Featuring a wide range of clothing, jewellery, handbags, house products and prints designed by Otago Polytechnic students and graduates.

    11.00am – 6.00pm, Wednesday 2 May – Sunday 6 May
    220 George St, Dunedin

    CASH ONLY

    Live music from 5pm, Thursday and Friday before the iD international emerging designer shows.

    iD Dunedin Fashion Week >

  • Is Innovation Good for the World? (Apr 17 2018)

    This panel discussion is an exciting prelude to TechWeek 2018 in Dunedin.


    FRIDAY 18 MAY 2018, 5.30 - 8.30 PM

    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY, OCTAGON, DUNEDIN

    COST $21.97 PER PERSON


    With a panel of highly respected and entertaining professionals covering education, law, sustainability, medicine, culture and innovation, this event will serve to highlight the pro's and con's of innovation, and ignite discussion on what we need to do as a city, and as a country to best utilise emerging technologies.

    Panel members are:

    • Pete Hodgson - CEO of Otago Innovation and Chairman of the Southern Partnership Group,
    • Phil Ker - Chief Executive of Otago Polytechnic
    • Prof. Jacinta Ruru - Co-director of Nga Pae O te Maramatanga, NZ's Maori Centre of Research Excellence
    • Julie Curphey - Marketing Manager of Blis Technologies Ltd, ex Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and AD Instruments

    The panel discussion will be fFacilitated by Damian Newell.

    Schedule:

    5.30 - 6.15pm - Drink and canapes (Included in ticket price)

    6.15 - 7.30 - Introduction and Individual panellist presentations

    7.30 - 7.45 - Refreshment Interval (Cash bar)

    7.45 - 8.30 - Panel and audience question discussion

    The audience will be invited to submit questions for discussion throughout the event.

    Be part of this important discussion - limited seats available so buy your tickets now!

    Read more about other Techweek events.

  • The Freedom of the Migrant (Apr 17 2018)

    Matt Galloway examines political narratives around immigration.


    EXHIBITION 21 APRIL TO 12 AUGUST 2018

    ARTIST-CONVENED PANEL DISCUSSION 11.00 AM, SATURDAY 14 JULY

    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY, OCTAGON, DUNEDIN


    The Freedom of the Migrant takes its starting point from a column published in the New Zealand Herald on 26 March 2016, written by NZME Head of Business Fran O’Sullivan. In this, O’Sullivan retells a scenario of a hypothetical terrorist attack that was presented by Sir John Key to members of the business community in Auckland, shortly after his return from a meeting of the International Democratic Union (of which Key was then Chairperson).  The article opens up questions of how New Zealand politicians might position this country to benefit from the perception of its distance from current global and political instability.

    Matthew Galloway uses the tools and methodologies of design to discuss the central themes introduced in Key’s hypothesis – addressing the impact and legacy of dominant political narratives constructed around terrorism and the refugee crisis, and examining how this in turn influences collective perceptions of border control, freedom of movement, and national identity. Through his research-led art practice, Galloway explores aspects of the visual language of politics, peace and conflict. A printed newspaper features a series of interviews with experts across the fields of immigration policy, terrorism and political commentary, providing an accompanying dialogue that follows the trajectory of Galloway’s research process. Through these two strands of investigation, The Freedom of the Migrant speaks to the complexity of this current period of uncertainty and change in a national and global environment.

    On 14 July, at 11.00 am a panel discussion will be held on the exhibition The Freedom of the Migrant: Join Professor Richard Jackson, Director, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago; Dr David Hall, Senior Researcher at The Policy Observatory, Auckland University of Technology; and Fran O’Sullivan, Managing Director of NZ INC. and prominent columnist for the NZ Herald. The convenor is artist Matthew Galloway.

  • International Science Festival 2018: Science in Action Day (Jul 10 2018)

    At Otago Polytechnic we create amazing careers that apply science to the real world. This fun and interactive day is the perfect opportunity for students aged 13-16 years to explore the exciting science behind the careers we offer in a range of our renowned programmes.

     

    Date: Tuesday, July 10

    Time: 9.00am to 3.30pm

    Location: Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin

    Cost: $10 (lunch will be provided)

    Register at www.scifest.org.nz

     

    Otago Polytechnic is proud to sponsor the International Science Festival 2018.

  • The History of the iD International Emerging Designer Fashion Awards (Apr 29 2018)

    Professor Dr Margo Barton is speaking during iD Fashion Week.


    SUNDAY 29 APRIL, 1:00 TO 2:00 PM

    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY


    Margo initiated the iD International Emerging Designer Awards which have been held annually since 2003 and now attract over 150 entries annual from graduates of the top international fashion schools. She is the Creative Director of iD Dunedin Fashion Week 2018. In this presentation Margo will discuss the history of the iD International Emerging Designer Awards since inception.

    Margo is the Academic Leader for Fashion at Otago Polytechnic. She has Dress Design Certificate from TAFE’s Fashion Design Studio in Sydney, Australia, and worked in the fashion industry for many years. Her PhD is from RMIT, Australia. A recipient of a New Zealand Tertiary Teaching Award in 2007, she is passionate about fashion education and establishing networks within the global fashion industry to benefit Design students. Margo’s research, both designing and writing, focusses on the discourse between the designer and the wearer, especially for emerging fashion. This incorporates her Citizen Stylist project work. Her work traverses the interface between physical and digital designing. She is a frequent exhibitor, curator and presenter. Margo has been a member of the Executive Board of iD Fashion Week Dunedin since 2001 and Deputy Chair since 2015. She initiated the iD International Emerging Designer Awards, held annually since 2003, which attract over 150 entries annually from graduates of the top international fashion schools. She is an external examiner for postgraduate students at AUT and Massey University, is on the Course Advisory Board for fashion at TAFE NSW in Australia, and is a member of the executive board of the International Foundation of Fashion Technology Institutes (IFFTI). Margo fosters international exchanges and collaborations for students and faculty.

  • Towards the development of alternatives beyond capitalism (Jun 07 2018)

    Visiting Associate Professor Carla Houkamau presents preliminary findings of the Māori Identity and Financial Attitudes Survey.


    13 SEPTEMBER 2018, 1 - 2 PM

    F209 PUNA KAWA, MASON CENTRE, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN


    Associate Professor Carla Houkamau is from the University of Auckland Business School, University of Auckland. 

    This presentation reports selected preliminary findings of the Māori Identity and Financial Attitudes Study (MIFAS). In October 2017 the MIFAS survey was sent out to 100,000 people registered as being of Māori descent on the New Zealand Electoral Roll and 7000 responded.  The meta-objective of the MIFAS is to explore how personal characteristics (e.g., ethnic identity, social identity beliefs, age, personality, gender) and characteristics within the social, economic and cultural environment influence economic behaviour, values and aspirations among Māori. This talk will contextualise the MIFAS and review current understandings of economic values and aspirations which are distinctive to Māori. Of particular interest will be the expression of Māori perspectives that represent resistance to the mainstream economic values which prevail in New Zealand. An outline of the study methodology will be provided along with an overview of response rate information from the first wave of data collection. 

    Carla Houkamau (PhD) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management and International Business and the Associate Dean for Māori and Pacific Development for the Business School. Being of mixed Māori and Pākehā descent Carla holds a deep personal interest in the history of Māori-Pākehā relations and promoting cultural understanding. Her current research focuses mainly on intergroup relations, chiefly how group memberships influence attitudes and behaviour. Reflecting her role in the Business School her work has broadened to include diversity management, identity economics and implicit bias. Her research using the Multidimensional Model of Māori identity and Cultural Engagement (MMM-ICE) has been recognised nationally and internationally for advancing ethnic identity research using psychometric measures and large samples.

  • Virtual International Day of the Midwife (Apr 12 2018)

    Associate Professor Jean Patterson is presenting on the topic Becoming a midwife: A study of our alumni.


    SATURDAY 5 MAY 2018, 12 NOON

    ONLINE


    The move from student to health professional can be challenging. Graduates from our Bachelor of Midwifery programme complete a blend of face to face, online and practice placement learning. In a 3 year graduate survey completed in 2015 almost all students said they felt well prepared for beginning midwifery practice. The aim of this current research was to ask our graduates about their experiences when beginning midwifery practice, and how well they perceived the programme had prepared them to meet their particular challenges in the workplace. Becoming a midwife requires an adjustment from student to autonomous practitioner. This study provides insights from the perspective of practicing midwives as to the components of their study that prepared them to make this transition.

    Jean is also facilitating some of the other presentations online. See the full programme of presentations here.

     

     

  • Innovation & Number 8 Wire (Apr 10 2018)

    Gavin O'Brien talks about innovators Ernest and Hannah Hayes.


    23 MAY, 5.30PM

    PIONEER WOMEN'S MEMORIAL HALL, 362 MORAY PLACE, DUNEDIN


    Gavin O'Brien is a senior lecturer in Product Design at Otago Polytechnic and has a Masters degree in Applied Science from Otago University. Gavin will be discussing his studies on the work of Ernest Hayes as an industrial designer and Hannah Hayes as a marketing pioneer. The records of Hannah's sales exploits by bicycle into the Maniototo in the late 19th Century are a fascinating insight into the agricultural landscape of the time. Ernest's legacy is the Hayes 'chain grip' wire strainer patented in the early 1920s and awarded a New Zealand design award in 1981. This item is still being widely sold, practically unchanged almost a century after its inception. Together, Ernest and Hannah pioneered product design and marketing within the South Island and are an fascinating example of kiwi ingenuity.

    Please register here for this free event.

    This is an official Techweek’18 event. Techweek is New Zealand’s annual festival of innovation, running nationwide from 19 - 27 May 2018. Read more about other Techweek events.

  • Reliability Improvement Methodology for Subsea Pipeline Construction (Apr 10 2018)

    This seminar for project managers and engineers will discuss reliability risk reduction in construction of oil and gas subsea pipelines.


    22 MAY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM

    O204, O BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, 115 ANZAC AVENUE, DUNEDIN


    Dr Jing Lin will speak about her research developing logic-based methodologies for reliability risk reduction in the engineering field, with particular application to oil and gas subsea pipeline construction in China. This has been her field of research for and since her PhD study.

    Jing is a lecturer in engineering at Dalian Ocean University in China. After an undergraduate degree in Lighting Physics and a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering, Jing worked in international manufacturing. She has seven years’ experience working in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia, including three years in high tech industry in Silicon Valley, California.

    See our campus map here. If you are driving to this event, we recommend that you allow plenty of time to find a park. 

    This is an official Techweek’18 event. Techweek is New Zealand’s annual festival of innovation, running nationwide from 19 - 27 May 2018. Read more about other Techweek events.

  • Imagining the Past, Imagining the Future: What's memory got to do with it? (May 03 2018)

    Chloe Wall, a University of Otago philosophy PhD student presents this seminar.


    3 MAY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    The artist’s imagination is crucial to her ability to produce art. Philosophically, however, imagination is still poorly understood, and consequently so is the relationship between memory and imagination. Among the work that has been done, there has been very little agreement about what the nature and degree of the relationship is. On one end of the spectrum is the claim that the difference between imagination and memory is whether the event in question really happened or not, while on the other end is the claim that remembering just is imagining the past. The question is further complicated by evidence that thinking about future events is subserved by the same cognitive mechanisms that subserve thinking about the past. So, how are remembering, thinking about the future, and imagining different? The purpose of this talk is to provide a broad overview of the different answers to these questions, and to offer some speculations about their plausibility.

    Chloe Wall is a Ph.D. student in Philosophy at the University of Otago. Her research focusses on memory and testimony and compares how they serve as sources of knowledge.

  • Midwifery seminar (Apr 07 2018)

    This is the first of this year's School of Midwifery seminars.


    7 MAY 2018, 1:00 - 1:50 PM
    ONLINE - click here to join


    Photovoice: Application in Education: The first speaker, addressing this topic, will be Megan Walker. Megan is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Midwifery and teaches in both the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.  This presentation will introduce photovoice as a research methodology and as an artistic pedagogical technology.  The presentation covers how this could be introduced into the postgraduate Midwifery Assessment and Decision Making course and implications for education.

     

    Family Violence: The second speaker at this seminar is Laurie Mahoney, a Senior Lecturer in the School of Nursing at Otago Polytechnic. Her main teaching focus is in the primary health care nursing area and her speciality topic if family violence. Laurie also practices as a Public Health Nurse in the Dunedin area, and her knowledge of family violence issues is heavily drawn  from her practice. Laurie will be presenting the importance of screening for intimate partner violence in primary care.

     

     

  • Beca Tech Showcase (Apr 05 2018)

    This showcase provides an opportunity to find out more about technology in real world engineering applications.


    Thursday 24th May 2018 from 10 am – 2 pm

    Students Common Room at L Block, Otago Polytechnic, 100 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin

    Register here


    Professional services consultancy firm Beca is demonstrating virtual reality software, lady bug 360 degree camera, survey laser scanners and drones in real world engineering applications. Beca wants to get Engineering Students excited about the prospect of using some innovative technology in their future careers and to expose people to the technology that Beca has to offer, to capture their imagination about all the cool things we do that can ‘make everyday better’. 

    This is an official Techweek’18 event. Techweek is New Zealand’s annual festival of innovation, running nationwide from 19 - 27 May 2018. Read more about other Techweek events.

  • Minecraft Hour of Code (Mar 27 2018)

    Elise Allen and Paul Admiraal are leading an introductory coding event during TechWeek.


    26 MAY 2018, 1:00PM - 3:00PM

    H611, H BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC

    REGISTER HERE


    Take part in a supervised online tutorial that will help you explore computer coding, working with the popular Minecraft game. In this activity you will use blocks of code to take Steve or Alex on an adventure through their Minecraft world. The Hour of Code is supervised by Elise Allen and Paul Admiraal, both lecturers in Information Technology at Otago Polytechnic. The activity takes approximately one hour.

    This is an official Techweek’18 event. Techweek is New Zealand’s annual festival of innovation, running nationwide from 19 - 27 May 2018. Read more about other Techweek events.

  • The Queerest Quiz for the Queerest Quizzers! (Mar 12 2018)

    Everyone is welcome for a memorable night of glamorous fun and entertainment ... and questions and prizes!


    10 APRIL 2018, 7.00PM

    THE HUB, FORTH STREET CAMPUS, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, DUNEDIN


    Entry is FREE! Register your team (4-6 quizzers) and your team name: proud@op.ac.nz

    Proudly sponsored by:

  • Sustainability in Business (Mar 27 2018)

    What does it mean to be a sustainable business?


    10 APRIL 2018, 5.30 to 8PM

    INNOV8HQ, 123 VOGEL ST, DUNEDIN

    COST: $25 plus GST


    How can your business be more sustainable – in all senses? How do you:

    -          Keep clients?

    -          Strengthen yourself and your staff?

    -          Stay ahead of competitors?

    -          Save energy?

    -          Adopt a sustainability mindset?

    There is something for everyone in this event. Come and learn how you might improve your sustainable business practice.

     Click here to register for this event.

  • Compass Open Recruitment Session (Mar 09 2018)

    The Compass Group are looking for competent and reliable casual front of house staff to work at our sites in Dunedin, including Forsyth Barr Stadium and The Dunedin Centre.

    2018 is shaping up to be a very busy year, with multiple international acts already announced for the Forsyth Barr Stadium. Our expectation is that you will be able to work the majority of all major events, including concerts, rugby games and cricket.
    If you’re our perfect candidate you will be hard working, reliable and flexible in your ability to work, as well as having a friendly, outgoing personality, excellent communication skills and a ‘can do’ attitude.  We have a great team environment and enjoy a laugh while providing excellent service

    If this sounds like you and are interested in finding out more, then please attend our open recruitment session.

    Wednesday 21 March, 12.00pm–1.00pm, The Hub
    Food will be provided

     

    Who are the Compass Group?

    They’re the world’s leading Foodservice Company, providing food and support services across all sectors. This includes everything from school dinners to army meals, and coffee bars to corporate hospitality. Worldwide, we have 400,000 people working for us in 50 countries. In New Zealand our 4000+ great people operate out of circa 350 sites around the country, with further business growth opportunities on the horizon. 

    Great People, Real Opportunities

  • Modernism + Feminism (Mar 03 2018)

    There is a panel discussion at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery this weekend.


     

    3 MARCH 2018, 11:00 - 2:00

    DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY, 30 THE OCTAGON, DUNEDIN


     

    Bridie Lonie, Lecturer in Art History and Theory at Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic, will be participating in the panel discussion with Dr Judith Collard, Senior Lecturer, Department History and Art History, University of Otago; and Dr Rochelle Simmons Department of English & Linguistics, University of Otago. The panel discussion topic is Modernism + Feminism.

  • Public Seminars Term 1 (Feb 22 2018)

    1 MARCH-12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Public Seminar Programme for Term 1, 2018

     

    1 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         
    The Ceramic Practices of Joe Bova (US) and Rob Cloughley (NZ) - Joe Bova and Rob Cloughley

    The presentation by Joe Bova on his Ceramic Art is termed Form and Grace. What the I Ching says about grace is as close to a truth as I know about working with clay:  "The most perfect grace consists not in external ornamentation but in allowing the original material to stand forth, beautified by being given form.”

    In conjunction, Rob Cloughley will be discussing his recent work and practice that has concluded in four collaborative installations of Rob’s ceramic sculptures in combination with Prudence Edge’s Textile sculpture.

    A member of the International Academy of Ceramics, Joe Bova was educated at the University of Houston (BFA, 1967) and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1969). A Professor Emeritus from LSU and Ohio University, in 2011 he was a Fulbright Fellow in Dublin, Ireland. Bova has taught workshops at institutions around the globe, including the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Rhode Island School of Design, Archie Bray Foundation, MT, the College of William and Mary, VA, and the Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center, China. His work is in many public and private collections, including the Arizona State University Art Museum, International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary, the National Collection of Ireland, the Los Angeles County Museum, CA, the Mint Museum of Art, NC, and the Shangyu Museum, China. Joe Bova lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Rob Cloughley has been working with clay for 23 years. He is the Ceramic Diploma Programme Coordinator and Ceramic Studio Coordinator at the Dunedin School of Art. 

     

    8 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Haere Mai to the Highway, a talk about a new project in painting and some of its precedents and inspirations - Tim Croucher

    Recently I’ve been working on paintings that make an exchange between historical events of the colonial period, constructed incidents and my own personal memory and imagination of the places I spent my youth in the Manawatu and Rangatikei and latterly in Waikato and Thames Valley. These paintings have developed from several exhibition projects based on my trips in India and China that reflected on the dislocation and fantasy of travel.

    I’ll show images of works from these projects and some source material from my current work on Haere Mai to the Highway. I’ll talk a bit about my artistic influences and methods too, if that seems relevant to the audience.

    Tim Croucher was born in Longburn, just south of Palmerston North in 1963. He moved to Hamilton to finish high school in 1981, hated it, fell in love and went to Christchurch to study Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury. Tim painted public murals during the 80’s before returning, with some trepidation, to Hamilton to take up a teaching position at the Waikato Polytechnic. He’s worked there ever since teaching Fine Arts. Tim makes paintings for exhibition and shows his work regionally, nationally and internationally. He’s also recently got back into painting public artworks with his wife Tracy. When he can, he goes boating, and rides motorbikes with his family, digging around in the landscape and towns that for him, are iconic to his country.

     

    15 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Collections + Bits and Pieces - Andrea Daly

    My grandfather was Irish living in Scotland. He worked in China where he meet his English wife, to be, and immigrated to New Zealand. He always told stories. Every night after dinner he would enthrall us with Irish Fairy tales and other wonders. Some were obviously fictional but others such as his out of body experience or the seeing of ghosts we were never quite sure about.

    I think I may also be a story teller but forgot to use words. The language of the object and the visual is not one I am fluent in so it is a constant struggle and a fantastic challenge. Sometimes I know what I am saying and other times I am just concentrating on the words and an unexpected story emerges. Looking back over the 33 years of my practice I realise the underlying narrative has always been about me, my fears, interests, fascinations. I have delved into the role of being a young female trying to understand the cultural forces that define me, explored language as political, gendered, structural and constrictive. Wondered if I was an artist using jewellery as my medium or a jeweller and where were the lines and who drew them? And all the time my Catholic past keeps looking for the unexplained, unexpected and impossible. Science is like a wonderland I return to and the human brain unexplored territory, anything is possible.

    But how much can a simple piece of jewellery actually tell us?

    Andrea Daly is a practicing jeweler and tutor who works from her own studio and has been involved in Teaching at various institutions since 1990. She is HOD Jewellery at Hungry Creek and was a Partner in Fingers Jewellery Gallery from 1991 to 2017. She studied in Australia at Sydney College of the Arts completing an undergraduate Bachelor and Post Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts majoring in Contemporary Jewellery. She later went on to complete a Masters in Philosophy First Class Honors majoring in Art History at Auckland University. Andrea exhibits nationally and internationally with works held in both public and private collections.      

     

    22 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses - Steve Lovett

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality.

    Steve Lovett  is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.​

     

    29 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Time-based Moving Image Installation Art and the “Cinema-Situation - Hilary Radner

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, the moving image was confined to a relatively restricted set of viewing situations. Today, this is no longer the case. This intervention will consider the implications of these changes, particularly as they have been explored by the French film theorist Raymond Bellour.

    Hilary Radner is Emerita Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago. Her most recent publications include a co-edited special issue on fashion and the moving image for Fashion Theory (2017) and, with Alistair Fox, Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image (Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

     

    5 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Why Art Matters: Art as Entertainment (and then some) - Patricia Hoffie

    State galleries have demonstrated overwhelming success in rising to the challenge of expanding and extending Australian audiences. Crowds flow through the doors; children drag their parents and minders in to be part of the often lavish extension services programmes they offer and focus groups get special walking-talking tours through exhibitions – often for no cost at all. Along with such success there’s been a growing association of art with entertainment. And while aesthetes and purists might scoff and bemoan that development, the association is hardly a new one. Art has twinned with entertainment in its various manifestations throughout the ages, and it’s often used the close relationship as a means of raising other issues – issues that might require longer and deeper responses than quick cheap thrills.

    This presentation addresses the issue of art and/as entertainment, and raising the question about the extent to which that inhibits or assists the aims of art.

    Prof. Patricia Hoffie AM is a Queensland based artist, writer and curator. Trained as a painter, her practice includes a range of media including installation, assemblage and sculpture. Since her first solo exhibition in Brisbane in 1974, she has exhibited extensively in Australia and internationally For several decades her work has focused on the changing nature of work, especially in relation to shifts in understanding about what might constitute a ‘work of art’ or an ‘artwork’. She has employed the theme Fully Exploited Labour to collate several decades of practice that has examined aspects of the processes whereby greater and lesser values are ascribed to particular areas of cultural production. This body of work has been used to address issues of authorship, belonging, the 'immigration problem' in Australia and a number of other subjects pertinent to the impact of globalisation on notions of 'belonging'. For three years she worked with Dr. Caroline Turner (ANU) on an ARC major grant funded series of projects under the banner Art and Human Rights. Her PhD titled Regional Values: Australian during the 1980s, awarded through University of New South Wales in 1998, has provided a national focus on regional values that has provided a fulcrum for her later work examining Australia's role in the Asia-Pacific region, a subject she researched actively through early involvement in the formative years of the Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, for which she worked as a curator and writer.

     

    12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    This seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5:00PM.


    Understanding -- Art and Research - Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz and Anna Vasof

    Artistic Research is one of the core activities at the University of Applied Arts Vienna (Die Angewandte). In view of the Angewandte`s exhibition Understanding Art and Research which will be opened on 12 April in the Dunedin School of Art Gallery, the seminar will provide an overview into the Angewandte`s approach regarding art and research activities respectively, including the exchange of personal insights via specific case scenarios. Colleagues participating in the exhibition will be present. President Gerald Bast opens with  “Surviving in the Digital Age: Why humans need art-based approaches for not to getting lost in transition“. Afterwards colleagues will present individual approaches to their art and research activities including aspects regarding collaborative projects: Cornelia Bast: “Art, Dementia and Empathy”, Konrad Strutz: “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics“ and Anna Vasof, with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of her project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz, and Anna Vasof are colleagues from the Dunedin School of Art exchange partner institution Die Angewandte (University of Applied Arts) in Vienna Austria.

    The seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5pm.

    12 April afternoon workshop from 2.30pm

    Colleagues from the Angewandte`s in Vienna will present a video by Anna Vasof with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of Anna’s project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Anna Vasof is an architect and media artist. Born in 1985, she studied architecture at the University of Thessaly (2010) in Greece and Transmedia Art (2014) at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Since 2004 her videos and short movies have been presented in several festivals, some of them winning distinctions. She’s currently writing Ph.D. thesis at the University of applied arts in Vienna about an animation technique that she develops and at the same time working on designing and building innovative mechanisms for producing critical videos, actions and installations.

    Dr. Gerald Bast is President of University of Applied Arts Vienna since 2000. Amongst other functions he held in the field of Higher Education and Research for many years he is currently member in the Representative Board of ELIA - European League of the Arts, member in the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, Editor-in-chief of the book series "Arts, Research, Innovation and Society" at Springer International Publisher. Before he became President of the "Angewandte" where he planned and implemented numerous new programmes in teaching and research, Bast was responsible for drafting the legislation for major university reforms in times when he was engaged at the Federal Ministry for Higher Education.

    Cornelia Bast is an artist, social designer and art-based researcher at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. She graduated from a Higher Biochemistry School, worked as a midwife at the University Clinic Vienna and earned a BA in Applied Arts and Design Communication and an MA in Social Design – Arts as Urban Innovation at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Her work oscillates between art, design and public performative interventions. She sees art and design primarily as media for social communication. Working in cooperation with non-profit institutions deepen insight into problems and strengthen the impact of her work. She is on the editorial board of dérive – Radio for Urban Research, and has presented her work at various international conferences.

    Konrad Strutz is a visual artist and a senior lecturer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Areas of focus in his scientific and artistic work include non-hierarchical spatial representations, and body movement in the context of communication. He received his academic education in fine arts and in computer science from the Vienna Technical University and the University of Applied Arts Vienna, respectively. Konrad‘s artwork is exhibited in Europe as well as overseas on a regular basis. Besides his position as a faculty member and a fellow of the Volkswagen foundation’s program “Arts and Science in Motion”, Konrad is currently involved in the symposium “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics” to be held in Berlin this year. www.konradstrutz.com

  • Public Seminars Term 1 (Feb 22 2018)

     

     

     

     

    Public Seminars Term 1 (Feb 12 2018)

     

     

     

     

    1 MARCH-12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Public Seminar Programme for Term 1, 2018

     

    1 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         
    The Ceramic Practices of Joe Bova (US) and Rob Cloughley (NZ) - Joe Bova and Rob Cloughley

    The presentation by Joe Bova on his Ceramic Art is termed Form and Grace. What the I Ching says about grace is as close to a truth as I know about working with clay:  "The most perfect grace consists not in external ornamentation but in allowing the original material to stand forth, beautified by being given form.”

    In conjunction, Rob Cloughley will be discussing his recent work and practice that has concluded in four collaborative installations of Rob’s ceramic sculptures in combination with Prudence Edge’s Textile sculpture.

    A member of the International Academy of Ceramics, Joe Bova was educated at the University of Houston (BFA, 1967) and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1969). A Professor Emeritus from LSU and Ohio University, in 2011 he was a Fulbright Fellow in Dublin, Ireland. Bova has taught workshops at institutions around the globe, including the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Rhode Island School of Design, Archie Bray Foundation, MT, the College of William and Mary, VA, and the Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center, China. His work is in many public and private collections, including the Arizona State University Art Museum, International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary, the National Collection of Ireland, the Los Angeles County Museum, CA, the Mint Museum of Art, NC, and the Shangyu Museum, China. Joe Bova lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Rob Cloughley has been working with clay for 23 years. He is the Ceramic Diploma Programme Coordinator and Ceramic Studio Coordinator at the Dunedin School of Art. 

     

    8 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Haere Mai to the Highway, a talk about a new project in painting and some of its precedents and inspirations - Tim Croucher

    Recently I’ve been working on paintings that make an exchange between historical events of the colonial period, constructed incidents and my own personal memory and imagination of the places I spent my youth in the Manawatu and Rangatikei and latterly in Waikato and Thames Valley. These paintings have developed from several exhibition projects based on my trips in India and China that reflected on the dislocation and fantasy of travel.

    I’ll show images of works from these projects and some source material from my current work on Haere Mai to the Highway. I’ll talk a bit about my artistic influences and methods too, if that seems relevant to the audience.

    Tim Croucher was born in Longburn, just south of Palmerston North in 1963. He moved to Hamilton to finish high school in 1981, hated it, fell in love and went to Christchurch to study Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury. Tim painted public murals during the 80’s before returning, with some trepidation, to Hamilton to take up a teaching position at the Waikato Polytechnic. He’s worked there ever since teaching Fine Arts. Tim makes paintings for exhibition and shows his work regionally, nationally and internationally. He’s also recently got back into painting public artworks with his wife Tracy. When he can, he goes boating, and rides motorbikes with his family, digging around in the landscape and towns that for him, are iconic to his country.

     

    15 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Collections + Bits and Pieces - Andrea Daly

    My grandfather was Irish living in Scotland. He worked in China where he meet his English wife, to be, and immigrated to New Zealand. He always told stories. Every night after dinner he would enthrall us with Irish Fairy tales and other wonders. Some were obviously fictional but others such as his out of body experience or the seeing of ghosts we were never quite sure about.

    I think I may also be a story teller but forgot to use words. The language of the object and the visual is not one I am fluent in so it is a constant struggle and a fantastic challenge. Sometimes I know what I am saying and other times I am just concentrating on the words and an unexpected story emerges. Looking back over the 33 years of my practice I realise the underlying narrative has always been about me, my fears, interests, fascinations. I have delved into the role of being a young female trying to understand the cultural forces that define me, explored language as political, gendered, structural and constrictive. Wondered if I was an artist using jewellery as my medium or a jeweller and where were the lines and who drew them? And all the time my Catholic past keeps looking for the unexplained, unexpected and impossible. Science is like a wonderland I return to and the human brain unexplored territory, anything is possible.

    But how much can a simple piece of jewellery actually tell us?

    Andrea Daly is a practicing jeweler and tutor who works from her own studio and has been involved in Teaching at various institutions since 1990. She is HOD Jewellery at Hungry Creek and was a Partner in Fingers Jewellery Gallery from 1991 to 2017. She studied in Australia at Sydney College of the Arts completing an undergraduate Bachelor and Post Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts majoring in Contemporary Jewellery. She later went on to complete a Masters in Philosophy First Class Honors majoring in Art History at Auckland University. Andrea exhibits nationally and internationally with works held in both public and private collections.      

     

    22 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses - Steve Lovett

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality.

    Steve Lovett  is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.​

     

    29 MARCH, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Time-based Moving Image Installation Art and the “Cinema-Situation - Hilary Radner

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, the moving image was confined to a relatively restricted set of viewing situations. Today, this is no longer the case. This intervention will consider the implications of these changes, particularly as they have been explored by the French film theorist Raymond Bellour.

    Hilary Radner is Emerita Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago. Her most recent publications include a co-edited special issue on fashion and the moving image for Fashion Theory (2017) and, with Alistair Fox, Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image (Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

     

    5 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    Why Art Matters: Art as Entertainment (and then some) - Patricia Hoffie

    State galleries have demonstrated overwhelming success in rising to the challenge of expanding and extending Australian audiences. Crowds flow through the doors; children drag their parents and minders in to be part of the often lavish extension services programmes they offer and focus groups get special walking-talking tours through exhibitions – often for no cost at all. Along with such success there’s been a growing association of art with entertainment. And while aesthetes and purists might scoff and bemoan that development, the association is hardly a new one. Art has twinned with entertainment in its various manifestations throughout the ages, and it’s often used the close relationship as a means of raising other issues – issues that might require longer and deeper responses than quick cheap thrills.

    This presentation addresses the issue of art and/as entertainment, and raising the question about the extent to which that inhibits or assists the aims of art.

    Prof. Patricia Hoffie AM is a Queensland based artist, writer and curator. Trained as a painter, her practice includes a range of media including installation, assemblage and sculpture. Since her first solo exhibition in Brisbane in 1974, she has exhibited extensively in Australia and internationally For several decades her work has focused on the changing nature of work, especially in relation to shifts in understanding about what might constitute a ‘work of art’ or an ‘artwork’. She has employed the theme Fully Exploited Labour to collate several decades of practice that has examined aspects of the processes whereby greater and lesser values are ascribed to particular areas of cultural production. This body of work has been used to address issues of authorship, belonging, the 'immigration problem' in Australia and a number of other subjects pertinent to the impact of globalisation on notions of 'belonging'. For three years she worked with Dr. Caroline Turner (ANU) on an ARC major grant funded series of projects under the banner Art and Human Rights. Her PhD titled Regional Values: Australian during the 1980s, awarded through University of New South Wales in 1998, has provided a national focus on regional values that has provided a fulcrum for her later work examining Australia's role in the Asia-Pacific region, a subject she researched actively through early involvement in the formative years of the Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, for which she worked as a curator and writer.

     

    12 APRIL, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)
    This seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5:00PM.


    Understanding -- Art and Research - Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz and Anna Vasof

    Artistic Research is one of the core activities at the University of Applied Arts Vienna (Die Angewandte). In view of the Angewandte`s exhibition Understanding Art and Research which will be opened on 12 April in the Dunedin School of Art Gallery, the seminar will provide an overview into the Angewandte`s approach regarding art and research activities respectively, including the exchange of personal insights via specific case scenarios. Colleagues participating in the exhibition will be present. President Gerald Bast opens with  “Surviving in the Digital Age: Why humans need art-based approaches for not to getting lost in transition“. Afterwards colleagues will present individual approaches to their art and research activities including aspects regarding collaborative projects: Cornelia Bast: “Art, Dementia and Empathy”, Konrad Strutz: “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics“ and Anna Vasof, with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of her project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Gerald Bast, Cornelia Bast, Konrad Strutz, and Anna Vasof are colleagues from the Dunedin School of Art exchange partner institution Die Angewandte (University of Applied Arts) in Vienna Austria.

    The seminar will continue in the afternoon with a workshop also open to the public from 2.30-5pm.

    12 April afternoon workshop from 2.30pm

    Colleagues from the Angewandte`s in Vienna will present a video by Anna Vasof with first hand insight into the University´s PhD in Art Programme based on the development of Anna’s project “Non-Stop Stop-Motion”.

    Anna Vasof is an architect and media artist. Born in 1985, she studied architecture at the University of Thessaly (2010) in Greece and Transmedia Art (2014) at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Since 2004 her videos and short movies have been presented in several festivals, some of them winning distinctions. She’s currently writing Ph.D. thesis at the University of applied arts in Vienna about an animation technique that she develops and at the same time working on designing and building innovative mechanisms for producing critical videos, actions and installations.

    Dr. Gerald Bast is President of University of Applied Arts Vienna since 2000. Amongst other functions he held in the field of Higher Education and Research for many years he is currently member in the Representative Board of ELIA - European League of the Arts, member in the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, Editor-in-chief of the book series "Arts, Research, Innovation and Society" at Springer International Publisher. Before he became President of the "Angewandte" where he planned and implemented numerous new programmes in teaching and research, Bast was responsible for drafting the legislation for major university reforms in times when he was engaged at the Federal Ministry for Higher Education.

    Cornelia Bast is an artist, social designer and art-based researcher at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. She graduated from a Higher Biochemistry School, worked as a midwife at the University Clinic Vienna and earned a BA in Applied Arts and Design Communication and an MA in Social Design – Arts as Urban Innovation at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Her work oscillates between art, design and public performative interventions. She sees art and design primarily as media for social communication. Working in cooperation with non-profit institutions deepen insight into problems and strengthen the impact of her work. She is on the editorial board of dérive – Radio for Urban Research, and has presented her work at various international conferences.

    Konrad Strutz is a visual artist and a senior lecturer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Areas of focus in his scientific and artistic work include non-hierarchical spatial representations, and body movement in the context of communication. He received his academic education in fine arts and in computer science from the Vienna Technical University and the University of Applied Arts Vienna, respectively. Konrad‘s artwork is exhibited in Europe as well as overseas on a regular basis. Besides his position as a faculty member and a fellow of the Volkswagen foundation’s program “Arts and Science in Motion”, Konrad is currently involved in the symposium “The Entanglement between Gesture, Media and Politics” to be held in Berlin this year. www.konradstrutz.com

  • Employing a builder (Mar 02 2018)

    David Finnie considers when can a builder claim more time or money?


    28 MARCH 2018, 12:00 NOON - 1:00PM

    D102, D BLOCK, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, HARBOUR TERRACE, DUNEDIN


    David's career in the construction industry began as an apprentice carpenter. During this time, he studied Quantity Surveying and worked as a Contracts Manager for seven years. David has been teaching since 2010, and has written articles for the Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building and New Zealand Construction News. His continuing studies at Massey University and close industry liaison help him to keep Otago Polytechnics Quantity Surveying and Construction Management diplomas leading edge.

    Read more about David's current research here.

     

  • Mumpreneurs - A Journey to Success (Feb 22 2018)

    Dr Jo Kirkwood is speaking to the Women in Business group in Dunedin about women entrepreneurs.


    15 MARCH 2018, 7:00-8:30PM

    PETRIDISH, LEVEL 2, 8 STAFFORD STREET, DUNEDIN

    Email us to register for this event


    Jo has been researching women entrepreneurs for nearly 20 years and will share some of the highlights of her work – particularly around how women define success in business, self-confidence issues, and strategies for managing a business and work/family.  Most recently, Jo has been working on understanding more about mumpreneurs – women who start businesses when they have young children and she will share ways that the women she studied make this successful.

    Dr Jo Kirkwood has been working in higher education in New Zealand for the past 18 years. She is experienced in teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and has particular interests and expertise in facilitation, academic mentoring and assessment at the Masters and Doctoral levels. In her early career, Jo worked as a Policy Advisor at the Ministry of Commerce (now MBIE) where she was involved as auction manager for the world’s first internet auction of radio spectrum. Jo graduated with her PhD from the University of Otago in 2004. Her thesis was focused on gender differences in motivations for entrepreneurship. Jo’s present research interests are around women entrepreneurs/mumpreneurs, Tall Poppy Syndrome and its impact on entrepreneurs, and sustainable entrepreneurs/ecopreneurs. Jo’s work is widely published in academic journals and textbooks, and practitioner publications such as NZ Business and NZ Entrepreneur. 

    Jo currently specialises in facilitating and mentoring Postgraduate Learners on the Master of Professional Practice and Doctor of Professional practice programmes. She has supervised almost 100 Masters and Doctoral students to completion and acts as an external assessor for various institutions’ postgraduate programmes. Jo is based in Dunedin, but works with learners all over the country. Jo offers flexibility in terms of when meetings occur to suit the learner. Jo is the Programme Leader for the Doctor of Professional Practice and is a mentor on this programme as well as overseeing the administrative side of our Doctoral learners.

    Read more about Jo's work here.

     

     

  • Cinema Situation (Mar 29 2018)

    Emerita Professor Hilary Radner considers changes in how we view the moving image.


     

    29 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


     

    Time-based Moving Image Installation Art and the “Cinema-Situation”

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, the moving image was confined to a relatively restricted set of viewing situations. Today, this is no longer the case. This intervention will consider the implications of these changes, particularly as they have been explored by the French film theorist Raymond Bellour.

    Hilary Radner

    Hilary Radner is Emerita Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago. Her most recent publications include a co-edited special issue on fashion and the moving image for Fashion Theory (2017) and, with Alistair Fox, Raymond Bellour: Cinema and the Moving Image (Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

  • Defining literacy and criticality (Mar 22 2018)

    Steve Lovett examines literacy and criticality in art and design.


    22 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses.

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice, criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality

    Steve Lovett

    Steve Lovett is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.

  • Collections + Bits and Pieces (Mar 15 2018)

    Come and hear Andrea Daly speak about her jewellery practice.


    15 MARCH 2018, 12:00-1:00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    "My grandfather was Irish living in Scotland. He worked in China where he meet his English wife, to be, and immigrated to New Zealand. He always told stories. Every night after dinner he would enthrall us with Irish Fairy tales and other wonders. Some were obviously fictional but others such as his out of body experience or the seeing of ghosts we were never quite sure about.

    "I think I may also be a story teller but forgot to use words. The language of the object and the visual is not one I am fluent in so it is a constant struggle and a fantastic challenge. Sometimes I know what I am saying and other times I am just concentrating on the words and an unexpected story emerges. Looking back over the 33 years of my practice I realise the underlying narrative has always been about me, my fears, interests, fascinations. I have delved into the role of being a young female trying to understand the cultural forces that define me, explored language as political, gendered, structural and constrictive. Wondered if I was an artist using jewellery as my medium or a jeweller and where were the lines and who drew them? And all the time my Catholic past keeps looking for the unexplained, unexpected and impossible. Science is like a wonderland I return to and the human brain unexplored territory, anything is possible.

    "But how much can a simple piece of jewellery actually tell us?"

    Andrea Daly is a practicing jeweler and tutor who works from her own studio and has been involved in Teaching at various institutions since 1990. She is HOD Jewellery at Hungry Creek and was a Partner in Fingers Jewellery Gallery from 1991 to 2017. She studied in Australia at Sydney College of the Arts completing an undergraduate Bachelor and Post Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts majoring in Contemporary Jewellery. She later went on to complete a Masters in Philosophy First Class Honors majoring in Art History at Auckland University. Andrea exhibits nationally and internationally with works held in both public and private collections.   

  • The Highway (Mar 08 2018)

    Haere mai to Tim Croucher's Highway, a talk about a new project in painting and some of its precedents and inspirations.


    8 MARCH 2018, 12 NOON - 1.00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    "Recently I’ve been working on paintings that make an exchange between historical events of the colonial period, constructed incidents and my own personal memory and imagination of the places I spent my youth in the Manawatu and Rangatikei and latterly in Waikato and Thames Valley. These paintings have developed from several exhibition projects based on my trips in India and China that reflected on the dislocation and fantasy of travel.

    "I’ll show images of works from these projects and some source material from my current work on Haere Mai to the Highway. I’ll talk a bit about my artistic influences and methods too, if that seems relevant to the audience."

    Tim Croucher

    Tim Croucher was born in Longburn, just south of Palmerston North in 1963. He moved to Hamilton to finish high school in 1981, hated it, fell in love and went to Christchurch to study Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury. Tim painted public murals during the 80’s before returning, with some trepidation, to Hamilton to take up a teaching position at the Waikato Polytechnic. He’s worked there ever since teaching Fine Arts. Tim makes paintings for exhibition and shows his work regionally, nationally and internationally. He’s also recently got back into painting public artworks with his wife Tracy. When he can, he goes boating, and rides motorbikes with his family, digging around in the landscape and towns that for him, are iconic to his country. 

  • Ceramic Practices (Mar 01 2018)

    Our Thursday art seminar series begins at the start of March with The Ceramic Practices of Joe Bova (US) and Rob Cloughley (NZ).


    1 MARCH 2018, 12 NOON -1.00PM

    P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    The presentation by Joe Bova on his Ceramic Art is termed Form and Grace. What the I Ching says about grace is as close to a truth as I know about working with clay:  "The most perfect grace consists not in external ornamentation but in allowing the original material to stand forth, beautified by being given form.”

    In conjunction, Rob Cloughley will be discussing his recent work and practice that has concluded in four collaborative installations of Rob’s ceramic sculptures in combination with Prudence Edge’s Textile sculpture.

    A member of the International Academy of Ceramics, Joe Bova was educated at the University of Houston (BFA, 1967) and the University of New Mexico (MA, 1969). A Professor Emeritus from LSU and Ohio University, in 2011 he was a Fulbright Fellow in Dublin, Ireland. Bova has taught workshops at institutions around the globe, including the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, University of Georgia’s Cortona Italy Program, Rhode Island School of Design, Archie Bray Foundation, MT, the College of William and Mary, VA, and the Shangyu Celadon Modern International Ceramic Art Center, China. His work is in many public and private collections, including the Arizona State University Art Museum, International Ceramics Studio, Kecskemet, Hungary, the National Collection of Ireland, the Los Angeles County Museum, CA, the Mint Museum of Art, NC, and the Shangyu Museum, China. Joe Bova lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Rob Cloughley has been working with clay for 23 years. He is the Ceramic Diploma Programme Coordinator and Ceramic Studio Coordinator at the Dunedin School of Art. 

  • Supporting Mental Health in the Workplace (Feb 27 2018)

    Lecturer Jodie Black is presenting on this topical subject at the next Dunedin meeting of the Human Resources Institute of New Zealand.


    27 FEBRUARY 2018, 5.30 - 7.00PM

    OTAGO POLYTECHNIC, FORTH STREET, DUNEDIN

    COST: $25 plus GST ($20 for HRINZ members, free for HRINZ student members)


    Jodie will to provide practical, up to date information about supporting mental health in the workplace, drawing on international research and her experiences from working in this field.

    Networking to begin at 5:30 pm. Jodie will speak from 6pm.

    About The Presenter

    Jodie currently works as a Lecturer at Otago Polytechnic, teaching on the Counsellor training programme. Jodie has previously worked as the Suicide Prevention Coordinator with the Southern District Health Board and more recently assisted the University of Otago to develop a suite of training packages to support mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Jodie is currently enrolled in a Masters in Commerce to explore the use of manufacturing quality improvement approaches in the mental health and addictions sector.

    Click here to register yourself for this event

    Click here to register several people or somebody else for this event

    Image credit: Sarah Barker, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

  • Information Day - It's not too late to enrol for 2018! (Jan 29 2018)

    We are accepting applications for a number of our first and second semester programmes – so find out why studying at Otago Polytechnic all adds up!

    Whether you have a career in mind, you are not sure which one would best suit your skills and interests or you are looking to gain the foundation skills to take on further study – come along to our information day and find out about our study options. 

    Tuesday, February 13

    4.00pm to 5.30pm

    The Hub, Ground Floor, H Block, Forth Street

    Map

  • Lithography - an enduring rarity (Jan 18 2018)

    Artist Neil Emmerson looks at how lithography has remained relevant in the visual arts and still offers artists a range of expressive qualities unique to its principles and process.


    SUNDAY 28 JANUARY 2018 2PM 

    VENUE: Toitū Otago Settlers Museum


    Lithography had its day briefly until photography became the dominant feature of pictorial reproduction. However, if not in popular culture, it has remained relevant in the visual arts and still offers artists a range of expressive qualities unique to its principles and process. Practicality has been replaced with particularity and artists who engage in Print seek it out and utilise it for the production of limited edition prints that come out of professional studio workshops.

    Neil Emmerson is a Senior Lecturer and coordinates the Print Studio at the Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic. Neil has a Master in Visual Arts from the Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney. His research expertise spans a broad range of Printrelated technologies, Identity Politics, Queer Theory, and Gay and Lesbian History. According to Kirsty Grant (Curator, Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Victoria), his subject matter is political, both in terms of the critical focus it directs towards aspects of contemporary social and cultural life, and through its consistent projection of gay experience into the public realm (excerpt from Contemporary Australian Printmaking). He has been selected for numerous print related survey exhibitions at major public galleries in Australia and New Zealand since the 1990s and his work is held in the collections of major public institutions like the Auckland Art Gallery, Australian National Gallery in Canberra, the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. In 2006 he was awarded the Fremantle Print Award. He has been an artist in residence with Cork Printmakers in Ireland in 2013, and at RMIT University in Melbourne in 2016.

     

     

  • Insider Knowledge & Collaboration (Feb 07 2018)

    We are pleased to be hosting a visit from international scholar Professor Vaneeta D'Andrea.


    7 FEBRUARY 2018, 5.30 - 6.30PM, THE HUB, FORTH STREET, OTAGO POLYTECHNIC

    FREE EVENT


    Keys to Success in Tertiary Education: Insider Knowledge & Collaboration

    The focus of this discussion will be lessons learned over a near 50 year career in Tertiary Education. The keys to the success of staff and institutions in this sector are understanding the expectations for all work carried out (insider knowledge) and the value of collaborating in as many ways as possible. Examples from the career of Professor Emerita Vaneeta D’Andrea will provide real life lessons on how to be successful in Tertiary Education settings. Her career spans fifty years and posts on several continents. 

    Professor Vaneeta D'Andrea is Professor Emerita at the University of the Arts London, a Carnegie Scholar with extensive experience in International Higher Education. She has led Learning and Teaching development and operations for international sector bodies and universities in the United States and the United Kingdom. She is a co-author of Improving Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, which advocates the Quality Development model for driving improvement in tertiary education. She currently divides her time between the California and London, UK,  facilitating global consultancy  - her current work with government bodies and education providers spans The Americas, Europe, Asia and the Pacific region. 

     

  • Foundation Learning information sessions coming to a library near you (Dec 14 2017)

    Keen to do further study or enter the workforce – but need to polish up on some basic skills?

    .... and your fees could be free*!

    Our practical, supportive Foundation Learning programmes can help improve your English, Numeracy, Computer skills, Study skills, and Employment skills.

    We also offer electives that will help you pursue a career in a number of key industries including health, beauty therapy, tourism and engineering.

    Find out more at our information sessions:

    Tuesday 16 January

    • Balclutha Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • Milton Library – 11.30am to 12.00pm

    Wednesday 17 January

    • Mosgiel Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • South Dunedin Library – 11.30am to 12.00pm

    Thursday 18 January

    • Dunedin Public Library – 10.00am to 10.30am
    • Waikouaiti Library – 2.00pm to 2.30pm

    Find out more about our Foundation Learning programmes

    *Conditions apply

  • Parents' and Whānau Information Evening (Sep 10 2018)

    Is your son, daughter or member of your whānau looking to study at a tertiary level?

    Not sure what their options are or what they are embarking on? 

    Come along to our Parents' and Whānau information evening

    Regardless of what stage your son, daughter or whānau member is at in deciding where to study – this evening is for all parents and whānau who are wanting to help make an informed decision about their education options and the unique and successful learning environment we offer.

    Find out about the support services we offer, how our career pathways can work for every learner (and a range of NCEA scores), available scholarships, the success stories of our students and graduates and how our Level 7 qualifications are the same as a university degree. Our Heads of Colleges and their representatives will be available to speak about the programmes they deliver and you can talk to our students about their study experiences. Our support staff can also answer any questions you might have about our learning support services, fees and careers guidance.

    Let us show you how Otago Polytechnic all adds up at this informative evening:

    Tuesday, October 23
    The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street
    5.30pm to 7.00pm (presentation from 5.45pm to 6.15pm)

     

  • Careers in Healthcare Expo (Jun 25 2018)

    Want to work as a healthcare professional?

    Our Careers in Healthcare Expo is your opportunity to explore your healthcare career options at our expo and range of informative seminars. Learn about our healthcare programmes, what you need to do to apply to study in 2019 – and speak to our qualified staff, healthcare practitioners and industry professionals about your healthcare career aspirations.

    Find out more about our Health programmes:

    • Nursing
    • Midwifery
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Social Services (Counselling, Career Practice, Disability Support and Coordination, Human Services, Mental Health Support Work)
    • Sport and Exercise
    • Massage Therapy
    • Degree and Diploma bridging option

    Date: Thursday, 2 August

    Time: 5.30pm-7.00pm

    Location: The Hub, Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin (map)

     

  • Dunedin Tertiary Open Day 2018 (Mar 21 2018)

    The Dunedin tertiary institutions will be holding their annual Tertiary Open Day on Monday 7 May 2018.

    This Open Day is a great opportunity to visit our Dunedin campuses, attend talks from our academic schools, tour our impressive facilities, and visit the residential colleges. There will be fun, interactive sessions going on throughout the day, so come along and find out why Dunedin is such a great place to study!

     

    Our programme 

     

     

    Helpful guides for Tertiary Open Day 2018:

     

    Programme timetable


    Otago Polytechnic campus map


    The Hub event map


    Otago Polytechnic - Tertiary Open Day 2018 booklet


    Programme Guide 2018


     

     

     Talk to us about your study plan: liaison@op.ac.nz 

News

  • Career Guidance Day (May 14 2018)

    Tuesday, 19 June   \   9.30am to 1.00pm   \  The Hub, F Block, Forth Street


    Not sure what your best career and study options are?

    We understand starting tertiary study and/or a new career can be daunting. That’s why we have our experienced Career Practitioners on hand to help you explore your options at our Career Guidance Day.

    We’ll help you find a career that fits your values, goals and interests – and discuss your career options and/or a possible course of study.

    The day includes:

    • Career Guidance – Get advice on your career pathway from our experienced team.
    • Student Support – Talk to our team about the learning support services we offer.
    • Campus Tours – Explore our facilities if you are not familiar with our campus.
    • Foundation Learning – Talk to our team about our range of programmes that can help you staircase into tertiary study or seek employment.
    • Student Loans and Allowances – Drop-in and let us help you.

    Whether you want to explore your career options or you are looking to enrol in a programme of study – everyone is welcome! Find our more about our Career Guidance support services here.

  • Public Seminar: Literacy and criticality in art and design (Mar 19 2018)

    22 MARCH12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)


    Towards definitions of literacy and criticality in first year art and design courses.

    As students in tertiary art and design course synthesize a diverse range of information to develop concepts for their practice, criticality is the core skill that they are required to develop. Steve Lovett’s current research examines definitions of literacy to include different forms of media visual cultures, text based information and communication technologies and new media, as a means to better understand literacy education in art and design programmes and therefore how to better enable the development of criticality

    Steve Lovett

    Steve Lovett is an artist and educator. He set up the INKubator Print Research Lab at Manukau Institute of Technology in Auckland. In 22 years teaching in South Auckland, Lovett also designed and delivered a Foundation Education in the Visual Arts Programme. Lovett is now at Elam School of Fine Arts managing the redesign of the print facilities there.

     

     

  • Welcome Back - ART Week 1 Timetable (Feb 12 2018)

    Welcome to the 2018 year. The first day for Year One, Two, NEW Bachelor of Visual Arts Year Three and Graduate Diploma students is: Monday 19th February 2018 at 9am. 

    Come to Room P152 at the Dunedin School of Art buildings, Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Leith block, Building P, main entrance off Riego Street.

    P Block is located between Riego Street, Anzac Avenue and The Water of Leith. See map.

     

    Monday 19th February from 9:00AM

     9:00AM Welcome & Introduction to the school by Acting Head of School Clive Humphreys, DSA Students, Andrew Last & all staff: Room P152 Rūma Kauhau. This will be followed by an introduction to the timetable for the week.

    10:00AM Art school tours

    11.30AM Art BBQ at P Block Main entrance

    1:00PM The Drawing Thing: Meet at O Block with Michelle Beevors and Kiri Mitchell.

    (concurrently Cumberland Street students will be having a tour of the art school campus )

    2.30PM Mihi Whakatau for all students: The Hub, main Otago Polytechnic Building, Forth Street

     3:00PM ID cards: The Hub

     

    Tuesday 20th Februaryfrom 9:00AM

    Powhiri for Māori Students & Gallery Tours

    Powhiri will be held at Puketeraki Marae in Karitane on Tuesday 20 February. We have ordered a bus, which will depart from Manaaki at 9.00AM.  Please RSVP to tepunakaowheo@op.ac.nz to reserve a seat.

    9:00AM and 3:00PM Gallery activities: Meet at P152 for directions

     

    Wednesday 21st February from 10.30AM

    10.30AM  Art History & Theory 1:  Meet in P152

    10.30AM  New BVA3 & Graduate Diploma Students Intro:  P201

     

    Thursday 22nd February from 9:00AM

     9:00AM BVA2 meet in your Studio areas

    10:00AM BVA1 and other NEW students Curriculum & Calendar Information in P152 with Mark Bolland, Undergraduate Programme Manager.

     1:00PM Film Sessions and workshops followed by drinks and light refreshments.

    Programme arranged by Michael Morley and David Green. Screening rooms will be P152, P201, P202.

     

    Friday 23rd February

     9:00AM Introductions to Otago Polytechnic support staff and resources, including Student Success, counsellors, etc. Meet in P152.

    Followed by IT Inductions & H&S: P152 & P103 Computer lab.

     

     

  • Village apartment spots available (Jan 19 2018)

    As the opening date of our new on-campus Student Village looms, so does the opportunity to sign up for a unique Dunedin experience – apartment living that offers all the benefits of communal flatting but none of the downsides.

    Otago Polytechnic’s Student Village, which officially opens on Sunday 11 February, is just a short walk from campus and minutes from the city centre.

    The five-storey, 231-bed furnished residential hub comprises fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. The dorms and studios are full, but we have several apartment bedrooms still available.

    The apartments would suit students wanting to live with friends (a group can request to live together) or those looking to make new friends while living in a safe and secure environment.

    In addition to each student having a fully furnished bedroom, the apartments offer two bathrooms, and there is plenty of space for friends to visit, including access to communal areas (yay, pool tables!).

    Internet and power are included in the price, too, meaning no surprise bills . . . and no arguments.

    For more information, visit here.

  • Success Story: Sajith Abeysingha (Oct 15 2018)

    Graduate Sajith Abeysingha has found the perfect job with the help of OPAIC’s Corporate Relations Team.

    Sajith has a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Sri Lanka and almost four years of experience in the field.  

    He decided to come to OPAIC and study the Graduate Diploma in Applied Management because he wanted to improve his project management skills. His research showed OPAIC was a highly ranked institute.

    Sajith says he hadn’t done any business-related study prior to coming to OPAIC but the lecturers helped him to improve his knowledge in the area.

    He eventually became a top student and was acknowledged for his efforts at the school’s Top Achievers Awards.

    Sajith then found the perfect position for his internship at a project management consultancy firm.

    The Corporate Relations Team at OPAIC identified his key areas and helped him find the internship at Elementary Consultant Solutions.

    “I learned so many things there. In New Zealand there are so many new things happening in the construction industry.”

    Since completing his qualification in May, Sajith’s secured a job as a site engineer at CMP Construction with the help of the Corporate Relations Team.

     “It’s so hard to find a job, for a newcomer, but with the help of the placement team it’s become so easy. So I found a job which is perfect for me.”

    He says he brings his experience as well as his new academic knowledge to the job, “because it’s a mix of management skills and the engineering skills. So I’m using both of those skills to do my tasks and duties,” he says.

    Sajith says the OPAIC staff are always helping students. He says the school is growing and has a good future.

    He advises those coming here for their study to give it 100 percent: “It will pay off for you.”

  • Outstanding success at WOW Awards (Oct 15 2018)

    When Otago Polytechnic’s distance Ceramics teacher, Tatyanna Meharry, and her sister Natasha English, won this year’s Supreme World of Wearable Art (WOW) Award, they became the only artists to win the coveted top award twice.

    Tatyanna and Natasha’s winning entry, WAR sTOrY, is a powerful reflection on the human costs of World War One, in which 128,000 New Zealanders served and 18,000 lost their lives. This year is the centenary of the war’s end.

    “WOW is about storytelling, and we wanted to share an important story about New Zealand’s past,” Tatyanna says. “Our costume features a toy soldier in a toy box, accompanied by a younger person carrying the weight of that history.”

    WOW founder and head judge Dame Suzie Moncrieff said WAR sTOrY was "flawless in execution".

    Tatyanna and Natasha previously won the Supreme Award in 2013 with their entry The Exchange, which represented the partnership created by the Treaty of Waitangi.

    “It’s an amazing feeling to win again,” Tayanna says. “WAR sTOrY was five years in the making, so it’s really satisfying as well.”

    Tatyanna is also a graduate of Dunedin School of Art, holding a Master of Fine Arts.

    And another Dunedin School of Art graduate, Stephanie Cossens, took out runner up in the WETA Workshop Emerging Designer Award for her entry, Kākāpō Queen. Her costume, featuring an oversized kākāpō-head mask, was created to highlight the plight of these critically endangered birds.

     A record 17 countries were represented in this year’s 30th anniversary WOW Show held at Wellington’s TSB Arena. 

  • Call for papers: Tertiary Education Research in NZ (Oct 09 2018)

    The 2018 Tertiary Education Research in New Zealand (TERNZ) Conference will be held at Victoria University of Wellington from 28 – 30 November. There are opportunities for presentations of paper sessions, posters and research or teaching showcases – all accepted abstracts will be included in an online proceedings. TERNZ is open to anyone who is interested in research related to learning and teaching. We particularly welcome people from the wider tertiary education sector who are interested in applications to their educational field.

    A distinctive feature of this conference is its emphasis on spaces for discussion and reflection. Instead of traditional paper presentations, themes will be developed through a series of more extended conversations led by the presenter, in which all participants will have the opportunity to play an equal part to promote discussion and sharing of ideas.     

    The conference reception on the 28th November will include a showcase of original and engaging approaches in either research or teaching as well as posters and we encourage you to consider making submissions for this as well as for the parallel sessions. Pre-conference workshops will be offered on the afternoon of the 28th November. More information about these will be available via the TERNZ 2018 website in the near future.

    The closing date for abstracts is 15th October, 2018.  Registration closes on 21st November, 2018.

    TERNZ is sponsored by Ako Aotearoa and Victoria University of Wellington and supported by HERDSANZ. Click here for the conference website.

    Image credit: Phillip Capper, used under Creative Commons licence CC-BY 2.0

  • Inspirational outdoors-people celebrated (Oct 09 2018)
    Andy Thompson has been acknowledged for his contribution to outdoor education, receiving a rare Life Membership Award from the New Zealand Outdoor Instructors’ Association (NZOIA).

    In addition, one of our Outdoor Leadership and Management students, Sam McComb, received an Excellence Award, aimed at students who have a passion for outdoor instruction and show great potential for further involvement in the industry beyond their studies

    The awards were presented at the annual NZOIA Excellence Awards dinner at Mangakino over the weekend.

    Andy has spent more than 30 years in outdoor instruction and education, including 17 years as Programme Coordinator for our own Diploma in Outdoor Leadership in Management. He served on NZOIA’s Board, including two years as Chair, and has worked as an Antarctic Field Trainer, Army Adventure Training instructor, Mt Cook Search and Rescue team member, and World Challenge Expedition Leader.

    He is the first person to be presented with a prestigious NZOIA Life Membership Award in five years.

    “Andy has made a tremendous contribution to the sector and earned the respect of his peers for his humour, hard work and determination to make the industry better,” says NZOIA Chair Gillian Wratt. “Over the years he has mentored and inspired hundreds of instructors, many of whom have gone on to play leadership roles in their own right.”

    Our warm congratulations to both Andy and Sam!

     

     

  • Working to make Dunedin predator free (Oct 09 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic is delighted to be one of 20 organisations joining forces with the goal of ridding Dunedin of possums, rats and stoats by 2050.

     

    Predator Free Dunedin will work to ensure the city can safeguard its status as the wildlife capital of New Zealand, by targeting Introduced pests that prey on our vulnerable native wildlife.

     

    The collective has a budget of $15 million over the next five years, including $4.33 million from Predator Free 2050 Limited and $1.5 million from the Otago Regional Council.

     

    In Dunedin last week, the Conservation Minister, Eugenie Sage, celebrated the group's launch. 

     

    “The Dunedin and wider Otago community has already shown its conservation leadership, with successful projects like Orokonui Ecosanctuary and Orokonui Halo,” she said. “I look forward to seeing the return to the city of healthier populations of native plants and wildlife and a continued increase in public involvement in creating safe spaces for our distinctive indigenous species.”

     

    Targets for the first five years include the eradication of possums from the 9,000 hectare Otago Peninsula, and to suppress rats, possums, weasels, ferrets and stoats across 12,500 hectares of land surrounding Orokonui Ecosanctuary, between Aramoana, Waitati and North East Valley.

     

    The group will build upon the great work undertaken by the Predator Free Peninsula and Halo Predator Free Project to connect these areas with a new Urban Linkage project, and Dunedinites will be encouraged to work collaboratively to implement predator control operations in their backyards and in local reserves within the Urban Linkage area.

     

    The other 19 organisations that have joined Otago Polytechnic to form the Predator Free Dunedin Charitable Trust are: Kāti Huirapa Runanga ki Puketeraki Incorporated, Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, Dunedin City Council, Otago Regional Council, OSPRI New Zealand Limited, Department of Conservation, University of Otago, Landcare Research New Zealand Limited, Landscape Connections Trust, Otago Peninsula Biodiversity Trust, The Otago Chamber of Commerce Incorporated, Otago Natural History Trust, The Dunedin Wildlife Trust, Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust, Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand Incorporated, Otago Peninsula Trust, The Pukekura Trust, Save the Otago Peninsula Society Incorporated and Quarantine Island/Kamau Taurua Community Incorporated.

     

    Visit Predator Free Dunedin's website

    Visit Predator Free Dunedin's Facebook

    Visit Predator Free Dunedin's Twitter

    Learn more about our Wildlife Hospital

     

     

  • Otago Polytechnic graduate is Young Horticulturalist of the Year finalist (Oct 03 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic graduate Morgan Hampton (22), owner of Bluestone Gardeners and Nursery, is in the final of the Young Horticulturist of the Year, along with a finalist from Queenstown and four other competitors under 30 years old from around the country.

    Morgan, who undertook a three-year apprenticeship at the Dunedin Botanic Garden, is now self-employed and also works a day a week at Glenfalloch gardens, on the Otago Peninsula.

    Read the full ODT story.

  • Otago Polytechnic Product Design learners involved in Dinosaur Park revamp (Oct 03 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Product Design learners are combining work and play in a community project that aims to develop new equipment for Dunedin’s “dinosaur park”.

    Seven second-year product design students at Otago Polytechnic have spent the past month developing concepts for new play equipment to be installed at Marlow Park in St Kilda, otherwise known as the “Dinosaur Park” because of its iconic slide.

    The idea to steadily revamp the park is the brainchild of eight Rotary clubs from the wider Dunedin area.

    Rotary Club of Dunedin South member Michael van Aart hopes the first piece of equipment will be installed at the park in the summer of 2019-20.

    The students’ brief includes designing equipment that is practical to build, safe to use and accessible.

    Michael says Rotary would like to install a new piece of equipment each year for three or four years. The equipment should spark a user’s imagination and complement the existing play equipment.

    The public will be consulted on the selected designs, he says.

    Otago Polytechnic senior design lecturer Andrew Wallace says the students’ concepts will be designed to “excite and entice” youngsters.

  • Public Seminar: Unbound - Notes on an Exhibition (Oct 02 2018)

    THURSDAY 18 OCTOBER 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Unbound; Notes on an Exhibition

    Victoria Bell & Dr. Natalie Smith  (Curators)

    Unbound explores the fluidity of dress, bodies and sexualities through artist responses to Christine Webster’s BlackCarnival Series 1992 – 1994. The project coincides with Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium (21-24 Sept, 2018) co-hosted by The Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ) and The School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art at OP and is timed to celebrate the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New Zealand.

    Dr. Natalie Smith is a teaching fellow in the Department of Sociology, Gender and Social Work and an independent scholar.  Here research interests lie in the art – fashion nexus.  

    Victoria Bell is Undergraduate Programmes Coordinator and Studio Coordinator Textiles at The Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic. Her research touches upon postcolonialism, feminism, and the ethics of animal representation.

     

  • Otago Polytechnic Design trio relishing Te Papa opportunity (Oct 02 2018)

    A trio of Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design (Communication) learners have been busily brainstorming ways to further enhance visitor engagement at Te Papa.

    Melanie Wilson, Catherine Chin and Avishkar Ahire received $20,000 in seed funding and a place on the Mahuki accelerator programme at Te Papa, where they have been based for the past six weeks.

    The learners’ project initially began with an Otago Museum collaboration as part of their Communication Design course on Interaction Design.

    They used user-focused methods to better understand a design problem posed by Otago Museum, and pitched possible solutions to Otago Museum, including developing “low-fi” prototypes.

    Going by the collective name, Merge Creative Agency, the trio focused on young people, aged 18-30, who don't normally visit museums.

    They identified that young people prefer stories to information, and want to share social experiences together.

    They then developed a prototype Augmented Reality game, designed to access objects in the museum through gameplay and collaboration.

    They pitched their concept to the team at Mahuki, and received a place on the accelerator programme for 2018 to further explore areas such as storytelling, gaming, animation, virtual reality, augmented reality, mobile design, and 3D modelling.

    Mahuki is in its third year and is world-leading in its work in the intersection of tech start-ups and the GLAM sector (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums).

    Mahuki’s in-residence programme takes place in Te Papa’s purpose-built innovation space in central Wellington.

    During the four-month programme, 10 teams develop solutions to a range of challenges facing cultural institutions, culminating in a showcase event where they get to show their work to investors, customers and key stakeholders.

    Each team gets: financial support of $20,000, free co-working office space in Te Papa, access to Te Papa's experts, collections and visitors, and, among other benefits, opportunities to engage with national and international culture and heritage institutions.

    In return, Te Papa takes a small shareholding in each company in recognition of the value of the programme.

    “We have been lucky enough to work with experts in their field, whether that’s in the GLAM sector community or further across the board,” Melanie says.

    “We have met some great entrepreneurs who have been teaching us the different ways to create a sustainable business model.

     “We are really hoping to complete a prototype, which we can pitch at our end of the programme showcase. We are also hoping this will lead to some potential funding to help us keep developing our ideas and, fingers crossed, be passed on to developers.”

    Melanie says the team has learnt much from the Mahuki experience.

    “Coming from just being students at Otago Polytech to now being co-founders of a start-up business trying to make a viable product has definitely been a bit of a learning curve.

    “We have just been matched with mentors from a mixer evening. They will be a great help in the future development of our company as they are as keen as we are to see our idea succeed.”

  • Tuffery sculpture set to grace Otago Polytechnic entrance (Oct 01 2018)

    A sculpture by celebrated New Zealand artist Michel Tuffery MNZM will be installed at the entrance to Otago Polytechnic on 15 October, 2018.

    The 2.5m-high, sandcast bronze sculpture – titled Nga Kete – will be located in front of the courtyard outside the Mason Centre on Forth St, Dunedin.

    Nga Kete was selected by a panel of art professionals earlier this year after an extensive process involving several short-listed artists’ proposals.

    It was an honour to submit my concept and it is humbling that Nga Kete has been created for Otago Polytech Te Kura Matatini ki Otago and the wider Dunedin community.”

    Tuffery likens Nga Kete to an archaeological midden, “a natural layering of metaphors weaving the kaupapa of the traditional, environmental and cultural with community and history”.

    Nga Kete is laden with narrative and Tuffery hopes the sculpture will serve as a reminder to those who enter Otago Polytechnic that the institution will feed the “mind and spirit of each, ensuring all shall leave having filled their kete with the knowledge required to carry oneself forward”.

    During late 2017, Tuffery undertook site visits to Otago Polytechnic, widening his research by meeting with respective Kai Tahu leaders and Rūnanga at Ōtākou Marae along with local historians.

    He also welcomed the opportunity to work with Dunedin based firm Farra Engineering Ltd, and its industry network. Farra is managing the onsite installation of Nga Kete.

    Design elements will see Nga Kete function as a sundial at the entrance to the Otago Polytechnic’s Hub. At night, ambient up-lighting will enhance the sculpture’s woven textures, based on the historical buried cable used to pull the 1886 Armstrong Disappearing Gun at Taiaroa Head, and Pātiki (flounder) and Tukutuku patterns directly linked to Ōtākou Marae.

    Named a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2008, the Wellington-based artist has fond memories of his time at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Art in the late 1980s and is delighted to be able to contribute to the institution and the community.

    “There is a saying in Māori, ‘aroha mo te aroha’. It is about reciprocation.”

    Otago Polytechnic is a member of the Tertiary Precinct Planning Group along with the Dunedin City Council, University of Otago, Otago Regional Council and Otago Museum.  It is also a member of the Leith Amenity Project Working Group, which has discussed ways to enhance the Tertiary Precinct with a sculpture walkway from the Dunedin School of Art, through the Tertiary Precinct, to the Octagon.

  • Success Story: Wai Kuen (Ryan) Chong (Sep 25 2018)

    Entrepreneur Ryan Chong is learning how to do business in New Zealand in his Bachelor of Applied Management programme at OPAIC.

    The 25-year-old from Hong Kong already has his own company called Bula Group Limited. That company includes a car exporting company in USA called Bula Auto and a technology product brand in Hong Kong called Bula Tech, which is selling nationwide in New Zealand.

    Ryan decided to study at OPAIC because he’d heard all about the school’s hands-on focus from his education advisor. 

    “What you learn here and what you experience here can apply to what you do in the real world,” he says.

    Since beginning his course here he’s received lots of good advice about how to manage a business in a better way, particularly during his entrepreneurship classes.

    He’s learned how to create a proper business plan, and about management methods, and is using that knowledge to become an official supplier to PB Technology.

    Ryan says one of the best things about OPAIC is the lecturers and the way they teach.

    “I have a lot of interaction with all the teachers.”

    Ryan has also studied in the USA and says universities have larger class sizes there so students don’t get to interact with teachers as much.

    According to Ryan the most important thing about OPAIC is its practical element.

    “They teach you how to do the stuff. You can really apply this in the workplace..” he says.

    “Otago Polytechnic will get you ready to work.”

    Ryan’s goals are to be a successful entrepreneur and to have a successful sustainable business that people are aware of. He also wants to spend time learning about different things before settling on one field.

    Now that he’s worked in the automotive and technology industries, he wants to give the financial area a go.

    “I want to try the financial area, I want to see more things.”

    Ryan says New Zealand is a relaxed place with lots of opportunities to explore and develop.

    He believes Hong Kong and America are already well-developed with a lot of competitors, but here in New Zealand you can still find an area to develop.

    There is a lot of opportunity to work or start up a business here, he says.

     

  • Wildlife Hospital caring for rare kakī (Sep 20 2018)

    The Wildlife Hospital Dunedin has admitted a rare kakī. 

    The young adult bird has severe foot injuries, which require treatment with antibiotics and painkillers as well as surgery to repair the damage.

    “He is very sassy and doing really well in hospital, which is terrific,” says Dr Lisa Argilla, one of New Zealand’s best-known wildlife veterinary surgeons, who is heading the hospital alongside accomplished wildlife veterinary nurse Angelina Martelli.

    “He is quite good at telling us off if we enter his territory or do anything he doesn’t approve of,” Lisa says.

    “In consultation with local runānga, the kakī recovery team has come up with a very appropriate name for this precious little guy – Tōnui, which means big toe.”

    There are only 132 kakī in the wild. By the early 1980s the population had declined to just 23.

    Kakī are found in the Mackenzie Basin, where the Department of Conservation runs the Kakī Recovery Programme in collaboration with the Isaac Conservation and Wildlife Trust in Christchurch.

    “Our injured patient was released in the Tasman Valley in August 2017 and is one of 130 young birds released that year. The Tasman Valley is intensively trapped by DOC, which has led to an increased survival rate for kakī and other braided river nesting birds,” Lisa explains.

    *The Wildlife Hospital will be officially opened by the Mayor of Dunedin, Dave Cull, at the Dunedin School of Art, Riego St, on Friday 28 September (from 5.30pm-7.30pm).

    Read more about the Wildlife Hospital

     

  • Screening to support Wildlife Hospital (Sep 20 2018)

    Keen to support Dunedin’s Wildlife Hospital?

    The Wildlife Hospital Students’ Association (WHSA) has teamed up with Natural History New Zealand and the Regent Theatre to host the New Zealand premiere screening of NHNZ's new series, Orangutan Jungle School, on Tuesday 25 September at 7pm.

    The event is a fundraiser for both the Wildlife Hospital and the Borneo Orangutan Survival Fund.

    “We are very passionate about the work that the Wildlife Hospital does, and see it as vitally important to ensure the ongoing sustainability of New Zealand's diverse native wildlife,” says Fiona Thorp, of the WHSA.

    “From a student's perspective, there is a lot of excitement and enthusiasm around the Wildlife Hospital and its work, and a sense of serious commitment to wildlife conservation. 

    Since opening in January and operating out of Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing, the Wildlife Hospital has treated hundreds of injured birds, including rare takahe, various kiwi and numerous penguins.

    “The Wildlife Hospital has been hugely successful this year,” Fiona says.

    “As a study body, we are passionate about helping to sustain the hospital’s vital work.”

    For more information, email: whsa.otago@gmail.com

     

    Read more about the Wildlife Hospital

    Read more about Orangutan Jungle School

     

  • Success Story: Evgenia Balashova (Sep 18 2018)

    Evgenia Balashova says one of the best things about OPAIC is the freedom students have to drive their own projects.

    Evgenia, who comes from St Petersburg in Russia, has just completed a Graduate Diploma in Applied Management at OPAIC.

    She has a degree in advertising from Russia and has worked in the advertising and events industries. She’s also owned her own business running a small hostel.

    Evgenia said her decision to move to New Zealand was quite spontaneous. She’d never thought much about coming to the country but likes it now that she’s here, especially the people.

    “Everyone is so friendly and responsive. People really care about each other. That’s what I really like about New Zealand.”

    She decided studying OPAIC’s Graduate Diploma in Applied Management would be an interesting way to re-qualify and improve on her existing degree.

    “I found it really exciting. I love it, I love learning,” she says.

    “It’s something new and really interesting and challenging, and I enjoy it so much.”

    One of the best things about OPAIC is that students are free to implement their own projects, she says.

    They have deadlines to meet and theory to learn, but overall the course is quite flexible.

    Evgenia says all of the lecturers here present information clearly, which is important for students who speak English as a second language.

    She says the information she gained from her course is really relevant and can be used in the real world. She’s worked as an assistant salesperson at a digital marketing company here in New Zealand and has seen the things she been learning about in practice.

    Evgenia hopes to find full-time work in the marketing and advertising field and says she wouldn’t mind working for an airline one day as she enjoys travel.

    She believes OPAIC has prepared her well for the workforce and recommends it to others considering overseas study.

    “Don’t be afraid, just go. If you really want to do this, don’t be scared.”

  • "UNBOUND": Women, Cloth and Clothing CTANZ Symposium #Suffrage125 (Sep 17 2018)

    This year, Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium, organised in partnership with the Costume, Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ), the School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic – Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, will be held in September, 21-23, 2018.

    CTANZ is a national organisation that provides a forum for the study, research and conservation of dress and textiles. Established in 2002, this will be the 18th national presentation of the symposium.

    The exhibition, Unbound opens Friday 21st September to launch Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium in the DSA Gallery, The Dunedin School of Art (evening is open to the public). The symposium will be held in The HUB and G Block on Saturday 22 & Sunday 23 September, 2018.

    Unbound: Liberating Women, A Symposium

    The 2018 symposium recognises New Zealand’s 125 years of women’s suffrage by exploring the relationships between women, cloth, and clothing.

    Recognising 125 years of women’s suffrage in New Zealand, the 2018 Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand symposium Unbound: Liberating Women offers an opportunity to explore the past, present or future roles of dress and textiles in women’s suffrage and other liberating moments

    How do cloth, clothes, fashion and art reveal, reflect or challenge social limits for women? In the spirit of the early suffragists, how might they empower futures and/or relate to feminist projects? How are they used to give or constrain political voice? When is cloth revolutionary?

    Unbound: Liberating Women celebrates the power of cloth and clothes in the visual, material world and explores how women make and use these to transform and transcend boundaries. Speakers: Our keynote speakers are Jane Malthus and Nina Tonga.

    > See here for programme of Unbound – presenters and papers 
    > CTANZ symposium 2018 – provisional schedule
    subject to some rearrangement in sessions.

     

    ALL WELCOME - REGISTRATIONS STILL AVAILABLE AT. https://ctanz-unbound-2018.lilregie.com/booking/attendees/new

    Unbound: the exhibition

    21 September – 18 October, 2018.
    Open:10am - 4pm, week days.
    Dunedin School of Art Gallery,
    Otago Polytechnic – Te Kura Matatini ki Otago,
    Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Special opening: Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 September, 9am-4pm.

    OPENING NIGHT: 5:30pm to 8pm, Friday 21 September 2018.
    The Dunedin School of Art Gallery, P Block, Otago Polytechnic, (Entrance off Riego Street).
    Citizen Styled event by Professor Margo Barton (21 Sept.), 5:30pm onwards.
    Artists; Professor Margo Barton, Anita DeSoto, Edwards + Johann, Steve Lovett, Michelle Mayn, Dylan McCutcheon-Peat with Simon Swale, Victoria McIntosh, Marie Strauss with Justin Spiers and Susan Videler.
    Co-curated by Dr Natalie Smith and Victoria Bell.

    Unbound: the exhibition is timed to coincide with Unbound: Liberating Women, A Symposium organised in partnership with the Costume and Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ), The School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art, at Otago Polytechnic –
    Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, 21-22 September 2018. See: http://costumeandtextile.co.nz/symposium/

    Pop-Up Market
    Saturday 22nd September 10am-4pm.
    Student works for sale; clothing, textiles, jewellery, accessories, prints, design wares.

     

     

     

     

     

  • OPAIC celebrates Māori Language Week (Sep 12 2018)

    OPAIC is celebrating Māori Language Week this week in a number of ways.

    We would love for staff to lead the way and participate by speaking te reo. Some ideas for lecturers are to welcome your class in Māori or write the date on the board in Māori.

    All staff can encourage students to come to Level 8 on Thursday to weave a flax flower. Look for the Māori word of the day each day on the screens around campus. You could also encourage students to come to Room 101 and use the guide sheet to order a coffee from Student Success in Māori.

    In addition to these initiatives, Dr Abbas Malik is working with his students to develop a Māori mobile app. The app shows Māori numbers alongside digits, so users can learn the numbers in te reo.

  • Performances | Public Seminars | Workshops: Fu Institute (Sep 06 2018)

    27 SEP, P152, LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART

    Who Does the Artist Think She Is? by Frank Fu,

    Come and moan at FU INSTITUTE, through an afternoon free moaning session towards issues we the artists facing today, from resistance, representations, to relationships, and everything else in between. Let’s get rejected/ejected!

    Born in Inner Mongolia, China. Frank Fu is a performance artist. His work challenges the white box settings of galleries and museums, his endurance performances and interventions examine his identity as an artist, often commenting on the politics of the art world. His work has shown at Venice Biennale, Documenta, Sydney Biennale, Asian Contemporary Art Fair (NYC), Asian Contemporary Art Week (NYC), Rubin Museum of Art (NYC), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Locarno Film Festival, Vision Du Réel (Switzerland) and Transcinema (Peru) . Frank Fu has also been featured on networks and publications such as NHK (Japan), CCTV4 (China), ARTCO (Taiwan), The National Business Review, New Zealand Herald, Listener Magazine, Frieze Magazine, TateShots, etc. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles with his cosmic twin Yves Gore. Frank Fu is the founder and head of school at FU INSTITUTE.

  • Wildlife Hospital volunteers on fundraising drive (Sep 06 2018)

    Keen to support Dunedin’s Wildlife Hospital?

    On Saturday 15 September, the Wildlife Hospital Students’ Association (WHSA) will be out and about in Dunedin, raising funds for the busy facility.

    Since opening in January and operating out of Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing, the Wildlife Hospital has treated hundreds of injured birds, including rare takahe, various kiwi and numerous penguins.

    “The Wildlife Hospital has been hugely successful this year,” says Fiona Thorp, of the WHSA.

    “As a study body, we are passionate about helping to sustain the hospital’s vital work.”

    Fiona says more than 80 volunteers will be spread across 17 locations in Dunedin on 15 September, providing stickers and fliers about the Wildlife Hospital and, of course, information about how people can donate.

    “We have some penguin and kiwi costumes which will be around the Otago Farmers Market and George St areas. We will also be offering face-painting at the market from 9am-12pm,” Fiona says.

    For more information, email: whsa.otago@gmail.com

    Read more about the Wildlife Hospital

  • Success Story: Nayoma De Silva (Sep 06 2018)

    Graduate Nayoma De Silva has put everything she learned at OPAIC to good use and started her own business bringing cinnamon-based products from Sri Lanka to New Zealand.

    Nayoma says she moved here from Sri Lanka to get some international experience and exposure. She had been dreaming of starting her own business when she arrived.

    During her internship she worked with a company exporting New Zealand lumber. She tried to arrange to export lumber to her country but couldn’t find a supplier.

     “Later on I thought, why can’t I do the reverse?”

    During her strategic marketing class she started thinking about how her country was full of resources that the whole world was asking for. She should try importing goods from Sri Lanka as she had many contacts there.

    Nayoma had noticed New Zealanders eat and drink a lot of takeaway products.

    “I was thinking I should make good, healthy food products.”

    She says she decided on Ceylon cinnamon as the first product to start up the business Sri Lankan Heritage since it's considered the world’s best cinnamon and is indigenous to Sri Lanka.  Other products she'll look to sell in the future include Ceylon tea, coconut, melon, turmeric and Aloe vera.

    Her first shipment of a Ceylon cinnamon health drink in sachet bags has recently arrived in the country and she’s working on marketing the product.

    Within the next six months she’ll expand her product portfolio from one to about 20. The next products - a cinnamon shoe spray, cinnamon sticks, and cinnamon powder - will reach the country by next month.

    Nayoma’s already employed two staff at her company and plans to expand. She’s spoken to OPAIC about getting some interns, who might eventually join the company permanently.

    “I am really confident with their educational background. That’s why I came here asking for interns.”

    Nayoma says she used everything she’d learned at OPAIC to start the business.

    “I have put all the lessons I learned to make this, everything, management, marketing, finance, HR.”

    She said the qualification was the best course she could have chosen in terms of setting up her business – “all the practical aspects, all I have learned from this, all the support and kind-hearted people”.

    Nayoma previously worked in the aviation field for 11 years and has degrees in business administration and economics.

    She found the teaching at OPAIC was different from what she had experience before.

    Rather than focusing on theory, teachers looked at concepts and how they could be applied.

    “It was fully practical…where to apply and how to apply.”

  • Food fundraiser for International Charity Day (Sep 06 2018)

    OPAIC’s staff and students raised more than $570 for worthy organisations at their International Charity Day event yesterday.

    The Event Planning class organised the fundraiser, where staff and students were invited to bring their finest baking and cooking to campus and sell it.

    All of the money made from their sales will be donated to a number of charities. Those charities include Save the Children, Fertility NZ, NZ Red Cross, Ronald McDonald House, Forest &Bird, Kerala, Kiwi Trust for Palestinian Children Relief, and Tamariki Outreach.

    Dishes from a wide range of countries including France, India, Bangladesh, China and Palestine featured at the event.

    Staff and students raised an additional $1,501.50 for victims of the Kerala floods during collections on campus over the past two weeks.

  • VACANCY: Head of School (Sep 05 2018)

    We are seeking a future focused, inspirational leader/educator to develop and support our high performing and self-leading teams within the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic and to drive the future strategic development of the programmes we deliver alongside Architectural Studies, Design, and Food Design. 

     

    You will lead teams in a range of areas including: Ceramics, Drawing, Electronic Arts, Jewellery & Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Textiles, and Art History & Theory with around 250 enthusiastic learners to achieve excellence in alignment with our educational philosophy and priorities, values and strategic direction.  You will also ensure academic design, development and delivery exceed stakeholders’ expectations by working with your highly capable staff and with communities to achieve success.

     

    The position is full-time and permanent.

     

    For full job description and application details please see link >

  • Public Exhibition: Cyndy McKenzie (Sep 03 2018)
    3- 6 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, (RIEGO ST, off Albany St), DUNEDIN
    Cyndy McKenzie
    construing space

    DSA GALLERY
    Ground Floor, P Block
    Riego Street (off Albany St)
    Dunedin

    EXHIBITION DATES
    3 - 6 September, 2018

    EXHIBITION CLOSING
    Friday September 7th
    5pm – 7pm

    GALLERY HOURS
    Monday to Friday
    10am – 4pm
  • Students taking photos for good causes (Sep 03 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Digital Photography learners are embarking on a series of public pop-ups and studio shoots over the next fortnight in an effort to hone their entrepreneurial skills.

    Split into three groups, the Diploma in Digital Photography (Level 6) students are required to identify and develop a business model, a marketing promotion campaign and run three photography events. Any money made from their photography will be donated to charities of their choice.

    One group will set up two pop-up photo booths at the Hub on Thursday 6 September (11.30am-2pm) and on 13 September (11.30am-2pm), as well as offer portraits of individuals and groups from Otago Polytechnic’s Cumberland St studio on 20 September (4pm-6pm). The proceeds will be donated to Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust.

    Another group plans to capture pets and their owners in all their glory with a pop-up at John Wilson Drive, St Kilda, on Saturday 15 September (1pm-4pm), followed by more formal studio photos on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays over the next three weeks. The proceeds will go to SPCA.

    The third group is offering family portraits from the Cumberland St studio on Wednesday 5 September (5pm-8pm), Saturday 8 September (10am-4pm) and Saturday 15 September (10am-4pm) and will donate proceeds to Paws 4 Life.

    Digital Photography lecturer Alysha Bailey says the projects present learners with real-world challenges.

    “It’s all about working with clients. The students need to develop ideas, including how they market and promote their mini-businesses, to how they distribute the finished results to clients.

    “They are being marked on their planning and promotion. Collaboration among group members will also be taken into account.”

    For more information, visit:

    https://m.facebook.com/LifeMattersPopUp/

    https://www.instagram.com/lifematterspopup/

    https://www.facebook.com/PetPeoplePortraitsnz/

    https://www.instagram.com/petpeopleportraits/

    https://www.facebook.com/thepawsprojectop

    https://www.instagram.com/thepawsprojectop/

     

  • Public Exhibition: Macarena Bernal - Jewellery (Sep 03 2018)

    10-13 SEPTEMBER,  DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY,  RIEGO ST, (off Albany St)

    Exhibition by Macarena Bernal
    Rom: read only memory

    DATES: 10-13 September

    GALLERY HOURS
    Monday to Friday
    10am – 4pm


    EXHIBITION CLOSING: Friday Sep 14: 5-7pm

  • Public Seminar: Writing’s role in research (Sep 03 2018)

    THURS 6 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Writing’s role in research
    Matt Galloway and Hana Cadzow, Otago Polytechnic

    Writing is not merely an outcome but an integral part of Matt Galloway’s research-based art practice. Design is often referred to as a communication framework through which ideas and messages about world reach us. Matt uses the tools and methodologies of design as a way to investigate social issues such as identity, understanding of place, and the political implications of both. In practice this approach involves taking on the role of editor, writer, publisher, printer to produce publications and art objects.

    The role of writing in Hana Cadzow’s research begins with the journals she kept during field trips in Sierra Leone to capture data from her observations and interviews. Her research there and in New Zealand unpacks the experiences of women as they participate in the workforce, in the same positions as men, exploring how and why the women’s experiences differ from men’s experiences. Hana writes in different genres including her Master’s thesis and in order to inform the generation of new policies and practices to improve the participation and experiences of women at work.

    Matt Galloway is a Senior Lecturer teaching Design in the School of Art Design and Architecture. Through his interweaving of art and design practices, he has become an internationally recognised researcher exhibiting in both group and solo exhibitions.

    Hana Cadzow is a Senior Lecturer teaching engineering in the School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences. As well as writing and speaking about her research Hana has been invited to develop a series of training workshops and presentations focused on humanitarian engineering with the NZ branch of international NGO Engineers Without Borders.

  • Otago Polytechnic students to run vision screening (Aug 31 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Occupational Therapy students are rolling out a vision screening pilot programme at Kaikorai Valley College next week.

    The collaboration between Otago Polytechnic, Retina NZ and the Vision Impairment Charitable Trust Aotearoa (VICTA) utilises an “Eyes Right Toolkit”, a simple tool that can be used by health professionals and laypeople to screen for low vision, and provide a referral pathway to optometrists.

    Occupational Therapy students will screen year-9 students at Kaikorai Valley College on Tuesday 4 September.

    “In the pilot for this work, we found that this screening was sensitive enough to pick up visual deficits in secondary school students – so we are expecting to find some schoolchildren who need to visit their optometrist,” Mary Butler, Principal Lecturer, Otago Polytechnic School of Occupational Therapy, says.

    “We have arranged for a half-price consultation with a local optometrist for anyone referred through this project.”

    The school students will be taught about computer vision syndrome, how they can protect their eyes in the face of constant exposure to screens and the importance of wearing sunglasses to protect their eyes from UV radiation.

    The students will also be taught how to screen each other using the Eyes Right Toolkit. Lastly, they can download an Eyes Right Toolkit app, developed by Otago Polytechnic Information Technology students, which can be used to screen family and friends.

    In addition, Otago Polytechnic postgraduate Occupational Therapy student Helen Knight is heading to Fiji next week, where she will implement the Eyes Right Toolkit.

    Helen is part of a multidisciplinary team that visits Fiji every year to help with developing services for stroke patients. One of her tasks during the week will be to teach 300 nurses how to use the ERT to screen for visual impairments.

    “We believe this will raise awareness of the need for services in Fiji and, more locally, in Dunedin,” Mary Butler explains.

    Read more about our Occupational Therapy programme

  • Success Story: Suzanne Wong (Aug 31 2018)

    OPAIC graduate Suzanne Wong is working her way up in the hotel industry in New Zealand.

    Suzanne, known by her friends as Zani, studied a Graduate Diploma in Hotel Management at OPAIC from 2015 until 2016.

    Zani comes from the Philippines. She’s also spent time in the United States studying hospitality and tourism with a minor in music.

    After finishing her undergraduate study she returned to the Philippines and spent four years working in a call centre as a training supervisor.

    “Because I loved hospitality and the training field so much, I wanted to work in the hotels as a trainer.” 

    She started looking around for a school that could help her achieve that goal, then heard about OPAIC at an educational expo in Manila. An OPAIC representative encouraged her to come to the school and she was here a few months later.

     “My experience here at the school was awesome,” says Zani.

    “I love the teachers, I love experiential learning. We got to do a lot of stuff hands-on.”

    Zani says she liked that the school wasn’t too big, so teachers could provide students with the educational attention they needed.

    Her favourite class was Contemporary Issues in the Hotel Industry. In that class she learned about issues like globalisation, gender, environmental issues, and social responsibility.

    The hotel industry is a diverse and dynamic field and she needs to know about those things because she wants to be a manager one day.

    Zani managed to find work at Ibis Budget Auckland Central 15 days after she arrived in New Zealand, with the help of a classmate who already worked there.

    She began as a part-time room attendant, seeing it as a foot in the door of the hospitality industry. She also completed her internship at the hotel in the human resources department and on the front desk.

    Zani still works at that hotel but has worked her way into a supervisory role.

    Zani’s enjoying life in New Zealand. She says the country is beautiful and green and she loves the mountains and the ocean.

    “I’m that person who loves to hike and who loves to surf and loves to go and climb mountains.”

  • Otago Polytechnic students produce Pink-inspired donut (Aug 30 2018)

    A pair of Otago Polytechnic students have designed a donut inspired by pop superstar Pink’s concert in Dunedin this weekend.

    Described as an extravagant “freak” donut, reflecting Pink’s creative and extrovert personality, it will be sold from Otago Polytechnic’s Food Truck before and after the concert at Forsyth Barr Stadium on Saturday.

    Third-year Bachelor of Culinary Arts learners Sachien Budhia and Georgia Rhodes have developed food enterprise brand “Chocolate and Ginger”, providing bespoke food experiences that align with Dunedin events. These include Matariki celebrations and All Blacks rugby tests.

    “We enjoy Pink’s music but our venture is more about taking the inspiration and opportunity from her coming to Dunedin to create a Pink-inspired donut as opposed to doing it because we’re fans of hers,” Sachien says.

    “We want to wow our customers with the experience we provide.”

    Says Georgia: “We’ll be offering three varieties of sweet donuts: a Pink-inspired passionfruit lemon meringue; salted caramel custard; and Bounty Bar (chocolate and coconut).

    “As well as the sweet donuts we’ll be offering some ‘donut burgers’ for people who don’t have a sweet tooth.”

    “Chocolate and Ginger” will be selling their donuts from Otago Polytechnic’s Food Truck from 5pm on Saturday. They will be parked on Anzac Ave outside L Block, about 200m west of Forsyth Barr Stadium.

    For more information, visit @foodbychocolateandginger on Facebook and Instagram 

    Read more about our Culinary programmes

  • OPAIC community celebrated at alumni event (Aug 30 2018)

    Togetherness and community were the values at the centre of OPAIC’s alumni event at Orakei Bay on Friday night.

    Alumni Event 2018 was an opportunity for staff and former students to network and reminisce.

    It was the first time OPAIC had arranged such a big gathering. People travelled from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington for the event. Alumni present had studied through the Dunedin Campus, the Auckland Campus, and Capable NZ.

    The evening began with a blessing of our Iwi Ngati Whatua. The event included speeches by Middlemore Hospital director hospital services Phillip Balmer and graduate Bhagirath Padhiar, who climbed the ranks to become the customer service and sales manager at Genesis Energy.

    A number of high-achieving alumni were also honoured during the Outstanding Alumni Awards portion of the evening.

    Wilson Kuriakose received an award for his work as manager –training and development at Look Sharp. Wilson successfully planned, organised and implemented a future manager training course within the company. Thanks to his training course, 18 OPAIC graduates are employed at Look Sharp, with more than half of those graduates in management positions.

    Warrick Davidson works closely with OPAIC interns at Health 2000 ensuring quality work experience and guidance as an alumni mentor.

    Sagar Shah has progressed from an IT assistant to become an IT technician at Travel Corner Limited. He works closely with OPAIC interns at the company.

    Rosie Yijia Lyu is chief editor at New K Media Group. She single-handedly manages the publication and distribution of the City Walker Magazine.

    Rahul Kamath started out as an interning night auditor with Ibis Budget Hotels. He progressed through the organization and now works as an assistant manager. He has provided five OPAIC students with permanent employment.

    Mohit Mavi is duty manager at Spencer on Byron. He worked his way up from night auditor and has helped 27 students kick-start their hotel careers in New Zealand.

    Melody Yin progressed within the organisation 3A Signs Ltd beginning as an intern. She is now store manager and responsible for the business operations and development for the Otahuhu Branch.

    Read more about the award recipients here

    Corporate Relations manager Sidra Siddiqui said Alumni Event 2018 was a tremendous evening filled with laughter and nostalgia. Many stories and memories were shared and it was amazing to see the way so many of our graduates value the OPAIC community, she said.

    OPAIC wants to thank all our alumni who made an effort to attend the event. Especially the ones who travelled from outside of Auckland.

    Take a look at the photos from the night here.

  • Secondary school students show off design talents (Aug 28 2018)

    A brochure about learning to swim has earned Columba College year-13 student Courtney Parks the top prize in Otago Polytechnic’s Celebrate Design Secondary Schools Awards Exhibition.

    Courtney’s entry beat almost 60 others, earning her the overall award, announced at a ceremony at Otago Polytechnic’s Hub on Friday 24 August.

    As overall winner, Courtney receives a fees scholarship (Year 2, Semester 1) for Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Design degree programme, as well as art/design materials sponsored by National Art Supplies. Courtney was also named overall winner of the Communication Design section.

    Judge Caroline McCaw, academic leader for Otago Polytechnic’s Communication Design programmes, praised Courtney’s entry:

    “The judging panel agree that Courtney’s design combined elements of mid-century photography with a modernist layout.

    “The image and text elements demonstrated a mature restraint, including a limited colour palette, and well balanced elements.”

    Full list of award winners:

    Communication Design

    Overall excellence (scholarship): Courtney Parks (Columba College).

    Highly commended: Amy Waldburger (Columba College); Ghazal Dousti (Columba College); Erin Dailey (Columba College); Riley Smith (Kings High School); Mason Corbett (Kings High School); Connor Wright (Taieri College); Jacob Woodcock (Taieri College).

    Architectural Studies

    Overall excellence: Iona Hibbert (Otago Girls High School).

    Highly commended: Emilie Bell (Timaru Girls High School; Ariana Knudson-Hollebon (Otago Girls High School).

    Product Design

    Overall excellence: Ryan Horrell (St Peters College, Gore).

    Highly commended: Adam Wilson (Otago Boys High School).

    Fashion Design

    Overall excellence: George Park (Bayfield High School).

    Highly commended: Alice Parson (Bayfield High School); Sally Lory (Waitaki Girls High School).

    Otago Polytechnic’s Celebrate Design Secondary Schools Exhibition runs until Thursday 30 August at the Hub, Forth St, Dunedin.

    Read more about our Design programmes

     

     

     

  • Public Seminar: Sydney Biennale 2018: Eight Artists (Aug 27 2018)

    THURS 30 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Sydney Biennale 2018: Eight Artists in a Post-disciplinary Era

    Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar investigates the work of artists who address a range of four registers at the Sydney Biennale 2018. Reversed views expose human hubris and regret; diverse groups create sound and its scaffolding; displaced persons in flight or confrontation engage fear and empathy; bodies enact both violence and love. The works under discussion mix visual arts disciplines to an extent that begs the question whether these are relevant any longer and if so, in what ways?

    Prof. Leoni Schmidt is currently the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. In this role she supports staff research and postgraduate supervision across the institution.

  • Transforming spaces at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery (Aug 24 2018)

    Rebecca Fox from the Otago Daily Times talks to four Dunedin artists ahead of their upcoming exhibition at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery — Aroha Novak Charlotte Parallel Megan Brady and Kim Pieters — are transforming spaces at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in very different ways in an exhibition celebrating contemporary art in the city.

    Megan Brady's installation at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery centres around the creation of wall-to-wall carpet and is titled ''A Quiet Corner Where We Can Talk''. Aroha Novak is creating a pool on the second floor of DPAG, a pool with a rain shower above it, as a response to William Hodges painting of Dusky Bay. She hopes the pool will create a ''utopia inside an institution'' with the idea it will bring spirit into a confined space or rigid structure - ''a Maori world-view within a Pakeha structure''. Charlotte Parallel has been investigating Dunedin's landscape; in particular, what it sits on - a volcano and the idea of ''listening through rock''.

    For images of work and more of interview read on.....

    See also article on Aroha Nokak's work as installed ...

  • Austria engineering experience 'amazing' (Aug 21 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Engineering student Hanri de Bruin has just returned from a “truly amazing” international experience in Austria.

    Hanri, who is in her second year of a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Electrical, specialising in Mechatronics), attended the International Summer Academy in Engineering for Women at the University of Applied Science Upper Austria in July.

    “The Summer Academy has truly been an amazing and awesome opportunity for me. I can’t thank Otago Polytechnic enough for helping me get there,” Hanri says.

    “I’ll most definitely be talking to my class-mates about my trip. I would really like to see more female engineering students take up this unique opportunity in the following years. I’m sure they would love it just as much as I have.”

    The Summer Academy’s intensive, two and a-half week programme combined sophisticated theory with hands-on practical experience. In addition to the general programme, each participant chose a three-day specialised module in Natural Sciences, Engineering and Technology or Computer Science and Informatics.

    “I’m very interested in prosthetics – in particularly, bionic prosthetics. So, I was very excited when we had a lecturer come and teach us about both non-bionic and bionic prosthetics,” Hanri says.

    “The whole session was amazing, but what made it better was the passion the lecturer had for helping his students learn as much as they could about this topic so that they could create businesses providing this type of technology at affordable prices.”

    Inspired by the lecturer’s insights, Hanri returned to Dunedin in late July and immediately set in motion plans for a research and development company that, “hopefully, will be able to provide high-end bionic prosthetics to anyone who needs them”.

    Hanri says the Summer Academy also exposed her to a wide range of cultures as well as a variety of engineering insights.

    “It showed me how differently we might approach a task – which just shows me how important and beneficial it is to have that type of diversity in any engineering workplace.”

    Hanri says there were also plenty of non-engineering experiences in Austria.

    “Every weekend we had the chance to go somewhere new. We went to Salzburg, the home of the Sound of Music, and a few of us went to Prague, where there was a folk dancing festival happening.”

    Hanri’s Summer Academy experience is another example of how Otago Polytechnic aims to prepare its graduates for the global workplace.

    “Otago Polytechnic believes such experiences provide insights into the global contexts of the students’ studies,” Marc Doesburg, Director, Global Engagement, says.

    “We cultivate opportunities for our students overseas to give them insights into other cultures, to experience cultural diversity and develop cultural competence.

    “We educate out students for the global workplace, so we secure funding for them to undertake learning overseas.”

    Read more about our Engineering programmes

  • Get a light to give a light (Aug 20 2018)

    Give a light to a family in need. 

    This September Otago Polytechnic engineering students will spend ten days in Vanuatu, where they will provide residents with water-cleaning systems and solar lights.

    Vanuatu is exposed to natural disasters such as cyclones, earthquakes, volcanic activity and drought. In 2015 the devastating Cyclone Pam wiped out 95% of buildings, crops and plantations. Many homes in Vanuatu don’t have electricity, and once the sun has gone down there is no light inside homes to help children do their schoolwork.

    To help raise the funds for our engineering project, we are offering Otago Polytechnic staff and students the opportunity to purchase solar-powered lights that will be donated to households in Vanuatu. When you donate a light you will also receive a light – perfect for camping, father’s day or your household survival kit.

    The collapsible lights can be charged during the day and then last for seven hours. They are strong enough to light a standard size room.

    For a $20 donation you will provide a light to a family in need, help an engineering student improve water quality for the people of Vanuatu, and receive your very own light.

    Simply pay at Customer Services.

     

    How we will help

    Along with the provision of solar lights, our engineering students will work on a range of projects including:  

    • Solar disinfection of water
    • Gravity water systems
    • Solar water pumping
    • Desalination
    • Solar, wind and wave water-pumping systems
    • Sanitation systems

    Our students will transfer their skills and knowledge to local community members. This will help ensure that the developments bring long-term, sustainable benefits to Vanuatu.

    For our students, this is a unique opportunity to experience project-based learning, and a way to demonstrate that our people make a better world. 

     

  • Otago Polytechnic symposium shines light on eye health (Aug 20 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Occupational Therapy students are hosting two eye health events on Friday 24 August to help prepare for the Save Sight Symposium in early September.

    Occupational Therapy students will be hold a practice class about vision screening, using a new Eyes Right Toolkit app, In G Block from 12-1pm. They will then head to Kaikorai Valley College where they will teach year-9 and year-10 students about protecting their eyes in relation to computer vision syndrome.

    From 1pm-2pm, Occupational Therapy students will train Otago Polytechnic student ambassadors how to be sighted guides for the Save Sight Symposium, which offers professionals and laypeople alike an opportunity to learn more about eye health.

    The one-day symposium, to be held at Otago Polytechnic on Saturday 8 September, is the result of a collaboration between Otago Polytechnic, Retina NZ and Visual Impairment Charitable Trust New Zealand. 

    Key speakers include ophthalmologist Harry Bradshaw, who will discuss the three main causes of preventable vision loss, and Emma Sandford, a physician qualified in the medical treatment of eye disorders, who will discuss eye health and nutrition.

    The messages in Emma’s keynote address will be reflected in a lunch, after which participants can attend a 90-minute workshop presented by Matt Rudland, of the Blind Foundation, who will tackle the challenges of making technology accessible for people with low vision.

    Topics for other, shorter talks in the afternoon include computer vision syndrome, lighting for low vision, vision screening for teenagers, ebikes and mobility scooters, moving well with low vision, how brain injury can affect vision, and introducing people with vision loss to online shopping.

    To round off the day, a lively collection of Dunedin’s most articulate and opinionated citizens will debate the topic “Not waving but drowning: keeping our heads above the digital flood.”

    “We have been running awareness events for several years, but the symposium is really breaking the teaching silos,” says Mary Butler, Principal Lecturer, Otago Polytechnic School of Occupational Therapy.

    “The event has brought together students from across Otago Polytechnic to develop different elements as part of their learning projects.

    “This includes Occupational Health students who will be developing recipes and producing a book with key messages about eye health, others who will teach school students to vision-screen one another using the Eyes Right Toolkit,” Mary says.

    “Otago Polytechnic Information Technology students will also be talking about the intergenerational volunteering program that they have been engaged in over the past six months, teaching older people to use their digital devices.

    “Another IT student will showcase the prototype for a virtual reality vision simulation app; and we will also showcase an app that has been developed to help re-train vision for individuals how have had a stroke or brain injury.

    “A postgraduate event management student is guiding and researching the event. Also, students from Otago Polytechnic’s School of Design (Communication) are using the event to learn how to brand and raise awareness for the 2019 Save Sight September campaign.

    “Lastly, Otago Polytechnic has sponsored a group of student ambassadors to be sighted guides on the day of the symposium this year – to ensure that everything runs smoothly for the audience.”

    The Save Sight Symposium will be held at Otago Polytechnic’s Hub, Forth St, on Saturday 8 September. To register, phone 0800 569-849 (extn 1) or email admin@retina.org.nz

  • Otago Polytechnic joins Climate Leaders Coalition (Aug 20 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic continues to demonstrate its commitment to making a better world, becoming the first tertiary institution in New Zealand to join the Climate Leaders Coalition.

    From Z to Air New Zealand, the coalition comprises 60 businesses that have pledged to reduce emissions and play a leadership role in New Zealand’s transition to a low emissions economy in an effort to meet our national commitments under the Paris Agreement.

    At Otago Polytechnic, we measure our greenhouse gas emissions and publicly report on them. We set a public emissions reduction target consistent with keeping within 2° of warming and have committed to being carbon neutral by 2030.

    To “lead the way in sustainable practice” is a strategic goal at the highest level at Otago Polytechnic.

    That goal includes several specific targets for 2021 that relate to carbon emissions, including 80% waste reduction, 30% energy reduction in existing buildings, and planting 3000 trees.

    “We are in the process of a significant campus redevelopment. We are moving from older less efficient buildings to modern buildings with sustainability and carbon management at the core of their design,” says Philip Cullen, Chief Operating Officer, Otago Polytechnic.

    This focus also reduces “whole-of-life” building operating costs and contributes significantly to the following key sustainability criteria:

    •  Low embodied carbon footprint
    • “Living Building Challenge” (LBC) material (Red List) compliance
    • LBC material local economy sourcing compliance
    • LBC material net positive waste compliance
    • Biophilic environments

    Our impact on carbon emissions from our operations is only a small part of our contribution to staying within the 2° target. Otago Polytechnic has committed to 100% of our undergraduate programmes directly addressing issues of sustainable practice. This means all our graduates will be capable of having an impact on sustainability throughout their careers.

    Through innovation and strategic investment, we have achieved a significant reduction on carbon since we started reporting in 2011, from 2880 tCo2e in 2011 to 2069 tCo2e in 2017, even with a significant growth in business.

    The exception is a small increase in the last year. Our analysis indicates that was largely due to more robust reporting processes for air travel. As evidenced in the annual report from the Tertiary Education Facilities Management Association, we have the lowest emissions on a per-student basis of all of the 12 tertiary education institutions in the process.

    In the next 12 months Otago Polytechnic is undertaking an analysis of what international benchmark systems we should align with. These will evaluate the options in the broader context of sustainable practice as well as driving our ambition to be carbon neutral by 2030.

  • Public Seminar Programme 2018 - TERM 3 (Sep 02 2018)

    Term 3 - Public Seminar Programme 2018

     

    THURSDAY 26 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Public Art, Art/Science and Climate Change

    Bridie Lonie, Dunedin School of Art

    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements.

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of Ara Toi ¯Otepoti – Our Creative Future, the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy.

    THURS 2 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Space and work

    Yusam Sung, Asia NZ Artist in Residence

    The influence of space in my work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. It is very important to be able to work in a place I have not experienced before, since creating an unexperienced space is the beginning of a new body of work.

    Yusam Sung was born in 1978 in Korea. He graduated from Hong-ik University in South Korea and received an MFA from Long Island University, New York. He has been exhibiting his work consistently in New York and Seoul. The influence of space in his work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. The exhibition space and works are influenced by each other, and the entirely new space created is an environment that the viewer has not been seen visually before.

    THURS 9 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Multimodality in a therapeutic arts practice

    Amanda Woodford, Arts Therapist and mixed media artist

    This seminar will present the weaving of artistic modalities within an arts practice that has a therapeutic intention. The presentation will be grounded in a piece of arts-based research, ‘An artistic holding of mended bodies in pain’, which explores the experience of three participants living with post-operative chronic (or on-going) pain.

    Amanda Woodford is a registered creative arts therapist and academic lecturer/supervisor (The MIECAT Institute, Melbourne), who has recently returned to Dunedin after 17 years overseas. She holds a Graduate Diploma and Master of Arts degree in Experiential and Creative Arts Therapy, and is completing a Professional Doctorate in Therapeutic Arts Practice. Amanda is also the current vice-president of ANZATA.

    THURS 16 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Playing with Performance - The brief History of The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men began performing in 2011, staging weekly, 1 hour performances in the main hallway at the Dunedin School of Art with the intention of exploring performance. From there they developed a strong working practice that has seen them build a vast body of work with over 50 performances performed in a variety of galleries, libraries and public spaces. Their performances dealt with aspects of play, the ridiculous, public space, the mundane and endurance. They predominantly focused on tasks repeated continuously for long periods of time slowly resulting in the pointlessness or ridiculousness of the task with the gradual breaking down of themselves, physically, mentally and emotionally. The Yellow Men performed in the Blue Oyster Project space in 2013 which was part of the Dunedin Fringe Festival and saw them take away Best Visual Art award and Best in Fringe award for their show Re:Perform. They have shown work in the Dunedin Public art Gallery Rear Window in 2016 and in 2017 they participated in BBeyonds Global performance, with a Group show in the Octagon.

    The Yellow Men: Jed McCammon and Clarke Hegan studied at the Dunedin School of Art from 2010-2013 completing with BVA Honours in Sculpture.

    THURS 23 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Capturing Light– Roy Miller New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
    Brian Miller

    Roy Miller from Miller Studios Dunedin was for 30 years, from the 1950s, the foremost stained glass artist in New Zealand producing over 300 church windows in NZ. Over many years Brian Miller researched the lives of the artists who did the designs resulting in a richly illustrated book Capturing Light.

    Brian Miller completed a Science Degree at Otago in 1969, spent 13 years teaching in Papua New Guinea and then ran Tapui Children’s Bookshop for over 20 years.  For the last 10 years he and his wife Diane have written and published over a dozen books on a wide range of topics.


    THURS 30 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Sydney Biennale 2018: Eight Artists in a Post-disciplinary Era

    Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar investigates the work of artists who address a range of four registers at the Sydney Biennale 2018. Reversed views expose human hubris and regret; diverse groups create sound and its scaffolding; displaced persons in flight or confrontation engage fear and empathy; bodies enact both violence and love. The works under discussion mix visual arts disciplines to an extent that begs the question whether these are relevant any longer and if so, in what ways?

    Prof. Leoni Schmidt is currently the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. In this role she supports staff research and postgraduate supervision across the institution.

     

    THURS 6 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Writing’s role in research
    Matt Galloway and Hana Cadzow, Otago Polytechnic

    Writing is not merely an outcome but an integral part of Matt Galloway’s research-based art practice. Design is often referred to as a communication framework through which ideas and messages about world reach us. Matt uses the tools and methodologies of design as a way to investigate social issues such as identity, understanding of place, and the political implications of both. In practice this approach involves taking on the role of editor, writer, publisher, printer to produce publications and art objects.

    The role of writing in Hana Cadzow’s research begins with the journals she kept during field trips in Sierra Leone to capture data from her observations and interviews. Her research there and in New Zealand unpacks the experiences of women as they participate in the workforce, in the same positions as men, exploring how and why the women’s experiences differ from men’s experiences. Hana writes in different genres including her Master’s thesis and in order to inform the generation of new policies and practices to improve the participation and experiences of women at work.

    Matt Galloway is a Senior Lecturer teaching Design in the School of Art Design and Architecture. Through his interweaving of art and design practices, he has become an internationally recognised researcher exhibiting in both group and solo exhibitions.

    Hana Cadzow is a Senior Lecturer teaching engineering in the School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences. As well as writing and speaking about her research Hana has been invited to develop a series of training workshops and presentations focused on humanitarian engineering with the NZ branch of international NGO Engineers Without Borders.

     

    THURS 13 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Artist with Issues

    Yves Gore, Artist in Residence

    There’s always something wrong with life and there’s no “perfect” time to make art, but the artist must find his or her own way to maim their own personal struggles and transform them into art. Yves Gore examines how artists can develop habits in their unique personal lives, experiment courageously while studying the biographies of artists they look up to, so they can develop their own mastery and identity in art.

    Yves Gore is a multimedia artist from Borneo Island, who grew up in Auckland and is living in Los Angeles. Her medium ranges from illustration, performance art and writing narratives for literary fiction, films to video games with funding from Auckland University, NZ Lottery Grants and Auckland City Council. Yves Gore’s works have been exhibited in MadeinLA in Los Angeles, ArtStation in Auckland, TRANSCINEMA in Lima, Peru, Hypergonar in Avignon France and VISIONS DU REEL festival in Nyon, Switzerland. She has taught subjects on Staying Creative, Managing Depression, and How to Survive a Comic Convention in Los Angeles. Yves Gore currently working on her biopunk novel, and she is also the co-founder of FU INSTITUTE.

    THURS 27 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Who does the artist think she is?
    Frank Fu, Artist in Residence

    Come and moan at FU INSTITUTE, through an afternoon free moaning session towards issues we the artists face today, from resistance, representations, to relationships, and everything else in between. Let’s get rejected/ejected!

    Born in Inner Mongolia, China. Frank Fu is a performance artist. His work challenges the white box settings of galleries and museums, his endurance performances and interventions examine his identity as an artist, often commenting on the politics of the art world. His work has shown at Venice Biennale, Documenta, Sydney Biennale, Asian Contemporary Art Fair (NYC), Asian Contemporary Art Week (NYC), Rubin Museum of Art (NYC), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Locarno Film Festival, Vision Du Réel (Switzerland) and Transcinema (Peru). Frank Fu has also been featured on networks and publications such as NHK (Japan), CCTV4 (China), ARTCO (Taiwan), The National Business Review, New Zealand Herald, Listener Magazine, Frieze Magazine, TateShots, etc. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles with his cosmic twin Yves Gore. Frank Fu is the founder and head of school at FU INSTITUTE.

  • Public Seminar: Roy Miller New Zealand Stained Glass Artist (Aug 17 2018)

    THURS 23 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Capturing Light– Roy Miller New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
    Brian Miller

    Roy Miller from Miller Studios Dunedin was for 30 years, from the 1950s, the foremost stained glass artist in New Zealand producing over 300 church windows in NZ. Over many years Brian Miller researched the lives of the artists who did the designs resulting in a richly illustrated book Capturing Light.

    Brian Miller completed a Science Degree at Otago in 1969, spent 13 years teaching in Papua New Guinea and then ran Tapui Children’s Bookshop for over 20 years.  For the last 10 years he and his wife Diane have written and published over a dozen books on a wide range of topics.

  • Otago Polytechnic students win medals at national culinary competition (Aug 14 2018)

    A team from Otago Polytechnic’s Central Campus has won silver medals in both the Kitchen and Front of House sections of the prestigious annual Nestlé Toque d’Or student culinary competition.

    Culinary students Cassandra Hislop and Kayla Green proved to be strong competitors in the kitchen, while Kirandeep Kaur impressed patrons in a simulated restaurant with her service skill-set at the Logan Campbell Centre in Auckland.

    Pitted against 21 competitors from around New Zealand, the trio were required to create a three-course menu at the competition.

    The dishes comprised an entrée of Akaroa salmon lightly pickled in coconut oil, citrus and coconut liquor. The main was a New Zealand beef sirloin and beef cheek dish, followed by a smooth chocolate semi-frozen ganache. The use of fresh New Zealand vegetables was maximised across the menu to enhance colour, texture and flavour.

    The pressure was on throughout the three hours live kitchen cook-off, as the team battled the clock and the scrutiny of top industry judges, including culinary giant Anton Mosimann, of the UK. Any errors made by competitors during the event resulted in lost points.

    Competing teams were marked against WorldChefs International Judging Standards, which included food preparation, presentation, taste and service.

    Event organiser and NZChefs National Ambassador Graham Hawkes said Nestlé Toque d’Or is the ultimate challenge for hospitality students.

    “They have to pull it all together, work seamlessly as a team and deliver a polished performance on the day while under pressure.

    “Aside from the competitive element, the event also opens doors for the students by placing them in front of hospitality professionals from around New Zealand who are scouting for talent.”

    This year was the 28th anniversary of Nestlé Toque d’Or, which is New Zealand’s longest running and most prestigious student cookery and restaurant service event. Held in 17 other countries around the world, it has launched the careers of many world-famous chefs.

    Sponsors of this year’s event were: Nestlé Professional, Beef + Lamb New Zealand, vegetables.co.nz, Akaroa Salmon, House of Knives and Moffat.

    Read more about our Hospitality programmes at our Central and Dunedin campuses

  • It's Plastic-Free August! (Aug 13 2018)

    Missed Plastic-Free July? Never fear – Otago Polytechnic has organised a Plastic-Free August.

    Organised by Seeds (Students Enriching, Educating and Developing Sustainability), Plastic-Free August aims to raise awareness of the environmental problems caused by single-use disposable plastic and challenges you to do something about it.

    A range of workshops (free or low-cost) are being held this month. These include:

    >Making bees wax wraps on Tuesday 14 August and Tuesday 21 August (enrol at Customer Services in the Hub, cost $5)

    >A screening of feature-length documentary A Plastic Ocean at OUSA's Otago Room on Friday 17 August (4.30pm)

    >Shop without the packaging on Wednesday 29 August. Join members of Seeds on a bike ride to a café and enjoy a free drink. Reserve a Polybike or bring your own.

    In addition, there is a waste-in-a-shoebox challenge running throughout the month. Interested? Check out the installation in the Hub, near the entrance to G Block.

    For more information, contact Sarah.Sellar@op.ac.nz

  • Otago Polytechnic designers among national award finalists (Aug 13 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic features strongly at the Designers Institute of New Zealand Best Design Awards 2018, to be held in Auckland on September 22.

    Nine Otago Polytechnic School of Design projects have been named finalists in the Best Design Awards, an annual showcase of excellence in graphic, spatial, product, interactive and motion design.

    “We are very excited to student projects selected as finalists across six categories,” says Caroline Terpstra, Acting Head of College – Art, Design and Architecture.

    “These projects represent the diversity and talent of 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students from the Bachelor of Design (Communication and Product Design specialties) as well as second-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies students and the Bachelor of Design Honours programme.

    “Through these projects, students have successfully researched and communicated complex ideas to an audience and addressed real-world issues using creative problem solving, technical skills and effective collaboration.

    “The Best Design Awards give students the opportunity to present their work to an audience of design professionals who are always keen to support and nurture new design talent.”

    Entries this year include group and individual projects and collaborations with a range of Dunedin institutions, among them a recent Otago Museum exhibition, “Things Change: Martin Phillipps and The Chills”. The result of a collaboration between museum staff and Otago Polytechnic Communication Design students, it is a finalist in the Spatial-Exhibition section.

    And the innovation of Otago Polytechnic’s Food Design Institute has been recognised, too.

    Lecturers Tony Heptinstall and Timothy Lynch and their students worked with Sanitarium to produce the “So Good Garden of Goodness”, comprising edible 3000 products at Auckland’s Britomart in February. Although not specifically attributed to Otago Polytechnic, the Garden of Goodness collaboration with creative agency Geometry is a finalist in five Best Design Awards categories.

    “Previous Best Awards finalists and winners have built on their success to launch their design careers in New Zealand and overseas,” Caroline says, referring to Otago Polytechnic’s past successes.

    Last year, Otago Polytechnic third-year Product Design projects claimed two Best Design Awards: a silver in the student product category (Glo wheelchair) and bronze in the student product category (Cactus Hammock). A first-year Communication Design student claimed Bronze in the student graphics section (Roller Derby zine series).

    Otago Polytechnic School of Design finalists for Best Design Awards 2018:

    Product, Student

    Ian McDowall, Francis Bingham – Yellow Eyed Penguin monitoring system (lecturers, Machiko Niimi, Tim Armstrong)

    Tania Turei – Pae seating (lecturers, Machiko Nimi, Andrew Wallace, Tim Armstrong)

    Nga Aho, Student

    Tania Turei – Pae seating (lecturers, Machiko Nimi, Andrew Wallace, Tim Armstrong)

    Spatial, Student

    Fraser Dixon – Chaos and Order (lecturer, Ross T Smith)

    Joshua Weir – Bare (lecturer, Ross T Smith)

    Graphics, Student

    Erin Broughton – Bones (lecturer, Matt Galloway)

    2017 Cohort – Dust (lecturers, Leigh Paterson, Matthew Galloway) 

    Moving Image, Student

    Michael Smith, Becki Jones, Jaimee Caffell – Into the Woods (lecturer, Jon Wilson)

    Spatial, Exhibition

    Otago Museum – Things Change: Martin Phillipps and the Chills (Contribution from Otago Polytechnic Design lecturer Martin Kean and year-3 Communication Design students Mitchell Allen, Josh Caldwell, Sean Funnell, Jessie Hamilton, MJ Heap and Scott Kingsbury).

     

     

  • Public Seminar: The brief History of The Yellow Men (Aug 10 2018)

    THURS 16 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Playing with Performance - The brief History of The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men began performing in 2011, staging weekly, 1 hour performances in the main hallway at the Dunedin School of Art with the intention of exploring performance. From there they developed a strong working practice that has seen them build a vast body of work with over 50 performances performed in a variety of galleries, libraries and public spaces. Their performances dealt with aspects of play, the ridiculous, public space, the mundane and endurance. They predominantly focused on tasks repeated continuously for long periods of time slowly resulting in the pointlessness or ridiculousness of the task with the gradual breaking down of themselves, physically, mentally and emotionally. The Yellow Men performed in the Blue Oyster Project space in 2013 which was part of the Dunedin Fringe Festival and saw them take away Best Visual Art award and Best in Fringe award for their show Re:Perform. They have shown work in the Dunedin Public art Gallery Rear Window in 2016 and in 2017 they participated in BBeyonds Global performance, with a Group show in the Octagon.

    The Yellow Men: Jed McCammon and Clarke Hegan studied at the Dunedin School of Art from 2010-2013 completing with BVA Honours in Sculpture.

  • POP UP SHOW: Year One and Two Art Students - ONE NIGHT ONLY (Aug 10 2018)

    THURS 16 AUG, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    Studio Methodologies Two & Four

    POP UP SHOW - ONE NIGHT ONLY
    Please join us to celebrate the culmination of our Year One & Two student projects in the DSA Gallery and throughout the studios.

    OPENING
    Thursday 16 August | 5pm – 7pm

  • Alesha on a mission (Aug 10 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic fashion student Alesha Pyers is on a head-turning mission — to raise awareness of mental health issues through her funky jewellery designs.

    A year ago, Alesha was fighting for her life in Dunedin Hospital following an ongoing battle with mental illness.

    After her recovery at home in Nelson, she decided to follow a long-held love of fashion and enrolled in Otago Polytechnic’s School of Design this year.

    Now, she’s managing a fast-growing accessory business, Alesha Kerry Collections. Launched in June, the business focuses on earrings shaped like the electrical pulse of a heartbeat.

    Alesha, who makes the earrings using a laser-cutter in the Experiment Production Innovation Construction centre (EPICentre) at Otago Polytechnic, wants her designs to spark conversations about mental health.

    She has also teamed up with Nelson jewellers Benjamin Black Goldsmiths to create a gold and diamond version of the earrings, which will be auctioned online between August 18 and September 2.

    All proceeds will go to Voices of Hope, and the Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust.

    Read more about Alesha

    Visit her website

  • Design projects to be showcased (Aug 08 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design students will showcase a range of innovative projects next week.

    Appropriately titled “Fuse”, the exhibition at the Hub highlights interdisciplinary project work by first and second-year learners studying Product Design, Communication Design and Fashion Design.

    Revealing how ideas, skills and experiences are shared among designers, students will also put into practice their craft-based entrepreneurial skills in a Pop-Up Market that involves innovative electronics and lighting as well as interactive projections.

    Fuse details:

    The Pop-Up Market will be held on Tuesday 14 August (10-4pm).

    The exhibition opens Wednesday 15 August (at 5pm) and continues until 27 August at the Hub.

  • Hospitality students prepare for cook-off (Aug 07 2018)

    A team of top hospitality students from Otago Polytechnic Central Campus will be looking to slice, dice and cook their way to success at this year’s Nestlé Toque d’Or national culinary competition.

    The annual event pits teams of top hospitality students and trainees against each other in a live kitchen cook-off.

    Students Cassandra Hislop, Kayla Green and Kirandeep Kaur will face off against seven other teams from around the country when they hit the competition floor in Auckland on Monday 13 August.

    The event organiser, NZChefs national president Graham Hawkes, says the students have been undergoing a rigorous training programme in the run-up to the big event.

    “It’s definitely not for the faint-hearted, as the team has to perfect and complete a four-course menu, while a panel of top industry judges critique and score their every move.”

    Included in this year’s roster of judges is culinary giant Anton Mosimann of the UK.

    “Recognised internationally for his culinary expertise, Mosimann has held many high-powered positions and received numerous accolades during his career,” Graham says.

    “Mosimann’s Limited holds a Royal Warrant as caterers to HRH The Prince of Wales and in 2004, he received an OBE for services to the Tourist and Food Industries.”

    Mosimann’s involvement in the event will also be particularly significant, given that he was the first ever winner of the competition when it was launched overseas.

    Graham says the teams will be working hard on competition day to impress Mosimann and the other judges and take out the top award. Last year, a team from Otago Polytechnic Central Campus won three silver medals at the event.

    Each team is made up of three competitors – two culinary and one restaurant service. Menus and service must be completed in a set time-frame within a simulated kitchen and dining environment.

    Aside from the competitive aspect, the competition also offers students a gateway to career opportunities and job offers, with influential culinary professionals scouting the event for fresh talent.

    Graham says people can watch the teams in action at the Logan Campbell Centre in Auckland from 10.40am on Monday 13 August or via live streaming on the Nestlé Toque d’Or Facebook page.

    Sponsors of this year’s event are: Nestlé Professional, Beef + Lamb New Zealand, vegetables.co.nz, Akaroa Salmon, House of Knives and Moffat.

  • Public Seminar: Multimodality in a therapeutic arts practice (Aug 06 2018)

    THURS 9 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Multimodality in a therapeutic arts practice

    Amanda Woodford, Arts Therapist and mixed media artist

    This seminar will present the weaving of artistic modalities within an arts practice that has a therapeutic intention. The presentation will be grounded in a piece of arts-based research, ‘An artistic holding of mended bodies in pain’, which explores the experience of three participants living with post-operative chronic (or on-going) pain.

    Amanda Woodford is a registered creative arts therapist and academic lecturer/supervisor (The MIECAT Institute, Melbourne), who has recently returned to Dunedin after 17 years overseas. She holds a Graduate Diploma and Master of Arts degree in Experiential and Creative Arts Therapy, and is completing a Professional Doctorate in Therapeutic Arts Practice. Amanda is also the current vice-president of ANZATA.

  • Public Seminars (Aug 06 2018)

    TERM 3 - PUBLIC SEMINAR PROGRAMME 2018

     

    THURSDAY 26 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Public Art, Art/Science and Climate Change

    Bridie Lonie, Dunedin School of Art

    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements.

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of Ara Toi ¯Otepoti – Our Creative Future, the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy.

    THURS 2 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Space and work

    Yusam Sung, Asia NZ Artist in Residence

    The influence of space in my work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. It is very important to be able to work in a place I have not experienced before, since creating an unexperienced space is the beginning of a new body of work.

    Yusam Sung was born in 1978 in Korea. He graduated from Hong-ik University in South Korea and received an MFA from Long Island University, New York. He has been exhibiting his work consistently in New York and Seoul. The influence of space in his work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. The exhibition space and works are influenced by each other, and the entirely new space created is an environment that the viewer has not been seen visually before.

    THURS 9 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Multimodality in a therapeutic arts practice

    Amanda Woodford, Arts Therapist and mixed media artist

    This seminar will present the weaving of artistic modalities within an arts practice that has a therapeutic intention. The presentation will be grounded in a piece of arts-based research, ‘An artistic holding of mended bodies in pain’, which explores the experience of three participants living with post-operative chronic (or on-going) pain.

    Amanda Woodford is a registered creative arts therapist and academic lecturer/supervisor (The MIECAT Institute, Melbourne), who has recently returned to Dunedin after 17 years overseas. She holds a Graduate Diploma and Master of Arts degree in Experiential and Creative Arts Therapy, and is completing a Professional Doctorate in Therapeutic Arts Practice. Amanda is also the current vice-president of ANZATA.

    THURS 16 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Playing with Performance - The brief History of The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men began performing in 2011, staging weekly, 1 hour performances in the main hallway at the Dunedin School of Art with the intention of exploring performance. From there they developed a strong working practice that has seen them build a vast body of work with over 50 performances performed in a variety of galleries, libraries and public spaces. Their performances dealt with aspects of play, the ridiculous, public space, the mundane and endurance. They predominantly focused on tasks repeated continuously for long periods of time slowly resulting in the pointlessness or ridiculousness of the task with the gradual breaking down of themselves, physically, mentally and emotionally. The Yellow Men performed in the Blue Oyster Project space in 2013 which was part of the Dunedin Fringe Festival and saw them take away Best Visual Art award and Best in Fringe award for their show Re:Perform. They have shown work in the Dunedin Public art Gallery Rear Window in 2016 and in 2017 they participated in BBeyonds Global performance, with a Group show in the Octagon.

    The Yellow Men: Jed McCammon and Clarke Hegan studied at the Dunedin School of Art from 2010-2013 completing with BVA Honours in Sculpture.

    THURS 25 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Capturing Light– Roy Miller New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
    Brian Miller

    Roy Miller from Miller Studios Dunedin was for 30 years, from the 1950s, the foremost stained glass artist in New Zealand producing over 300 church windows in NZ. Over many years Brian Miller researched the lives of the artists who did the designs resulting in a richly illustrated book Capturing Light.

    Brian Miller completed a Science Degree at Otago in 1969, spent 13 years teaching in Papua New Guinea and then ran Tapui Children’s Bookshop for over 20 years.  For the last 10 years he and his wife Diane have written and published over a dozen books on a wide range of topics.


    THURS 30 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Sydney Biennale 2018: Eight Artists in a Post-disciplinary Era

    Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar investigates the work of artists who address a range of four registers at the Sydney Biennale 2018. Reversed views expose human hubris and regret; diverse groups create sound and its scaffolding; displaced persons in flight or confrontation engage fear and empathy; bodies enact both violence and love. The works under discussion mix visual arts disciplines to an extent that begs the question whether these are relevant any longer and if so, in what ways?

    Prof. Leoni Schmidt is currently the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. In this role she supports staff research and postgraduate supervision across the institution.

     

    THURS 6 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Writing’s role in research
    Matt Galloway and Hana Cadzow, Otago Polytechnic

    Writing is not merely an outcome but an integral part of Matt Galloway’s research-based art practice. Design is often referred to as a communication framework through which ideas and messages about world reach us. Matt uses the tools and methodologies of design as a way to investigate social issues such as identity, understanding of place, and the political implications of both. In practice this approach involves taking on the role of editor, writer, publisher, printer to produce publications and art objects.

    The role of writing in Hana Cadzow’s research begins with the journals she kept during field trips in Sierra Leone to capture data from her observations and interviews. Her research there and in New Zealand unpacks the experiences of women as they participate in the workforce, in the same positions as men, exploring how and why the women’s experiences differ from men’s experiences. Hana writes in different genres including her Master’s thesis and in order to inform the generation of new policies and practices to improve the participation and experiences of women at work.

    Matt Galloway is a Senior Lecturer teaching Design in the School of Art Design and Architecture. Through his interweaving of art and design practices, he has become an internationally recognised researcher exhibiting in both group and solo exhibitions.

    Hana Cadzow is a Senior Lecturer teaching engineering in the School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences. As well as writing and speaking about her research Hana has been invited to develop a series of training workshops and presentations focused on humanitarian engineering with the NZ branch of international NGO Engineers Without Borders.

     

    THURS 13 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Artist with Issues

    Yves Gore, Artist in Residence

    There’s always something wrong with life and there’s no “perfect” time to make art, but the artist must find his or her own way to maim their own personal struggles and transform them into art. Yves Gore examines how artists can develop habits in their unique personal lives, experiment courageously while studying the biographies of artists they look up to, so they can develop their own mastery and identity in art.

    Yves Gore is a multimedia artist from Borneo Island, who grew up in Auckland and is living in Los Angeles. Her medium ranges from illustration, performance art and writing narratives for literary fiction, films to video games with funding from Auckland University, NZ Lottery Grants and Auckland City Council. Yves Gore’s works have been exhibited in MadeinLA in Los Angeles, ArtStation in Auckland, TRANSCINEMA in Lima, Peru, Hypergonar in Avignon France and VISIONS DU REEL festival in Nyon, Switzerland. She has taught subjects on Staying Creative, Managing Depression, and How to Survive a Comic Convention in Los Angeles. Yves Gore currently working on her biopunk novel, and she is also the co-founder of FU INSTITUTE.

    THURS 27 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Who does the artist think she is?
    Frank Fu, Artist in Residence

    Come and moan at FU INSTITUTE, through an afternoon free moaning session towards issues we the artists face today, from resistance, representations, to relationships, and everything else in between. Let’s get rejected/ejected!

    Born in Inner Mongolia, China. Frank Fu is a performance artist. His work challenges the white box settings of galleries and museums, his endurance performances and interventions examine his identity as an artist, often commenting on the politics of the art world. His work has shown at Venice Biennale, Documenta, Sydney Biennale, Asian Contemporary Art Fair (NYC), Asian Contemporary Art Week (NYC), Rubin Museum of Art (NYC), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Locarno Film Festival, Vision Du Réel (Switzerland) and Transcinema (Peru). Frank Fu has also been featured on networks and publications such as NHK (Japan), CCTV4 (China), ARTCO (Taiwan), The National Business Review, New Zealand Herald, Listener Magazine, Frieze Magazine, TateShots, etc. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles with his cosmic twin Yves Gore. Frank Fu is the founder and head of school at FU INSTITUTE.

  • Exhibition: Otago Secondary Schools Art Awards CELEBRATE (Aug 06 2018)

    21 - 31 AUG, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY

     

    Celebrate Art 2018

    Otago Secondary Schools
    Art Awards Exhibition

    Ground Floor, P Block, Riego Street (off Albany St), Dunedin

    GALLERY HOURS *
    Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm

     

    Celebrate Art Awards:

    Certificate of Excellence

    Kavanagh College – Joy Auckram

    King’s High School – Liam Craig

    Columba College – Pamela Han

    Otago Girls’ High School – Ariana Knudson-Holebon

    Logan Park High School – Cuba Rust

    Otago Boys’ High School – Nathan Hill

    Taieri College – Kim Dalwood

    Kaikorai Valley College – Kesi Tobeck

    Queen’s High School – Ella Montgomery

    Bayfield High School – Angelia Li

    South Otago High School – Calisa McLeary

    Waitaki Girls’ High School - Sally Lory

    St Hilda’s Collegiate School – Kaylee Dickison

     

    Scholarship Award

    St Hilda’s Collegiate – Victoria Tong

     

    A reminder that the exhibition is on until the end of this week. The gallery is open Monday to Friday 10am – 4pm.

     

     

    (Image: David Schack Celebrate 2017 DSA Scholarship Award Winner)

  • Lecturer honoured for helping others (Aug 06 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic lecturer Jade Morgan has earned a highly commended citation at the Arts Access Corrections Maui Tikitiki a Taranga Awards 2018.

    Jade received the honour from Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis at Parliament Buildings last week.

    He was recognised for his use of martial arts and tikanga at Otago Corrections Facility to inspire positive change, and for offering education opportunities to released prisoners at Otago Polytechnic, where he works as a lecturer in the College of Community Development and Personal Wellbeing.

    “The award shows me that the work I do is both highly valued and appreciated by both the participants in my course and the management of the prison.

    “We have a saying, Ēhara te kūmara e kōrero ana ki tōna reka … a, waiho mā te takata hei kōrero mana — the kūmara does not boast of its own sweetness but instead the community extolls the virtues of the kumara,” Jade says.

    Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker says: “Jade is a great example of how you can significantly change your life and add value to your community.

    “Education gives people a second chance. It gave Jade that opportunity and he is now giving it back to others.” 

    Read more about Jade

     

     

  • Otago Polytechnic learners bound for Argentina (Aug 06 2018)

    Three Otago Polytechnic students have been selected in the latest round of Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Latin America.

    Sammy Crawford, Joshua Taylor and Jamie Rhodes, who are studying the Post Graduate Diploma of Applied Science (Physical Conditioning) at Otago Polytechnic, will be involved in a highly collaborative project based in La Plata, Argentina.

    The trio, who will spend six weeks working on a customised rugby strength and conditioning programme with the La Plata Rugby Club, leave at the end of August, returning in early October.

    The programme is a cross-cultural collaborative sports training initiative that aims to connect emerging strength and conditioning coaches within the environment of a South American tertiary institution — the University of La Plata — and an amateur (semi-professional) rugby club.

    Sammy Crawford, one of the trio, is relishing the international opportunity.

    “Academically, it will expose us to a high-performance, fast-paced environment, and will be a great way to get immersed in a rugby-rich culture other than New Zealand’s. I’m also looking forward to experiencing an Argentinian barbecue!

    “I am hoping to be able to train with the national rugby union team (Los Pumas) while we are over there, as I have already trained with five national teams this year — the New Zealand Sevens side as well as the Tonga, Fiji, Samoa and Georgia 15-a-side teams.”

    Marc Doesburg, Director, Global Engagement, says Otago Polytechnic fosters a wide range of overseas partnerships in order to provide opportunities for its students to prepare for the global workforce.

    “We cultivate opportunities for our students overseas to give them insights into other cultures, to experience cultural diversity and develop cultural competence.

    “We educate out students for the global workplace, so we secure funding for them to undertake learning overseas.

    “Evidence indicates that students who study abroad have better grades, experience less attrition and graduate at higher rates than students who do not study abroad. They have a competitive edge in the job market.”

    In fact, Otago Polytechnic’s strong relationships with overseas institutions were key to Sammy enrolling at the Institute of Sport and Adventure.

    “I knew there had historically been great opportunities in South Africa, Samoa and America,” Sammy says.

    “So, to have spent four weeks in Fiji and now be heading off to Argentina for six weeks is super-exciting.”

    The Otago Polytechnic learners are among more than 60 young New Zealanders who will experience life and learning in Latin America, courtesy of the Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Latin America (PMSLA).

    The destinations include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico, where they will study, conduct research or carry out internships.

    “For each of the individuals involved, winning one of these scholarships is a life-changing event,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins says.

    “It offers the chance of a big adventure that’s personally challenging and enriching.”

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s many international partnerships

  • Otago Polytechnic wins performance excellence award (Aug 06 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic has won a prestigious organisational excellence award — the Baldrige-affiliated Performance Excellence Study Award (PESA).

    Otago Polytechnic is the first organisation in New Zealand to undergo an assessment process comparable to that for the United States Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and to reach the required standard.

    Administered by Business Excellence NZ (endorsed by the American Society of Quality), the PESA involves rigorous examination by United States-based examiners against seven core Baldrige Performance Excellence Criteria to determine organisational excellence by world-class standards.

    The US Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is one of the most internationally recognised frameworks for business excellence. Globally, many countries operate national quality awards aligned with Baldrige or have similar core criteria.

    Key performance indicators and/or highlights noted by the examiners, include:

    • Otago Polytechnic’s strong organisational vision and culture of excellence
    • High levels of student satisfaction and employer satisfaction with Otago Polytechnic graduates
    • Excellent educational performance indicators (course completions, student progression, qualifications and course retention)
    • Sound financial performance and growth in overall EFTs/enrolments
    • High number of Ako Aotearoa Awards for Teaching Excellence
    • High levels of workforce engagement and staff satisfaction
    • Organisational agility and leading-edge innovation through a diverse provision of educational experiences. For example: EduBits, Otago Polytechnic’s suite of micro-credentials

    The journey towards PESA recognition was initiated by more than a decade ago by Chief Executive Phil Ker, who had a vision to develop and embed a culture committed to continuous improvement. 

    “I am thrilled that Otago Polytechnic has achieved this recognition – the result of years of effort by all of our staff," Phil says.

    "We have rigorously applied the validated best practice in organisation and management which is the essence of the Baldrige framework, and have seen our performance improve year on year across all dimensions.

    "The journey has been tough but satisfying, but there is still much more to do. This award will inspire us to reach even greater heights”

    The award-winning application was Otago Polytechnic’s fourth attempt, the institution making its first PESA submission in 2012. 

    “After each submission, we receive immensely valuable feedback, which guides our improvement action plans,” Joanne Greatbanks, Director: Performance Improvement explains.

    “Otago Polytechnic is passionate about providing our learners with a ‘wow!’ experience. In order to continue to put our learners at the centre of everything we do, we need to continuously evolve, drive and innovate.”  

    Jo Brady, Deputy Chief Executive: People, Performance and Development states:

    “It is true that our people make a better world. We now have a globally recognised award to prove it and we remain committed to continuous improvement as the journey doesn’t have an end point. Our work matters — it has impact and transforms lives, communities and economies.”

    A formal presentation of the Performance Excellence Study Award to Otago Polytechnic will take place in the coming months.

  • Public Seminar: Space and work by Yusam Sung, Asia:NZ (Jul 30 2018)

    THURS 2 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Space and work

    Yusam Sung, Asia NZ Artist in Residence

    The influence of space in my work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. It is very important to be able to work in a place I have not experienced before, since creating an unexperienced space is the beginning of a new body of work.

    Yusam Sung was born in 1978 in Korea. He graduated from Hong-ik University in South Korea and received an MFA from Long Island University, New York. He has been exhibiting his work consistently in New York and Seoul. The influence of space in his work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. The exhibition space and works are influenced by each other, and the entirely new space created is an environment that the viewer has not been seen visually before.

  • Academic Board open discussion - Thursday 2 Aug (Jul 30 2018)

    Every few months Academic Board hold an open discussion meeting lead by a member of our Professoriate.

    Come along to this week's discussion meeting to participate, discussion papers can be accessed in the links below:

    The discussion meeting will be held on Thursday 2 August at 2.30pm in G106.

    Please contact Pam Thompson to request a meeting invitation.

     

  • TERM 3 - PUBLIC SEMINAR PROGRAMME 2018 (Jul 26 2018)

    TERM 3 - PUBLIC SEMINAR PROGRAMME 2018

     

    THURSDAY 26 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152,DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Public Art, Art/Science and Climate Change

    Bridie Lonie, Dunedin School of Art

    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements.

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of Ara Toi Ōtepoti – Our Creative Future, the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy.

    THURS 2 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Space and work

    Yusam Sung, Asia NZ Artist in Residence

    The influence of space in my work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. It is very important to be able to work in a place I have not experienced before, since creating an unexperienced space is the beginning of a new body of work.

    Yusam Sung was born in 1978 in Korea. He graduated from Hong-ik University in South Korea and received an MFA from Long Island University, New York. He has been exhibiting his work consistently in New York and Seoul. The influence of space in his work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works. The exhibition space and works are influenced by each other, and the entirely new space created is an environment that the viewer has not been seen visually before.

    THURS 9 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Multimodality in a therapeutic arts practice

    Amanda Woodford, Arts Therapist and mixed media artist

    This seminar will present the weaving of artistic modalities within an arts practice that has a therapeutic intention. The presentation will be grounded in a piece of arts-based research, ‘An artistic holding of mended bodies in pain’, which explores the experience of three participants living with post-operative chronic (or on-going) pain.

    Amanda Woodford is a registered creative arts therapist and academic lecturer/supervisor (The MIECAT Institute, Melbourne), who has recently returned to Dunedin after 17 years overseas. She holds a Graduate Diploma and Master of Arts degree in Experiential and Creative Arts Therapy, and is completing a Professional Doctorate in Therapeutic Arts Practice. Amanda is also the current vice-president of ANZATA.

    THURS 16 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Playing with Performance - The brief History of The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men

    The Yellow Men began performing in 2011, staging weekly, 1 hour performances in the main hallway at the Dunedin School of Art with the intention of exploring performance. From there they developed a strong working practice that has seen them build a vast body of work with over 50 performances performed in a variety of galleries, libraries and public spaces. Their performances dealt with aspects of play, the ridiculous, public space, the mundane and endurance. They predominantly focused on tasks repeated continuously for long periods of time slowly resulting in the pointlessness or ridiculousness of the task with the gradual breaking down of themselves, physically, mentally and emotionally. The Yellow Men performed in the Blue Oyster Project space in 2013 which was part of the Dunedin Fringe Festival and saw them take away Best Visual Art award and Best in Fringe award for their show Re:Perform. They have shown work in the Dunedin Public art Gallery Rear Window in 2016 and in 2017 they participated in BBeyonds Global performance, with a Group show in the Octagon.

    The Yellow Men: Jed McCammon and Clarke Hegan studied at the Dunedin School of Art from 2010-2013 completing with BVA Honours in Sculpture.

    THURS 25 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Capturing Light– Roy Miller New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
    Brian Miller

    Roy Miller from Miller Studios Dunedin was for 30 years, from the 1950s, the foremost stained glass artist in New Zealand producing over 300 church windows in NZ. Over many years Brian Miller researched the lives of the artists who did the designs resulting in a richly illustrated book Capturing Light.

    Brian Miller completed a Science Degree at Otago in 1969, spent 13 years teaching in Papua New Guinea and then ran Tapui Children’s Bookshop for over 20 years.  For the last 10 years he and his wife Diane have written and published over a dozen books on a wide range of topics.


    THURS 30 AUG 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Sydney Biennale 2018: Eight Artists in a Post-disciplinary Era

    Leoni Schmidt, Director: Research and Postgraduate Studies, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar investigates the work of artists who address a range of four registers at the Sydney Biennale 2018. Reversed views expose human hubris and regret; diverse groups create sound and its scaffolding; displaced persons in flight or confrontation engage fear and empathy; bodies enact both violence and love. The works under discussion mix visual arts disciplines to an extent that begs the question whether these are relevant any longer and if so, in what ways?

    Prof. Leoni Schmidt is currently the Director: Research & Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. In this role she supports staff research and postgraduate supervision across the institution.

     

    THURS 6 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Writing’s role in research
    Matt Galloway and Hana Cadzow, Otago Polytechnic

    Writing is not merely an outcome but an integral part of Matt Galloway’s research-based art practice. Design is often referred to as a communication framework through which ideas and messages about world reach us. Matt uses the tools and methodologies of design as a way to investigate social issues such as identity, understanding of place, and the political implications of both. In practice this approach involves taking on the role of editor, writer, publisher, printer to produce publications and art objects.

    The role of writing in Hana Cadzow’s research begins with the journals she kept during field trips in Sierra Leone to capture data from her observations and interviews. Her research there and in New Zealand unpacks the experiences of women as they participate in the workforce, in the same positions as men, exploring how and why the women’s experiences differ from men’s experiences. Hana writes in different genres including her Master’s thesis and in order to inform the generation of new policies and practices to improve the participation and experiences of women at work.

    Matt Galloway is a Senior Lecturer teaching Design in the School of Art Design and Architecture. Through his interweaving of art and design practices, he has become an internationally recognised researcher exhibiting in both group and solo exhibitions.

    Hana Cadzow is a Senior Lecturer teaching engineering in the School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences. As well as writing and speaking about her research Hana has been invited to develop a series of training workshops and presentations focused on humanitarian engineering with the NZ branch of international NGO Engineers Without Borders.

     

    THURS 13 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Artist with Issues

    Yves Gore, Artist in Residence

    There’s always something wrong with life and there’s no “perfect” time to make art, but the artist must find his or her own way to maim their own personal struggles and transform them into art. Yves Gore examines how artists can develop habits in their unique personal lives, experiment courageously while studying the biographies of artists they look up to, so they can develop their own mastery and identity in art.

    Yves Gore is a multimedia artist from Borneo Island, who grew up in Auckland and is living in Los Angeles. Her medium ranges from illustration, performance art and writing narratives for literary fiction, films to video games with funding from Auckland University, NZ Lottery Grants and Auckland City Council. Yves Gore’s works have been exhibited in MadeinLA in Los Angeles, ArtStation in Auckland, TRANSCINEMA in Lima, Peru, Hypergonar in Avignon France and VISIONS DU REEL festival in Nyon, Switzerland. She has taught subjects on Staying Creative, Managing Depression, and How to Survive a Comic Convention in Los Angeles. Yves Gore currently working on her biopunk novel, and she is also the co-founder of FU INSTITUTE.

    THURS 27 SEP 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Who does the artist think she is?
    Frank Fu, Artist in Residence

    Come and moan at FU INSTITUTE, through an afternoon free moaning session towards issues we the artists face today, from resistance, representations, to relationships, and everything else in between. Let’s get rejected/ejected!

    Born in Inner Mongolia, China. Frank Fu is a performance artist. His work challenges the white box settings of galleries and museums, his endurance performances and interventions examine his identity as an artist, often commenting on the politics of the art world. His work has shown at Venice Biennale, Documenta, Sydney Biennale, Asian Contemporary Art Fair (NYC), Asian Contemporary Art Week (NYC), Rubin Museum of Art (NYC), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Locarno Film Festival, Vision Du Réel (Switzerland) and Transcinema (Peru). Frank Fu has also been featured on networks and publications such as NHK (Japan), CCTV4 (China), ARTCO (Taiwan), The National Business Review, New Zealand Herald, Listener Magazine, Frieze Magazine, TateShots, etc. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles with his cosmic twin Yves Gore. Frank Fu is the founder and head of school at FU INSTITUTE.

     

  • Public Art, Art/Science and Climate Change (Jul 26 2018)

    Our second semester public art seminar programme begins with a presentation by Bridie Lonie.


    THURSDAY 26 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM

    P152,DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements. 

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of "Ara Toi ¯Otepoti – Our Creative Future,the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy."

     

    Image credit -  Global View of the Arctic and Antarctic on September 21, 2005, by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio.
    The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC).

  • Internships encouraged (Jul 20 2018)

    Local businesses are being encouraged to take on tertiary students for internships over the 2018-2019 summer break.

    The Enterprise Dunedin business internship programme is designed to help fill gaps in local businesses, and to keep talented students in Dunedin. Funding is available to help businesses cover the cost of an intern’s remuneration.

    An event on 19 September will start the process of matching Otago Polytechnic and University of Otago learners with Dunedin companies wishing to take on summer interns.

    Read more

  • Hospital build has massive ripple effects (Jul 20 2018)

    The $1.4 billion new Dunedin hospital project will require trade training for hundreds of Dunedin people so they can help build the facility.

    Local Advisory Group convener Pete Hodgson wants training for as many local apprentices and other workers as possible before construction begins in about two years.

    The project will take a massive effort on the part of training organisations, but Otago Polytechnic chief executive Phil Ker says it ''absolutely'' can be done, subject to Government funding.

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

  • Arts + Climate Innovation Roadshow - Dunedin (Jul 19 2018)

    MON 30 JULY, 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM, DUNEDIN FRINGE HQ, 26 PRINCES STREET, DUNEDIN

    Arts + Climate Innovation: The Role of the Arts

    With expert climate scientists, Professors James Renwick and Tim Naish (Victoria University), and Founder of Track Zero, Sarah Meads. The panel will be joined by local special guests: artist Jenna Packer; artist, event organiser, Pam McKinlay; interdisciplinary artist-scientist, Jenny Rock and visual artist Ruth Evans.

    Learn the very latest climate science. Be inspired by creative projects that help us to understand and care about our planet. Contribute to the conversation. Explore how more can be done, working with the power of the arts to inspire climate action - the biggest cultural challenge of our time.

    We live in an increasingly hot, hungry and less equal world in which climate impacts disproportionately affect those most vulnerable. Scientists tell us we have a critical window – less than a decade - in which to act to prevent climate events that may be beyond civilisation’s capacity to adapt. The urgent need for far reaching social, economic and technological responses is not being matched by action.

    The Arts + Climate Innovation Roadshow is travelling to 10 locations from Whangarei to Dunedin from July to November 2018. Join us for a timely conversation about how the arts can contribute to how we adapt to climate impacts and shape our carbon neutral future in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    To find out more about Track Zero, visit our website: http://trackzero.nz/

    Tickets available at Eventbrite.

    In partnership with the Royal Society of New Zealand.

        

  • Graduate wins prestigious Design and Art Direction Award (London) (Jul 19 2018)

    University of Otago and Dunedin School of Art graduate Aïcha Wijland has received a prestigious Yellow Pencil Award through the D&AD Awards for her design work for Beano. She has won a prestigious Yellow Pencil award in the 2018 Design and Art Direction Awards (D&AD), in the New Blood category for emerging writers and designers. Thousands of people from around the world enter the London-based awards every year. Ms Wijland is the first New Zealander to win a top prize.

    Since 1962, D&AD has been inspiring a community of creative thinkers by celebrating and stimulating the finest in design and advertising. The D&AD Professional Awards are recognised globally as the ultimate creative accolade, entered and attended by the best from around the world.

    Read more in the Otago Daily Times...

    Photo: Larry J Photography

  • An avalanche of important new knowledge (Jul 16 2018)

    "Before this course, my avalanche knowledge was don't get caught in one, cause you can die," says Winter Olympian Jossi Wells, who is among a group of snowsport stars gaining expert insights into avalanche risk management through Otago Polytechnic.

    Wells joined fellow Winter Olympians Migeul Porteous and Finn Bilous, Freeride World Tour competitor Craig Murray, Freeride World Tour Qualifier competitor Julian Hampton and Multisport athlete Hamish Fleming in a block course of practical avalanche assessments held in Wanaka last week.

    The cohort are enrolled in the New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management (Level 5) at Otago Polytechnic, the most experienced provider of avalanche education in New Zealand.

    The 12-week course, which began in late April, provides participants with a solid understanding of theory, which is delivered online over 10 weeks and includes weekly web seminar sessions to answer questions and refine concepts. 

    During this period, participants are also required to practise their on-snow skills. They then undertake one week of practical and assessment. This is followed by one week of reflection, during which they evaluate their next steps and plan any re-assessment as required. 

    Learning outcomes include:

    • Identifying and communicating potential avalanche hazards by applying knowledge of snowpack, weather, terrain and avalanche phenomena (30 credits)

    • Mitigating risk to self by selecting and applying appropriate control methods while operating in avalanche terrain within scope of practice (5 credits)

    • Participating as part of a small party rescue by applying appropriate avalanche search and rescue skills while mitigating risks (5 credits)

    The qualification can lead to the New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management (Level 6). 

    Enrolments for the next 12-week programme, from 9 July to 30 September (Practical block course in Wanaka,16-22 September) are currently being wait-listed.

    Watch coverage of Wells and company’s avalanche training on One News

    Read more about our New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management

  • Otago Polytechnic sponsors team to Super Cup (Jul 16 2018)

    Following many weeks of intensive training, the Football Otago Youth Development Academy Trust (FOYDAT) under-17 team left Dunedin for Northern Ireland at the weekend.

    The FOYDAT squad is once again contesting the prestigious Super Cup (formerly the Milk Cup), which involves some of the world’s best youth football teams, including Newcastle United and Spartak Moscow.

    Sponsored by Otago Polytechnic, among others, the team opens its campaign on Monday 23 July.

    “Last year, we finished 11th out of 20 teams and scored a few goals. We know we face some really tough opponents, but we’ll give it our best shot,” coach Andy Duncan says.

    “The idea of the trip is to develop football in Dunedin and Otago. We have a fantastic bunch of boys and the support from parents and sponsors such as Otago Polytechnic has been wonderful.”

  • Artist wins $5000 prize (Jul 11 2018)

    Dunedin artist Marion Wassenaar has won the Estuary Art and Ecology Prize 2018.

    The only contemporary art prize in New Zealand with ecology at its core, the competition is in its 12th year. It invites artists to research and respond to the Tāmaki Estuary, in South Auckland, underscoring the ecological value of the waterway and encourage action against its pollution.

    Marion, who is a lecturer in the Print Studio and Operations Assistant at Otago Polytechnic’s Dunedin School of Art, says she is “thrilled” to have been awarded the $5000 first prize, particularly as she decided to travel to Auckland last weekend to attend the exhibition opening at Malcolm Smith Gallery.

    “This was the first time I had submitted an entry for the prize so I was delighted to be announced one of 19 finalists,” Marion says.

    “Having grown up in South Auckland, I am aware of the Tamaki Estuary and its environs.

    “With my art practice concerns about the human impact on the environment, I felt this would be an ideal opportunity to submit an artwork that addressed the polluted waterways.”

    Marion’s winning work, Unplugged (2018, carbon book in laser etched reagent bottle, inkjet prints), features a charcoal water filter made from the carbon remains of a book.

    “The idea behind the work depended on me finding an appropriate book. So after scouring op shops and second-hand book shops I came upon Auckland Unplugged, Coping with Critical Infrastructure Failure,” Marion explains in her artist statement.

    The book reports on the electricity blackout that disrupted Auckland's central business district for five weeks over the summer of 1998 and reveals the vulnerability of a city's infrastructure.

    “This crisis highlights our dependence not only on power supply but also town water supply and waste management and exacerbates a future of unsustainable uncertainty.

    “In attempting to create an artwork that conveys the adverse human impact on the environment, while acknowledging the waterways of the Tamaki Estuary and indeed the many contaminated waterways of Aotearoa,  New Zealand, the book AucklandUnplugged… is ironically reduced to pure carbon (charcoal) to be used as a filtering agent to hypothetically purify (or unblock) our polluted waters.”

    The Estuary Art and Ecology Prize is funded by the Auckland Council’s Howick Local Board and supported by Gordon Harris and the Rice Family Partnership.

    Read more about the prize

    Read more about our Art programmes

     

     

     

  • Science in Action Day a success (Jul 11 2018)

    Talking robots, drones tasked with sports analysis, paper rockets, computer game coding, interactive architectural, engineering and product design displays and chocolate brownies served with a dash of dry ice . . . Otago Polytechnic’s Science in Action Day had something to satisfy every appetite.

    Part of the 2018 International Science Festival in Dunedin, Science in Action Day enables secondary school students to explore the exciting science behind a wide range of programmes offered by Otago Polytechnic.

    The event, held on Tuesday 10 July and centred around the Hub, also featured renowned science educator and communicator Ken Silburn, who conducted a paper rocket launching session before facilitating a hands-on workshop for educators, then making a keynote address at an open public lecture.

    Ken’s hands-on workshop gave educators insights into how he engages students in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

    The future of robotics was also on display.

    Created by SoftBank Robotics in 2006, NAO 6 is an interactive and customisable robot that has become a benchmark in the world of research and education, as well as in healthcare (in retirement homes and hospitals), retail and tourism. Now, many thousands of NAO are being used in more than 70 countries around the world.

    Read about what some of the students thought

  • A passion for science (Jul 09 2018)

    Renowned science educator and communicator Ken Silburn will share his passion and expertise at Otago Polytechnic’s Science in Action Day on Tuesday 10 July.

    Part of the 2018 International Science Festival in Dunedin, Science in Action Day enables secondary school students to explore the exciting science behind a wide range of programmes offered by Otago Polytechnic.

    Ken will run a paper rocket launching session outside the Hub at 3pm, before facilitating a hands-on workshop for educators, then making a keynote address at an open public lecture.

    Internationally renowned in science education, especially in the area of environmental and space science, Ken is a recognised Global Teacher Ambassador, having been acknowledged as one of the top 10 teachers in the world (from more than 23,000 nominations) through the Varkey Global Teacher Prize.

    Passionate about teaching 21st-century skills and increasing the educational opportunities of students on a global scale, Ken is also the recipient of the prestigious Dr Paul Brock Medal from the Australian College of Educators.

    Ken’s hands-on workshop will give educators insights into how he engages students in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

    Other Science in Action Day activities include: sports match analytics; flying the latest sports drone; performing CPR on a simulator; bridge building; Information Technology projects; interactive food activities.

    The future of robotics will also be on display at Otago Polytechnic.

    Created by SoftBank Robotics in 2006, NAO is an interactive and customisable robot that has become a benchmark in the world of research and education, as well as in healthcare (in retirement homes and hospitals), retail and tourism.

    Now, many thousands of NAO are being used in more than 70 countries around the world.

    Note: The meet-a-robot session at Otago Poytechnic’s Hub at 9.30am Tuesday 10 July has been sold out.

    Science in Action Day will be held at Otago Polytechnic, Forth Street, Dunedin, on Tuesday 10 July (9.00am-4.30pm).

    Ken Silburn’s Science in Action Educators Workshop will be held at Manaaki, Otago Polytechnic, Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, on Tuesday 10 July, from 4.30pm. The workshop will conclude with complimentary drinks and nibbles, prior to Ken’s keynote address at 6.30pm in G Block, Room G106.

    Otago Polytechnic is proud to sponsor the International Science Festival.

  • Snowsport stars gain avalanche expertise (Jul 06 2018)

    A posse of snowsport stars are gaining expert insights into avalanche risk management through Otago Polytechnic.

    Winter Olympians Jossi Wells, Miguel Porteous and Finn Bilous, Freeride World Tour competitor Craig Murray, Freeride World Tour Qualifier competitor Julian Hampton and Multisport athlete Hamish Fleming are set to descend on Otago Polytechnic's Wanaka Campus where they will take part in a block course of practical assessments from 8-14 July.

    The cohort are enrolled in the New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management (Level 5) at Otago Polytechnic, the most experienced provider of avalanche education in New Zealand.

    The 12-week course, which began in late April, provides participants with a solid understanding of theory, which is delivered online over 10 weeks and includes weekly web seminar sessions to answer questions and refine concepts. 

    During this period, participants are also required to practise their on-snow skills. They then undertake one week of practical and assessment. This is followed by one week of reflection, during which they evaluate their next steps and plan any re-assessment as required. 

    Learning outcomes include:

    • Identifying and communicating potential avalanche hazards by applying knowledge of snowpack, weather, terrain and avalanche phenomena (30 credits)

    • Mitigating risk to self by selecting and applying appropriate control methods while operating in avalanche terrain within scope of practice (5 credits)

    • Participating as part of a small party rescue by applying appropriate avalanche search and rescue skills while mitigating risks (5 credits)

    The qualification can lead to the New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management (Level 6). 

    Enrolments for the next 12-week programme, from 9 July to 30 September (Practical block course in Wanaka,16-22 September) are currently being wait-listed.

    Read more about our New Zealand Certificate in Avalanche Risk Management

  • Community groups’ efforts recognised (Jul 06 2018)

    United Way, Otago Polytechnic and the Dunedin City Council celebrated community spirit with a grants award ceremony at Otago Polytechnic on Thursday 5 July.

    Dunedin councillor Marie Laufiso, Deputy Chair Community and Culture Committee, represented Mayor Dave Cull as special guest at the event, at which 30 Otago community groups received more than $170,000 in funding.

    “United Way and our partners work hard to raise money and resources in the community, so we can help families and people in the Otago community who are being left behind,” Teresa Moore, CEO United Way, says.

    “Special thanks go to Phil Ker, CEO Otago Polytechnic, for its Charity House project.  This outstanding training project for students results in the community benefiting every year through United Way redistributing by way of grant allocations,” Teresa says.

    Each year for the past 11 years, Otago Polytechnic carpentry students have built a four-bedroom home with guidance from lecturers and the generous support of more than 20 local businesses. The finished Charity House is auctioned and all proceeds go to United Way.

    “Special thanks also go to the team at Mercy Hospital, who allow us to manage their funds for best use in the community,” Teresa says.

    “Grant money also comes from the generous individuals who donate or payroll give to United Way so we can redistribute funds into the community.

    “The total amount we are distributing into the Otago community this year is $173,180.  

    “We are looking for more donations from the community for next year’s funding. We can build this fund by attracting more donations, corporate sponsorship and payroll giving and building on our Otago endowment fund.

    “This collective funding can make a real difference to the amount we can allocate.

    “Special thanks go to The Tindall Foundation, who charge United Way with managing their community grant distribution in Otago and in many other areas throughout New Zealand,” Teresa says.

     

  • “Once-in-a-lifetime” opportunity (Jul 03 2018)

    Hanri de Bruin is preparing for what she describes as a “once-in-a-lifetime” opportunity.

    The second-year Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Electrical) learner will attend the International Summer Academy in Engineering for Women at the University of Applied Science Upper Austria from 10-25 July.

    The Summer Academy’s intensive, two and a-half week programme combines sophisticated theory with hands-on practical experience. In addition to the general programme, each participant can choose a three-day specialised module in Natural Sciences, Engineering and Technology or Computer Science and Informatics.

    “This is really exciting,” says Hanri, who leaves for Austria on Wednesday 4 July and will return at the end of the month. “It’s pretty much all I have been thinking of for the last few months.”

    Hanri, who is specialising in Mechatronics for her degree, is particularly interested in Natural Sciences as well as Computer Science and Informatics.

    “Natural Sciences looks at a wide range of things, including prosthetics and how technology gets integrated within them.

    “However, after contemplating the range of Summer Academy specialities long and hard, as well as thinking about my employment path in the future, I am considering the Computer Science module as it involves a lot of topics that I’m also very interested in.

    “Augmented/Virtual Reality and Automotive Computing are both big interests of mine.”

    Virtual Reality offers a vast number of outcomes, from gaming to medical intervention, Hanri says.

    “I think VR will be a massive development in all engineering departments. I would like to get into robotics/mechatronics and the options for VR in this area is huge. We could develop VR programmes that we can use to hone how we build machines/robots.

    “Technology is always changing and can be hard to keep up with, so I think the Summer Academy will help outline what advances are being made.

    “Staying up to date is very important for my future career in the engineering industry.”

    Hanri says she is grateful for the help she has received from Otago Polytechnic.

    “This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance. I have been able to take up this amazing opportunity because of the financial help of Otago Polytechnic’s Education Foundation.

    “I also can’t thank Liz White, Study Aboard and Exchange Coordinator, enough for everything she has done for me to make this experience happen.”

    Hanri is also aware the International Summer Academy in Engineering for Women offers experiences beyond the classroom.

    “It’s a great chance to meet other women who love the things that I love.

    “We currently have a Facebook chat going and the other girls seem to be very excited, too. We are all keen to learn new things as well as share our knowledge.

    “I’m very keen to learn how engineering differs between cultures.”

    Read more about our Engineering programmes

    Read more about the International Summer Academy in Engineering for Women

     

  • Public Panel: Art and Innovation: NZ top climate scientists and artists panel (Jul 03 2018)
    30 JULY, 5.30PM-7.30PM, DUNEDIN FRINGE FESTIVAL OFFICE, 26 PRINECES STREET, DUNEDIN
    Together with two of NZ's top climate scientists, Prof. James Renwick and Tim Naish, and Founder of Track Zero, Sarah Meads, TrackZero is visiting 10 locations around NZ at an national roadshow event near you.

    We’ll be discussing with local creative practitioners and others how we can inspire climate action through creative arts projects. We would love you to join in the conversation! Explore how more can be done, working with the power of the arts to tackle climate change - the biggest cultural challenge of our time. Panel presenters include Pam McKinlay (Dunedin School of Art) will co-presenting with Dr Jenny Rock (Science Communication) and Ruth Evans (Dunedin ENVOY, 2018) and Jenna Packer.
    FREE EVENT. Light refreshments available courtesy of the Fringe Festival Office and TrackZero.

    Head over to our Eventbrite page to be part of the conversation at a free public event near you.
     
  • Public Seminars, Performances, Workshops: Fu Institute (Jul 02 2018)

     3 SEP - 5 OCT, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, 19 RIEGO STREET.

     Dunedin School of Art and Fu Institute present:

    The Cosmic Twins

    Performances | Public Seminars | Workshops

     

    Artist with Issues, by Yves Gore, 13 SPE at 12PM, P152 Lecture Room, Dunedin School of Art

    There’s always something wrong with life and there’s no “perfect” time to make art, but the artist must find his or her own way to maim their own personal struggles and transform them into art. Yves Gore examines how artists can develop habits in their unique personal lives, experiment courageously while studying the biographies of artists they look up to, so they can develop their own mastery and identity in art.

    Yves Gore is a multimedia artist from Borneo Island, who grew up in Auckland and is living in Los Angeles. Her medium ranges from illustration, performance art and writing narratives for literary fiction, films to video games with funding from Auckland University, NZ Lottery Grants and Auckland City Council. Yves Gore’s works have been exhibited in MadeinLA in Los Angeles, ArtStation in Auckland, TRANSCINEMA in Lima, Peru, Hypergonar in Avignon France and VISIONS DU REEL festival in Nyon, Switzerland. She has taught subjects on Staying Creative, Managing Depression, and How to Survive a Comic Convention in Los Angeles. Yves Gore currently working on her biopunk novel, and she is also the co-founder of FU INSTITUTE.

     

    Who Does the Artist Think She Is? by Frank Fu, 27 SEP, 12PM, P152 Lecture Room, Dunedin School of Art

    Come and moan at FU INSTITUTE, through an afternoon free moaning session towards issues we the artists facing today, from resistance, representations, to relationships, and everything else in between. Let’s get rejected/ejected!

    Born in Inner Mongolia, China. Frank Fu is a performance artist. His work challenges the white box settings of galleries and museums, his endurance performances and interventions examine his identity as an artist, often commenting on the politics of the art world. His work has shown at Venice Biennale, Documenta, Sydney Biennale, Asian Contemporary Art Fair (NYC), Asian Contemporary Art Week (NYC), Rubin Museum of Art (NYC), Centre Pompidou (Paris), Locarno Film Festival, Vision Du Réel (Switzerland) and Transcinema (Peru) . Frank Fu has also been featured on networks and publications such as NHK (Japan), CCTV4 (China), ARTCO (Taiwan), The National Business Review, New Zealand Herald, Listener Magazine, Frieze Magazine, TateShots, etc. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles with his cosmic twin Yves Gore. Frank Fu is the founder and head of school at FU INSTITUTE.

     

     

  • What's Hot! Four speakers, presented by the Otago Institute of Arts & Sciences (Jul 02 2018)
    1 AUGUST, 5.30PM HUTTON THEATRE, OTAGO MUSEUM
    Four speakers take ten minutes each to describe the big breakthroughs or events in their research and practice during the last year.
     
    What's hot in Animal Law? 
    Marcelo Rodriguez Ferrere, Faculty of Law, U. Otago
     ​
    What's hot in Nanotechnology?
    Carla Meledandri, Department of Chemistry, U. Otago
     
    What's hot in Anatomical Knitting?
    Michele Beevors, Sculpture and Ceramics, Otago Polytechnic
     
    What's hot in Otago's Whale and Dolphin Fossils?  
    Ewan Fordyce, Department of Geology, U. Otago
     
    WHEN:     5.30pm, Wednesday 1st August
    WHERE:     Hutton Theatre, Otago Museum
    HOW:         ​FREE ENTRY
     
  • Tapuae Gym – semester break hours (Mon 2 - Sat 21 July) (Jul 02 2018)

    Our Tapuae Gym is still open over the semester break so we hope to see you there! Our opening hours are: 

    • Monday: 6.00am-7.00pm 
    • Tuesday: 8.00am-4.30pm 
    • Wednesday: 6.00am-7.00pm 
    • Thursday: 8.00am-4.30pm 
    • Friday: 6.00am-4.30pm 
    • Saturday: 9.00am-12.00am 
    • Sunday: Closed 

    Lunchtime classes are still running during the week of Monday 2 - Friday 6 July, 2018. 

  • Encouraging fresh approach to litter (Jun 30 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Dunedin School of Art student Siau-Jiun Lim is harnessing the power of social media in an effort to improve the environment.

    As part of Plastic Free July, she has set up a Facebook page, Click n’ Pick Dunedin, aimed at encouraging residents to not only remove any rubbish or litter they may find, but document each occasion by taking a photo and posting it online.

    “When you see rubbish on the street, in the bush or even in a river, simply take a photo of the rubbish before picking it up and share your photo on my Facebook page. People can leave feedback on where they picked up the rubbish, too.

    “Alternatively, people can email me and I will post to social media on their behalf,” says Ms Lim, who is completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours).

    She encourages participants to use a “hand-grabber tool”, tongs or gloves to pick up rubbish. Once collected, rubbish can be disposed of in a bin or by recycling.

    A graphic designer at Otago Polytechnic, Ms Lim’s project begins on Sunday 1 July and requires participants to collect, photograph and dispose of rubbish over a 12-day period of their choice.

    The concept is inspired by environmental psychology, an interdisciplinary field that focuses on the interplay between individuals and their surroundings, encompassing natural environments, social settings, built environments, learning environments, and informational environments.

    Ms Lim says the project has another potential benefit – fitness.

    “Let’s document how much rubbish is in our local environment, while going on regular walks in the winter.”

    Visit Click n' Pick Dunedin

    Email Jiun

     

  • Art Science Exhibition - International Science Festival and Puaka Matariki (Jun 23 2018)

    9 - 13 JULY, COMMUNITY GALLERY, 20 PRINCES STREET, (next to the Octagon), DUNEDIN

    Come and join us for a celebration of our oceans in the Community Gallery as part of the International Science Festival and Puaka Matariki.

    Ōku Moana is an art exhibition with story-telling, science demonstrations and hands on art making activities. Lots to see and plenty to do for the whole family. Stop by for an hour or the day at Ōku Moana.

    We invite you to take part in our mix of sci-art at the International Science Festival 2018 and Puaka Matariki. Join us for a veritable smorgasboard of marine stories, visuals, workshops and hands-on art based activities. We will take a paddle along the shores of the near future to see what influence 2º warming will have on the everyday life of our marine neighbours in the Otago Harbour. We take you out of the lab and into the gallery, exploring science through ARTiculation.

    Come on our journey as we look into the waters that surround us and pose the pressing questions. Can you limbo in a kelp forest? Can Nemo find himself? How high is the ocean – how deep is the sky? What is the secret life of periwinkles and the King of France? From the creators of Shell-shocked comes a new mollusk mystery - The case of the disappearing pipi and what the paua knew. Stand by us as we unmask the evil twin of global warming in the Bull and the burning ocean and other modern tales from the sea. Roving storytellers retell the old stories from the Titans, the Celts and Aotearoa through the lens of kaitiakitanga in our natural world, where land meets the sea along the coast and harbours of Te Tai o Araiteuru.

    Working in collaboration with local artists, musicians, weavers, film makers and scientists we merge the data with art and interactive displays, hands on art activities, workshops and storytelling to give the low down on what “going beyond” the numbers will mean for Ōtepoti Dunedin as we adapt to the new normal in a changing climate world.

    Check our daily meet the scientist sessions, embossed print sessions with Lynn Taylor & Jenny Rock and puppet guided-tours with Kaitrin McMullan (bookings on eventbrite).

    Ōku Moana, (My Oceans) is a satellite exhibition of ART+OCEANS in the International Science and Puaka Matariki Festivals co-curated by Pam McKinlay and Dr Jenny Rock.

    Artists taking part include Marion Wassenaar, Pam McKinlay Vivien Dwyer, Lynn Taylor, Jenny Rock, Jesse-James Pickery, Arati Kushwaha, Jane Venis, Tori Clearwater and Science Communication Students Creative Visualisation projects. We would like to acknowledge the support of Dunedin City Council Creative Communities and Puaka Matariki Komiti for this event.

    http://www.scifest.org.nz/events/ku-moana

    https://matarikidunedin.co.nz/events/

     

     

     

  • Learners bound for China courtesy of PM scholarships (Jun 22 2018)

    More than a dozen Otago Polytechnic students will expand their horizons courtesy of Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Asia.

    Three Sports and Exercise students will undertake a six-week programme in Shanghai, China, that is focused on physical conditioning.

    The Post Graduate Diploma of Applied Science learners will be involved in a collaborative physical conditioning group project that aims to connect emerging strength and conditioning coaches within the code of American Football.

    Described as a “cross-cultural collaborative sports training programme”, the project builds on previous work by Brendon Timmins, Principal Lecturer, Institute of Sport and Adventure, Otago Polytechnic, who visited Shanghai Institute of Technology in 2014 and again in 2017.

    Notably, the students’ supervisor, Matthew Blair, Principal Lecturer, Institute of Sport and Adventure, is the lead physical conditioning coach for the International Rugby Board’s referee training programme, as well as for the Oceania development region.

    “The relationships developed by these two staff will allow the students not only access but also provide the support they need to be successful in this project,” says Megan Gibbons, Head of College, Institute of Sport and Adventure, Otago Polytechnic.

    In addition, a cohort of nine third-year students from Otago Polytechnic’s Fashion and Communication Design programmes will visit a range of Chinese tertiary institutions following the latest round of Prime Minister’s Scholarships.

    “The School of Design at Otago Polytechnic is passionate about the internationalisation of its students, graduates and staff,” says Dr Margo Barton, Head of Fashion.

    “We believe that international awareness, skills and experiences — many being soft skills — will strengthen New Zealand’s education outcomes and the ability to trade with our Asian friends.

    “We have considerable experience of working with partners in China on the Shanghai Dunedin Sister City Fashion Communication Project, which has been running since 2012.

    “Design, in particular, is a vibrant field with a strong international culture. Being able to have our students engage with design outside of the country enhances the quality of the design degree.

    “The experiences and impressions the students bring back with them will give added dimensions to the programme here at Otago Polytechnic, and stimulate a curiosity in their classmates to travel.”

    In addition, Otago Polytechnic second-year Bachelor of Design (Fashion) student Emma Corbett has received an individual scholarship and will spend four months at Donghua University, Shanghai.

    “I’m so happy to see that the PMSA has supported student Emma to study at Donghua University, arguably one of Chinas top fashion universities. This experience will surely set her up for a very successful, internationally connected fashion career.”

    The Prime Minister's Scholarship for Asia aims to strengthen New Zealand's ability to engage with key Asian trading partners, as well as improve the skills of the workforce.

  • Tuning into kaleidoscopic world of The Chills (Jun 21 2018)

    A group of Otago Polytechnic Communication Design students have been tuning into the kaleidoscopic world of Dunedin band The Chills in recent weeks. 

    Six third-year Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design (Communication) students have collaborated with Chills founder Martin Phillipps, Otago Museum Head of Design Craig Scott, curator Michael Findlay, of Museograph, and others to create the exhibition “Things Change: Martin Phillipps and The Chills”, which opens at Otago Museum on Saturday 23 June.

    Busting out of this university town at the bottom of the world in the early 1980s, The Chills were at the forefront of the musical movement that became labelled the “Dunedin Sound”.

    Early singles Pink Frost, Rolling Moon, Doldrums and Kaleidoscope World, released on iconic independent music label Flying Nun Records in the early 1980s, saw The Chills become the darlings of US college radio along with the likes of R.E.M. and the Pixies.

    Supported by a range of international labels (including Warners/Slash and London Records), The Chills’ music seeped into lounges in the UK, Europe and the US.

    Breakthrough album Submarine Bells and single Heavenly Pop Hit reached No 1 and No 2 respectively on the New Zealand charts in 1990. The same year, the band packed the Dunedin Town Hall.

    However, late last year, Martin Phillipps received a dire medical prognosis, resulting in a desire to preserve the legacy of himself and the band. Always a collector and archivist, he has now picked apart a lifetime of memories and discovered precious items that will be showcased within the exhibition.

    Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design (Communication) students Scott Kingsbury, Mitchell Allen, Shaun Funnell, Mary-Jean Heap, Jessie Hamilton and Josh Caldwell have worked on elements of the exhibition for the past six weeks as part of their third-year portfolios.

    “We did lots of research about The Chills as we didn’t really know much about them,” the students explained.

    “It also helped that one of our lecturer, Martin Kean, was actually in the band for a time. And Craig Scott is a former Otago Polytechnic student, so it’s good to have that connection.”

    The group worked on two key installations.

    One is a structure comprising old TV sets, which display footage of the band as well as of locations around Dunedin, revealing how Phillipps sometimes gained inspiration from the landscape.

    The other is a graphic chronology — a band family tree.

    “We got lots of sketches and files from Martin Phillipps himself and had a range of audio material, too, including interviews, live gig recordings and music videos. Looking at The Chills’ album covers and videos, we were able to build on certain themes.

    “The experience has helped give us a deeper understanding of an aspect of Dunedin’s cultural history.

    “We’re really excited to see it all put together.”

    The exhibition and the process of its creation is being captured by Notable Pictures, as part of a feature-length film documentary expected to premiere internationally early in 2019.

    See it: “Things Change: Martin Phillipps and The Chills” is a free exhibition, and will be located in the H.D. Skinner Annex, Otago Museum, from Saturday 23 June to Sunday 15 July 2018.

    Read more about our Bachelor of Design (Communication)

  • “Tech heaven” for local schoolgirls (Jun 21 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic will become “tech heaven” for more than 30 secondary schoolgirls from Dunedin and South Otago on Tuesday 26 June, during the region’s annual ShadowTech day.

    ShadowTech is an award-winning education programme organised by NZTech, providing girls in years 9 to 11 an opportunity to experience what working in a tech job is like, encouraging them onto education pathways that lead into tech related roles.

    With the regional event hosted by Otago Polytechnic, the event pairs girls at school with female mentors in the tech industry. They’ll spend the day with their mentor, learning about the wide range of tech careers available and how I.T. is used in real-world business applications, before returning to Otago Polytechnic to hear inspiring speeches by industry experts.

    “We can’t wait to create tech heaven for these students and show them there’s more to technology than sitting behind a computer, writing lines of code all day” says Dr Emilie Crossley from Otago Polytechnic. “It would be fantastic to see some of the girls who are part of ShadowTech back here in a few years, studying one of our Information Technology programmes.”

    This year, more than 600 girls, 100 companies and 250 mentors are participating in ShadowTech nationwide. The programme aims to encourage more girls to take science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) subjects at school, which can allow them to study technology at tertiary level and broaden their future career possibilities.

    ShadowTech is run by TechWomen, part of the NZTech community.

    TechWomen Executive Director Edwina Mistry says: “ShadowTech makes girls realise that there are a lot more different opportunities for tech jobs than they imagined.”

    Only three percent of 15-year-old New Zealand girls consider a career in tech, which has the highest paid and highest qualified employees. In 2017, 36 percent of computer science and information technology students were female, and eight percent were Maori.

    “What sets ShadowTech apart from other youth development programmes is the wide range of roles and industries that are showcased; breaking down preconceived ideas about tech careers,” says Mistry.

    Read more about ShadowTech

  • Graduate plays crucial role in All Blacks’ campaign (Jun 18 2018)

    Talk about hitting the ground running.

    Hayden Chapman started his new job as assistant performance analyst with the All Blacks at the start of June. Less than two weeks later, the Rugby World Cup champions began their three-test series against France.

    A combination of fitness, flair and determination has helped the All Blacks to two successive test wins. Yet, as the third test at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium looms this weekend, Hayden is all too aware that success in elite-level sport is often the result of many small things done well.

    Which is where Hayden comes in.

    He specialised in Performance Analysis at Otago Polytechnic, gaining a Graduate Diploma in Applied Science in 2015, a qualification that directly led to him being employed by the Highlanders Super Rugby franchise, which won the competition that year.

    Hayden has remained with the Highlanders since. In fact, his contract with the Rugby New Zealand covers both the All Blacks and the Super franchise, meaning he can bounce between the roles depending on requirements.

    “It’s pretty exciting,” Hayden says.

    “I’d say most people in this field would strive to work with the top team in its code – and the All Blacks are.

    “Growing up, I always wanted to be an All Black, but I wasn’t quite talented enough, so this is the next best thing,” says Hayden, who will also be involved in the All Blacks’ Investec Rugby Championship campaign against Australia, South Africa and Argentina starting in August as well as their traditional northern hemisphere tour in November.

    The field of Performance Analysis is focused primarily on the technical and tactical elements of the game. This means Hayden is often granted a front-row view of some of the best athletes in the world.

    He films training sessions and collates footage from matches, then sorts or “codes” it, depending on what his coaching team wants. For example, sometimes he’ll focus on a specific player’s technique, or zoom in on set pieces to see what can be improved.

    “I attend coaches’ meetings to help them prepare the team as best they can. Everyone is working towards getting the players to perform at their best.

    “You have to communicate with the coaches and find out what information they need regarding players and sessions. You also analyse your own performances, to see how you could do better next time.”

    This notion could be applied to Hayden’s time at Otago Polytechnic, too.

    As he advanced through his Bachelor of Applied Science, Hayden saw a career path open before him, aided by a range of opportunities facilitated by his tutors, who have strong relationships with a range of sporting groups, including Otago Rugby and the Southern Steel netball franchise.

    “I did some internships, including with the Otago rugby team, then the Highlanders in 2015, which turned into a paid role,” Hayden says.

    “Otago Polytechnic gave me the opportunity to get to where I am now.”

    Read more about our Sport and Exercise programmes

  • Public Seminar: Art/Science and Climate Change (Jun 18 2018)

    THURSDAY 21 JULY 2018, 12 NOON - 1PM, P152,DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN


    Climate change offers artists very specific opportunities for art/science and public art engagements. Artists of all kinds can bring into sensory awareness climate change’s impacts in the social, environmental, economic and cultural ecologies we inhabit and generate. The Paris Agreement of 2015 insisted on the need for bottom-up, community-driven engagement with climate change, pointing out that its impacts reflect social inequalities as well as environmental degradation. This presentation provides examples of how artists have used different infrastructures to generate new understandings of climate change. These include educational institutional frameworks, public art strategies, environmental strategies and public/private engagements. 

    Bridie Lonie is an Emeritus Member of Otago Polytechnic, Te Kura Matatini ki Otago. She is enrolled in the PhD programme of the Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago and has recently submitted for examination the dissertation Closer Relations: Art, Climate Change, interdisciplinarity and the Anthropocene.  She worked on the development of Ara Toi ¯Otepoti – Our Creative Future,the Dunedin Arts and Culture Strategy.

  • Innovation aplenty at I.T. showcase (Jun 15 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information Technology students will showcase a range of solutions they’ve developed for real-world clients today, Friday 15 June.

    The mid-year exhibition, starting at 5.30pm in D Block, will highlight the potential benefits of student and industry partnerships, as well as shine a light on ways in which our students have harnessed new technological advancements.

    “The showcase celebrates the technical and professional proficiency of our third-year project students as they prepare to join the IT industry,” says Adon Moskal, Project Coordinator Bachelor of Information Technology programme, [JG1] Otago Polytechnic.

    “The projects are designed, developed, managed and supported entirely by the students themselves, playing to the individual strengths and interests of our cohort each semester.”

    Take the opportunity to come and talk to our Bachelor of Information Technology students about their projects, including: The Internet of Things; machine learning; Web development; mobile development; games development; a robot garden — Farmbot; community I.T. help-desk; I.T. event filming and promotion; creating community self-help material; Hardware Lab maintenance and replacement plan; creative student movies.

    The I.T Student showcase will be held at D Block, Otago Polytechnic, Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, today, Friday 15 June (5.30pm-8.00pm).

    Read more about our 2018 and 2019 Information Technology programmes.

     

  • OPEN DAY: Dunedin School of Art (Jun 14 2018)

    25 AUGUST 2018, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART
    OPEN DAY AND WORKSHOPS

    The Dunedin School of Art is offering FREE workshop experiences in their world-class facilities for Open Day.

    If you’d like to try out a specific technique, or are interested in what they get up to, please come along.
    The workshops are suitable for anyone - no prior experience required.

    Studio workshops include: > Ceramics > Drawing > Painting > Photography > Jewellery & Metalsmithing > Printmaking > Textiles

    Tours of the school will be available during the Open Day. For those interested in studying in 2019, bring along copies of your artwork or portfolio to discuss with school staff a provisional placement for 2019.

    For more information:
    artadmin@op.ac.nz
    0800 762 786 or
    www.op.ac.nz/art


    Date: Saturday, 25 August,
    Time: 10am-3pm
    Venue: Dunedin School of Art, Riego St (off Albany St)


    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED
    - Turn up on the day and have a go!

  • Distinguished Alumni Awards 2018: Chris Weaver (Jun 14 2018)

    Distinguished Alumni Awards 2018

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni are notable for their contribution to society. Sixteen former students were honoured at the ceremony which was held on 11 May, 2018.

    Chris Weaver

    Diploma in Fine and Applied Arts (Distinction in Design and Sculpture) (1976), Certificate in Ceramics (1976)

    Studio Potter

    Growing up in a family of five boys, Chris Weaver learned quickly that he wanted something he had to make it with what he had at hand, or go without. 

    He built a potter’s wheel while at high school and taught himself to make pots. He then headed to the Dunedin School of Art in the early 70s and turned a necessity into a lifelong  passion.

    Based on the West Coast, Chris has won many awards — too many to list them all— and undertaken a range of prestigious international residencies. He produces new work for at least one exhibition every year, and his work has been exhibited widely.

    His collections are held in numerous prominent institutions, including the Auckland War Memorial Museum; The Dowse Art Museum; Shepparton Art Museum, Australia; and Mino Ceramic Park in Tajimi, Japan.

    Yet despite all the accolades, he remains down to earth and ever-curious.

    This from the Otago Potters’ Group, which hosted Chris for a weekend masterclass last year:

    “While we were all aware of his status in the art world . . . the calm, meditative way in which this modest artist demonstrated his techniques  . . . was inspiring.”

    Chris’ career includes the following highlights:
    > 1993 Norsewear Art Award for Ceramics
    > 1994 Norsewear Art Award - Merit Award
    > 1995 New Zealand Society of Potters - Merit Award
    > 1996 Fletcher Challenge Ceramics Award - Finalist
    > 1995 Awarded Creative New Zealand grant to travel and study in the United States, the United Kingdom and Ireland.
    > 2007 One of six New Zealand potters invited to undertake a residency at FuLe International Ceramic Art Museum, in Fuping, China.
    > 2010 Invited as an Artist in Residence at the Sturt Arts Centre in Mittagong, Australia
    > Collections held in the Auckland War Memorial Museum; The Dowse Art Museum; the Suter Art Gallery, Nelson; Canterbury Museum; Hawkes Bay Museum, Napier; Shepparton Art Museum, Australia; and Mino Ceramic Park in Tajimi, Japan

  • Distinguished Alumni Awards 2018: Holly Zandbergen (Jun 14 2018)

    Distinguished Alumni Awards 2018

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni are notable for their contribution to society. Sixteen former students were honoured at the ceremony which was held on 11 May, 2018.

  • Public Exhibition: Viv Dwyer - First Do No Harm (Jun 14 2018)

    25-29 JUNE, 2018, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    First Do No Harm
    Vivien Dwyer

     

    EXHIBITION DATES
    25 - 29 June, 2018

     

    EXHIBITION CLOSING
    Friday June 29th
    5pm – 7pm

     

    GALLERY HOURS
    Monday to Friday
    10am – 4pm

  • Symposium: Costume and Textiles Assoc. of NZ & Schools of Design and Art at Otago Polytechnic (Jun 14 2018)

    21-23 SEP, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART AND OTAGO POLYTECHNIC HUB and G BLOCK

    Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium, is organised in partnership with the Costume, Textile Association of New Zealand (CTANZ)the School of Design and The Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic – Te Kura Matatini ki Otago.

    CTANZ is a national organisation that provides a forum for the study, research and conservation of dress and textiles. Established in 2002, this will be the 18th national presentation of the symposium.

     

    The exhibition, Unbound opens Friday 21st September to launch Unbound: Liberating Women; A Symposium in the DSA Gallery, The Dunedin School of Art (evening is open to the public). (Details to come)

     

    The symposium will be held in The HUB and G Block on Saturday 22 & Sunday 23 September, 2018. (Programme to come)

     

    Unbound Exhibition

    22 September – 18 October 2018

    The Dunedin School of Art Gallery, Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand

    The exhibition Unbound is a quality assured, peer-reviewed project curated by Dr Natalie Smith and Victoria Bell

     

  • Public Symposium: Call for Abstracts - Mauri Ora | Human Flourishing (Jun 14 2018)

    30 JULY DEADLINE, See details below.

    The M¯aori Research Symposium, Mauri Ora: Human Flourishing, to be held on 9 November, aims to showcase M¯aori research undertaken at Otago Polytechnic. The second M¯aori symposium hosted by the Polytechnic, it follows the inaugural T¯a Moko Symposium held in 2014.

    The symposium aims to nurture research conducted by M¯aori staff and students – that is, research undertaken by M¯aori, for M¯aori, or with M¯aori; as well as provide opportunities to share M¯aori research fields and expertise and celebrate the depth and breadth of M¯aori research conducted at Otago Polytechnic.

    Otago Polytechnic encourages presenters at Mauri Ora: Human Flourishing Symposium to submit abstracts for five presentation options: 20-minute presentation; 20/20 slideshow; 10-minute round-table presentation; 5-minute research idea presentation; poster presentation.

    Submissions for peer-reviewed full papers (for potential inclusion in the 2019 SCOPE: Kaupapa K¯ai Tahu publication) are also invited from staff and students involved in M¯aori-led and/or partnered research. 

    Presentation abstracts are due by 30 July.

    Submissions for the peer-reviewed full paper and potential inclusion in the 2019 SCOPE: Kaupapa K¯ai Tahu publication are due by 29 October.

    For more information, visit or contact kelli.temaiharoa@op.ac.nz

  • Public Seminar: Measuring the impact of Art - Lesley Brook (Jun 09 2018)

    14 JUNE, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Measuring the impact of Art
     
    Someone walks into an exhibition, looks around at the artworks, and leaves. How can the artists, art historians and curators involved in the exhibition find out what impact that exhibition had, on the individuals who experienced it and on the community more generally 63 art case studies the United Kingdom’s Research Excellence Framework 2014 show that it is possible to measure the impact of art, but also reveal opportunities to strengthen the evidence of impact by improving the variety and quality of types of evidence used and by justifying the inferences and assumptions relied upon.
     
    Lesley Brook is a Portfolio Assistant in the Research and Postgraduate Studies at Otago Polytechnic. This research was presented at the Association of Research Managers and Administrators conference in Liverpool in 2017 and published in The Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society.
     

     

  • Dylan's designs turn heads in London (Jun 08 2018)

    Dylan McCutcheon-Peat has been turning a few heads in London this week, his innovative fashion collection subverting more traditional notions of masculinity.

    The Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate recently packed his bags and headed to the prestigious Graduate Fashion Week.

    His collection, “Is he a Tomgirl?”, featured at the Swarovski International Fashion Award Show in London’s East End on Wednesday 6 June and prompted the following comments by fashion writer Anna Tank:

    “By disregarding conventional concepts of proportioning to female and male models’ bodies, many of the designs exhibited changed ideas of how fashion should communicate with gender.

    “Dylan McCutcheon-Peat prominently presented this gender-defying trope by outfitting male models in typically female attire.

    “For example, the models were dressed in atypical female materials such as lace and mesh. Furthermore, they were in romanticised dresses and featured slits in trousers. Dylan showcased a completely innovative take on male dressing.”

    Dylan says Graduate Fashion Week is the highlight of his career to date.

    “I only graduated last year. I did iD Fashion Week and that was really big, but this is a whole new level.”

    Dylan developed “Is he a Tomgirl?” last year as part of his final year of a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) at Otago Polytechnic, and it featured alongside work by 45 other designers from around the world at the Emerging Designers’ Show at iD Fashion Week in Dunedin in May, .

     He says he aims to encourage different perceptions of masculinity.

    “It is about making people aware there can also be a fragility to the notion of masculinity. And by using elements of lingerie within the collection, I make it very visible.

    “Everything also has a very tailored aspect to it. The idea is to use tradition to break with tradition.”

    Dr Margot Barton, Otago Polytechnic Head of Fashion, says Otago Polytechnic is the only institution in New Zealand to have been invited to show in London.

    “It’s very exciting. We are supporting Dylan by paying for his registration. Being right there, getting that international exposure, is so important.”

    Dylan, who also received financial support from Otago Polytechnic’s Education Foundation, is being accompanied by fellow Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Ariane Bray, who is “lending a hand”. The pair will spend “three or four months” travelling through Europe before returning to Dunedin.

    However, Dylan is unlikely to remain in Dunedin for long. He has plans to move to Melbourne and set up a bespoke design business.

    “Since graduating I’ve had a fashion design studio in Dunedin, making stuff for people. I plan to do the same in Melbourne.”

    Read more about Graduate Fashion Week

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Design (Fashion)

     

     

     

     

  • Call for Papers: Person-Centred and Experiential Therapies (Jun 08 2018)

    Potential presenters for the Person-Centred and Experiential Therapies Conference are invited to submit a 250-300 word abstract for review. The abstract deadline is Tuesday 10 July 2018. The conference is in Christchurch on 21-22 September 2018. The submission should provide a summary of the intended presentation and an indication of which presentation format (as below).

    Person-centred and experiential therapies have, for many years, held that transformation occurs in client-therapist relationships that foster a sense of safety and allow for encounters at relational depth. Recent advances in neurobiological research show that brain functioning and neural rewiring can be enhanced through these therapies.

    With research underpinning our therapies, facilitating such relationships of co-presence where positive change can occur for clients has become more significant than ever. This is why transformation through relationship is the essence of therapy and the theme of our conference.

    Presentation options

    • 30 minute presentation (including 10 minute questions)
    • 1 hour presentation or workshop (to include question time as required)
    • 1.5 hour experiential workshop

    Send your abstract submission to Beverley Flitton: contact@anderley.net

    Please note: All potential presenters are required to register and pay for their attendance at the conference. We encourage potential presenters to make use of the discounted early bird rate by registering and paying for their attendance as early as possible.

    Click here for the conference website.

  • MOU signed with groundbreaking doctor (Jun 08 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Lance O’Sullivan’s Navilluso Medical Ltd this week, strengthening the ties between two innovative, future-focused organisations.

    The agreement formalises a groundbreaking education initiative that began several months ago, and lays the platform for further collaboration.

    Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year in 2014, Lance has developed iMOKO, an app that enables teachers at participating kohanga, day-care centres and schools to securely send health information about students to a digital health team working from a “cloud” system based in Auckland. They promptly respond with a diagnosis and, importantly, a treatment plan.

    Yet in order for Lance to achieve his iMOKO vision, he needed a tailored learning and credentialing solution for the very people involved at the coalface of children’s health.

    Which is where EduBits come in: they validate Lance’s healthcare staff’s capabilities, developed through experience, in a timely and cost-effective way, ensuring iMOKO’s  workforce has the skills and knowledge needed for success.

    EduBits are ideal for new and emerging skills and knowledge areas, such as Lance’s digital health programme, with a particular focus on new technologies. They can also be tailor-made to satisfy organisation-specific requirements.

    In the case of iMOKO, this entails an ongoing training programme for new digital health aides throughout New Zealand.

    “Navilluso Medical Ltd is excited to be partnering Otago Polytechnic around the micro-credentialing of a new wave of health workers who will enable health service to the people of New Zealand — all at a time that is of the greatest convenience to them,” Lance says.

    “This will allow sustainable models of quality healthcare to be developed and spread.

    “There is a potential undiscovered workforce out there. This method of qualifying enables people to pivot from what they are doing today to what they could be doing, say, next month.”

    Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker says the relationship is proof of how micro-credentials can make an excellent contribution to education in New Zealand.

    “This relationship with Lance and his organisation is just one example of how we can respond very quickly to training requirements – and we have done so.

    “This is the space where we are seeking to build our reputation,” Phil says.

    “Another recent example is in Electric Vehicle training.”

    Otago Polytechnic has created a series of Electric Vehicle (EV) short courses and micro-credentials under its EduBits brand aimed at meeting a growing demand for EV knowledge and validation in New Zealand.

    At the end of each short course, learners are assessed and awarded Otago Polytechnic’s EduBits, which validate what they know and can do.

    “There is strong demand among those working in the automotive industry to increase their skills and knowledge base of EV technology, and to have that capability recognised by industry-endorsed micro-credentials,” Phil says.

    Read more about EduBits

     

  • Coming to aid of Vanuatuan community (Jun 07 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic learners are answering the call of a Vanuatuan community in need.

    In September, 10 students and four staff members from Otago Polytechnic’s School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences will head to the small island of Paama, where they will work on a variety of water and sanitation projects.

    Paama, one of the smaller of the 83 islands that comprise the nation of Vanuatu, is a 40-minute flight north of the capital, Port Vila.

    The project comes on the back of work done by Dunedin’s Highgate Presbyterian Church, which has helped improve infrastructure on the island.

    The Otago Polytechnic students will spend 10 days on Paama, integrating their classroom-based projects and academic theory with important practical, real-world experience.

    Specifically aimed at students who have completed Civil Engineering programmes in Water and Waste Systems and Water and Waste Management, the projects include water disinfection, desalination, pump and gravity-based water systems as well as sanitation.

    They are also focusing on developing long-term sustainable solutions, transferring some of their knowledge and skills to locals as part of a future-focused strategy aimed at building capacity and expertise in the South Pacific.

    Although more than a third of their costs have been covered by Otago Polytechnic, the students are involved in a range of fund-raising activities, including building two sleep-outs (to be auctioned), sausage-sizzles, raffles and a staff quiz night, which will be held on 27 July.

    The group welcomes expressions of interest from organisations interested in sponsoring the students.

    Contact:  Michael Mullens (michael.mullens@op.ac.nz)

    Read about our School of Engineering, Construction and Living Sciences

  • Public Seminar: Where next for the Otago Museum? with Dr Ian Griffin (Jun 06 2018)

    7 JUNE, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Where next for the Otago Museum?

    Dr Ian Griffin, Director: Otago Museum

    2018 marks the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Otago Museum which seems an appropriate occasion to reflect on its past accomplishments, and prognosticate on its future direction.

    Ian Griffin is the 8th Director of the Otago Museum, which first opened in 1868. Joining the Museum in May 2013, Ian has inspired a greater focus on science engagement within the Museum and led the development of the Museums planetarium which opened in December 2015. The Museum will open its new bicultural science centre in December 2017.

    In his spare time, Ian has been actively spreading the message and getting people excited about astronomy, aurora photography and the value of preserving Dunedin’s night skies and currently writes a weekly astronomy column for the Otago Daily times. In recognition of Ian’s contribution to science communication in New Zealand, in 2015 Ian was awarded the Prime Ministers Science Media Communication prize.

    Before joining the Otago Museum, Ian had previously held a number of lead positions in science engagement in the UK and the US including at Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry, at Hubble Telescope Outreach and at NASA’s Education Forum. Ian has also headed, at different times, two planetariums: as CEO of the Stardome Observatory in Auckland and as Director of the Armagh Planetarium in Armagh, Northern Ireland. During Ian’s research for his PhD in astronomy, Ian discovered 26 asteroids, including asteroid 10924 which is named after his wife Maria.

  • Samoan Prime Minister visits Otago Polytechnic (Jun 06 2018)

    The Prime Minister of Samoa, Rt Hon Tuilaepa Dr Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi, is visiting Otago Polytechnic today, Thursday 7 June.

    The Prime Minister was welcomed to Otago Polytechnic with a mihi whakatau at the Hub at 2pm, followed by a meeting with Chief Executive Phil Ker and other staff.

    Other visiting dignitaries included Mrs Gillian Malielegaoi, the Prime Minister’s wife; Agafili Shem Leo, CEO, Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet; His Excellency Leasi Tommy Scanlan, High Commissioner of Samoa to New Zealand, and his wife, Mrs Joyce Scanlan; Professor Helen Nicholson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, External Engagement, University of Otago; and Tofilau Nina Kirifi-Alai, Manager of Pacific Island Centre, Otago University.

    Otago Polytechnic will also join members of the Samoan and Pacific Island community in celebrating the 56th Anniversary of Samoa’s Independence with an event at the Hub tonight, Thursday 7 June, at 5.30pm. This will include an ‘ava ceremony and thanksgiving service, followed by speeches from the Samoan Prime Minister and others.

     

  • Te Pā Tauira officially opened (Jun 01 2018)

    Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village was officially opened by the Hon Dr David Clark today, 1 June. 

    The Minister of Health and MP for Dunedin North, who unveiled a brass plaque at the entrance, was joined by numerous dignitaries, including Otakou kaumātua Edward Ellison, Dunedin City Councillor Aaron Hawkins (representing Mayor Dave Cull), Otago Polytechnic Council Chair Kathy Grant and Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker.

    Other officials included Rob DiQual, CEO Campus Living Villages, which manages the complex. Campus Living Villages is a leader in purpose-built student accommodation, with more than 45,000 beds under management globally.

    Just a short walk from campus and Dunedin’s city centre, the $22 million, 231-bed furnished residential village offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, Te Pā Tauira uses sustainable materials throughout, including laminated timber within its unique structural frame. 

    Its innovative design, construction processes and building materials have been recognised with several award nominations, including in multiple categories in the 2018 Property Council New Zealand Awards and the 2018 NZ Wood-Resene Timber Design Awards.

    Te Pā Tauira, which was officially blessed earlier this year by Kai Tahu representative Tahu Potiki, opened its doors to students in February.

    The name Te Pā Tauira was gifted by Ōtākou Rūnaka in 2017, along with each of the names for the five floors – Hawea, Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu (these are names of the southern tribes who have migrated to the South Island over centuries).

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira

  • Devon heading back to Africa (Jun 01 2018)

    Devon Kilkelly can’t wait to return to Africa.

    The third-year Bachelor of Nursing student at Otago Polytechnic heads to a small fishing village in northern Malawi in late June to celebrate the official opening of a new nursery school building.

    The visit is the latest step in a journey that began in 2015 when Devon embarked on a gap year that took her to Ngara, a fishing village of about 4000 people on the shores of Lake Malawi.

    The six months Devon spent there have been transformative – both for her and the village.

    Devon taught biology and geography at the village high school, helped out at the preschool (called Ngara Nursery) and worked at the local healthcare clinic.

    And witnessing the healthcare needs of the Ngara community prompted Devon to choose nursing as a career when she returned to New Zealand.

    In the three years since she first visited Malawi, she has funded the renovation of Ngara nursery school, implemented and funded daily breakfast (porridge) for the children attending and provided a teacher and resources for Ngara Nursery.

    “The number of children at the nursery has dramatically increased since 2015, from 20 to a current roll of 125 children,” Devon says.

    “All of these children now have a fun, safe and educational environment, enhancing their development.”

    Last year, Devon won a Seven Sharp ASB Good as Gold Award of $10,000. As a direct result of that exposure, she was gifted a children’s playground by Park Supplies, Auckland.  

    "I am travelling to Malawi with my parents and partner (Tomas) to erect the playground and open the new nursery school building,” Devon explains.

    “We are also going to be spending time working alongside the health professionals in the village clinic, where I was first inspired to study a Bachelor of Nursing.”

    "As my mother is a pharmacist and Tomas and I are third-year nursing students, we will use our combined knowledge to support safe practice and safe healthcare in Ngara."

    Devon is also in the process of founding an organisation called "Supporting A Future", with the intention of undertaking new projects within the Ngara community. These include starting a pen pal project with Ngara Nursery and a kindergarten in Greymouth, where Devon grew up.

    Devon is currently working in collaboration with Deep South Technology to develop a website and hopes to launch Supporting A Future on her return to New Zealand in July.

    Read more about our Nursing programmes

  • Holly helping hounds of Rarotonga again (May 30 2018)

    Holly Kendrick has no plans to pack lightly for her forthcoming trip to Rarotonga.

    The Otago Polytechnic School of Veterinary Nursing lecturer heads to the biggest of the Cook Islands on June 29, hoping to have used up every last gram of the 69kg luggage allowance generously granted by Air NZ.

    Holly will fill her bags with collars destined for Rarotonga’s roaming dog population.

    Holly says collars are a precious commodity on the island, which has about 5000 dogs (compared to a human population of around11,000).

    Given the relatively low wages there, a $20 collar isn’t a priority, Holly says, lamenting the fact that uncollared dogs are often shot by the island's animal control service.

    A board member of Te Are Manu, Rarotonga's only veterinary clinic, Holly is working on a long-term plan to micro-chip and de-sex the island’s dogs. However, the collars are a “quick fix” to prevent more owned dogs meeting a grizzly end.

    “Should dogs be found roaming without a collar or registration tag there is a good chance that they might be shot. This is a daily occurrence. The problem with this is, collars are often lost or stolen, meaning family pets are often killed.”

    Holly hopes encouraging owners to collar their canine companions will serve as a step towards responsible dog ownership.

    “Many dogs in Rarotonga live a free-range lifestyle, so making owned dogs more easily identifiable will ensure they are easily reunited should they wander or find themselves in trouble.”

    Holly has set up a give-a-little page to encourage Kiwis to donate a collar (or money to buy one).

    “Te Are Manu is fortunate to be working alongside the Cook Islands SPCA team and my aim is to raise funds which will allow me to take as many collars as possible with me in June to benefit the animals seen by both organisations.

    “Air New Zealand have kindly given me 69kg luggage allowance and I would love to take full advantage of every kilogram.”

    Interested in supporting Holly’s collar drive? Visit her give-a-little page

    Read more about our Veterinary Nursing programmes

  • Otago Polytechnic has the meow factor (May 30 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic learners are set to engage in some feline fun.

    Students (and staff) have been invited to the Hub tomorrow morning to spend some quality time with a collection of adorable kittens in an initiative organised by Otago Polytechnic Chaplain Steve Downey and Animal Rescue.

    “During my past 10 years working at a residential college, we would always have de-stress weeks just before exam times with a therapeutic event each evening. The most popular event was cuddling kittens or playing with puppies,” Steve says.

    “Students always find the interaction with kittens extremely good for their souls.  It is stress-reducing, a happy time, and a break from study and other tasks. 

    “Students living away from home find this particularly therapeutic as they probably don’t have pets with them in Dunedin, whereas back home this may be a familiar thing.

    “With OP’s strong commitment to wellbeing on campus, this is just a small part of the jigsaw to help with the big picture.”

    Steve says that although the event is primarily aimed at students facing exams, staff could benefit, too.

    The event will be held at Otago Polytechnic’s Hub from 11am-1.30pm Thursday 31 May. Gold-coin donation requested to cover the costs of Animal Rescue. 

    Read more about Animal Rescue

     

     

  • TEXpo abuzz with energy and innovation (May 29 2018)

    TEXpo — a showcase of local innovative tech research, products and technology industries held at Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago Business School — provided a buzz of activity, energy and ideas at the weekend.

    Part of Dunedin Techweek, the free, collaborative, cross-campus showcase, attracted about 300 visitors to The Hub on Saturday.

    Feedback from the exhibitors was overwhelmingly positive, many of them taking the opportunity to network with other tech companies, while visitors enjoyed the opportunity to discover the range of exciting technology in our city.

  • Otago Science Awards - nominations open (May 29 2018)

    A call is being made to recognise Otago’s science heroes with nominations now open for the biennial Otago Daily Times Otago Science Awards – a joint initiative between the New Zealand International Science Festival and the ODT. Nominations can be made online via the New Zealand International Science Festival website scifest.org.nz and will close on Thursday 28 June at 5pm. Winners will be announced at the launch of the New Zealand International Science Festival on Friday 6 July.
     
    The Awards – first launched at the 2016 Festival – aims to acknowledge the work of science in our everyday lives and the difference the people committed to the field make, from the region’s scientists to teachers, students, community groups, volunteers and business people.  

    “Following on from the success of the inaugural 2016 Otago Daily Times Otago Science Awards, we’re excited to announce they are happening again with new categories including Science Teacher Award, which recognises excellence in our teaching community, and the Future Scientist Award, recognising our emerging talent,” says New Zealand International Science Festival Director Dan Hendra. 

    “There are many everyday heroes working in Otago who bring science to life or push us to ‘go beyond’, the overriding theme of this year’s Festival. We encourage people to nominate someone that person or group or business that is making a difference to the way we understand our world, whether it’s a national or international contribution – or at a community level.”  

    Awards categories include:

    • The University of Otago – Lifetime Achievement (In recognition to dedication and achievement in the field of sciences
    • The Otago Polytechnic – Sustainability (In recognition of sustainable practices integrated into their work and practice)
    • Otago Museum – Science Communicator (In recognition of excellence in communication in the sciences to a non-science crowd)
    • Vodafone – Business (In recognition of an individual in business that is leading science and innovation)
    • Mitre10 MEGA – Future Scientist (In recognition of a Year 12 or Year 13 student who has undertaken an outstanding science, technology, mathematics or engineering project)
    • ADInstruments – Emerging Scientist (tertiary level student) (In recognition of an emerging scientist in the tertiary sector who is becoming established in their field)
    • Science Into Action – Science Teacher Award (In recognition of a registered primary, intermediate or secondary school teacher who is teaching science, mathematics, technology in the New Zealand curriculum)

    ODT CEO Grant McKenzie says as the region’s preferred media outlet, the newspaper was proud of its science heroes and was thrilled to be supporting the Awards again. “We’ve long been supporters of the New Zealand International Science Festival and regularly enjoy sharing the stories of science and innovation with our readers throughout the region and further afield. We look forward to seeing nominations come in from across Otago as we celebrate these unsung science heroes.”      

  • PM Scholarship for Anna Higgins (May 29 2018)

    Anna Higgins’ decision to continue her studies at Otago Polytechnic just got a big boost.

    Having completed a Graduate Diploma in Applied Science (Performance Analysis), Anna has further cause for celebration – she has been awarded a Prime Minister’s Sport Scholarship to help her study towards a Masters in Applied Science.

    Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson announced the first round of 2018 Prime Minister’s Sport Scholarship recipients at an awards ceremony in Cambridge late last week.

    The announcement comes on the back of Anna taking up a paid internship with Cycling NZ at the beginning of the year.

    She has already been involved in the track cycling World Championships in the Netherlands in March and Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in April, travelling with the team, developing her cycling knowledge and the skills needed for the role.

    Anna, who will focus on cycling performance analysis for her Masters, is no stranger to what’s required to succeed on the world stage. 

    She has represented New Zealand in canoe slalom, competed at World Cup events and was the national under-23 champion as well as being the 2nd-ranked senior (behind

    2016 Rio Olympian Luuka Jones).

    As part of a placement organised by Otago Polytechnic, Anna has been involved in performance analysis for the Southern Steel netball franchise since 2015. Last year the Steel enjoyed an unbeaten run on its path to winning the title.

    Read more about our Physical Activity and Wellbeing programmes

  • Dylan bound for bright lights of London (May 25 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Dylan McCutcheon-Peat is packing his bags — along with a whole bunch of clothes, of course — and heading to the prestigious Graduate Fashion Week in London.

    Dylan has added a few designs to his collection, Is he a Tomgirl?, which featured alongside work by 45 other designers from around the world at the Emerging Designers’ Show at iD Fashion Week in Dunedin earlier this month.

    Dylan says the London event, which begins on 3 June, will be the highlight of his career to date.

    “I only graduated last year. I did iD a few weeks ago and that was really big, but this is a whole new level.

    “As soon as I get off the plane, I’ll go straight to the venue and drop off my garments. I didn’t want to take the risk of couriering them.”

    Dylan, who developed the collection last year as part of his final year of a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) at Otago Polytechnic, says he aims to encourage different perceptions of masculinity.

    “It is about making people aware there can also be a fragility to the notion of masculinity. And by using elements of lingerie within the collection, I make it very visible.

    “Everything also has a very tailored aspect to it. The idea is to use tradition to break with tradition.”

    Dr Margot Barton, Otago Polytechnic Head of Fashion, says Otago Polytechnic is the only institution in New Zealand to have been invited to show in London.

    “It’s very exciting. We are supporting Dylan by paying for his registration. Being right there, getting that international exposure, is so important.”

    Dylan, who also received financial support from Otago Polytechnic’s Education Foundation, will be accompanied by fellow Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design graduate Ariane Bray, who is “lending a hand”. The pair will spend three or four months travelling through Europe before returning to Dunedin.

    However, Dylan is unlikely to remain in Dunedin for long. He has plans to move to Melbourne and set up a bespoke design business.

    “Since graduating I’ve had a fashion design studio in Dunedin, making stuff for people. I plan to do the same in Melbourne.”

    Read more about Graduate Fashion Week

    Read more about Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Design (Fashion)



  • Te Pā Tauira to be officially opened (May 25 2018)

    Te Pā Tauira – Otago Polytechnic Student Village will be officially opened by the Hon Dr David Clark on Friday 1 June at 2pm. 

    The Minister of Health and MP for Dunedin North will be joined by Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull, Otago Polytechnic Council Chair Kathy Grant and Otago Polytechnic CEO Phil Ker.

    Other officials include Rob DiQual, CEO Campus Living Villages, which manages the complex. Campus Living Villages is a leader in purpose-built student accommodation and owns and manages more than 45,000 beds globally.

    Just a short walk from campus and Dunedin’s city centre, the $22 million, 231-bed furnished residential village offers fully-catered single rooms (dorms), self-catered studios (standard or deluxe) and four-bedroom apartments. 

    Constructed with the environment firmly in mind, Te Pā Tauira uses sustainable materials throughout, including laminated timber within its unique structural frame. 

    Its innovative design, construction processes and building materials have been recognised with several award nominations, including in multiple categories in the 2018 Property Council New Zealand Awards and the 2018 NZ Wood-Resene Timber Design Awards.

    Te Pā Tauira, which was officially blessed earlier this year by Kai Tahu representative Tahu Potiki, opened its doors to students in February.

    The name Te Pā Tauira was gifted by Ōtākou Rūnaka in 2017, along with each of the names for the five floors – Hawea, Rapuwai, Waitaha, Māmoe and Tahu (the southern tribes who have migrated to the South Island over centuries).

    Read more about Te Pā Tauira

  • Advice about Meningococcal disease (May 25 2018)

    Following confirmation a University of Otago student contracted meningococcal disease and was hospitalised in a serious condition the weekend of 19-20 May, Public Health South has issued the following information in an effort to safeguard others:

    “While the risk of developing infection is very low, it is important to seek medical advice immediately if you develop any of the symptoms of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease can be difficult to diagnose because it can look like other illnesses, such as the flu.”

    Symptoms of meningitis can develop suddenly and include:

    • a high fever
    • headache
    • sleepiness
    • joint and muscle pains.

    There can also be some more specific symptoms, such as:

    • a stiff neck
    • dislike of bright lights
    • vomiting
    • crying
    • refusal to feed (in infants)
    • a rash consisting of reddish-purple pin-prick spots or bruises.

    Even if you’ve had a meningococcal vaccine you still need to look out for symptoms, because the vaccines don’t protect against all meningococcal strains.

    Please contact the Public Health Unit if you have any further questions.

    If you are unwell, do not wait to call the Public Health Unit — it is important to see a doctor immediately.

    Meningococcal infection is caused by a bacterium that is carried, usually harmlessly, in the nose and throat by up to 15% of people. However, occasionally carriers may pass it onto others who have been in close contact with them.

    Only a very small number of people in contact with “carriers” develop meningococcal disease. If this does happen, it may take up to ten days for symptoms to develop.

    The bacteria are difficult to spread and are only passed from person to person by regular close, prolonged contact. Contact with saliva from the front of the mouth, teeth or lips rarely passes the bacteria on.

    Only people who have been in close contact with a suspected or confirmed case need to take special antibiotics to clear the bacteria from the back of the throat.

    These include people who have stayed overnight in the dwelling in the seven days* before the person became unwell, intimate contacts such as boyfriend/girlfriend/sexual partner, and healthcare workers exposed to respiratory secretions during procedures.  This “clearance” antibiotic does not treat the disease in a person who is already developing the infection.

    *The university student, from Studholme College, was hospitalised the week before 22-23 May.

    For further Information, visit

  • Call for Papers: Scope - Professional Practice (May 25 2018)

    Scope: Learning and Teaching is a peer-reviewed publication of Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini ki Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. This year there will be a special issue under the auspices of Capable NZ with the theme of Professional Practice. This issue will focus on contemporary research in the post-discipline field of work-based learning and professional practice. It is concerned with views and critical debates surrounding issues of practice, theory, history and their relationships as manifested through the experiences of researchers and practitioners in work based learning and professional practice. The focus of the inaugural issue will be transformation, and contributors will be encouraged to explore the boundaries of the changes taking place both in the development of professional frameworks of practice and in this dynamic environment.

    The deadline for submissions is 29 June 2018. The journal is peer reviewed, and each contribution is blind reviewed by 3 people.  Contributions may be quite brief – two to three pages – or longer articles. 

    Original contributions of significance
    Scope: Professional Practice will publish significant original contributions in its chosen field. This form is for reviewers of these contributions.

    Case studies
    The journal will publish Capable NZ graduate’s case studies, co-authored by graduates and their academic mentors or facilitators, summarising the learner’s professional transformation, and the scope, scale and topic of their professional practice.

    Learner profiles
    The journal will publish Capable NZ’s learner profiles, short-format summaries of individual learners compiled by staff writers from learner’s assessment submissions.

    The journal will also be a publication of record, annually listing graduates, staff profiles, and significant activities. This section will be subject to internal review.

    Who should I speak with if I have a question?

    Please have a look at the author guidelines which can be downloaded here.

    Please contact one of the co-editors – Jo Kirkwood or Malcolm Macpherson.

     

  • Gala event to support Otago Community Hospice (May 23 2018)

    Co-hosted by Otago Polytechnic, Otago Community Hospice's annual gala event, “A Night Under the Stars”, promises a night of laughter, music, food and fun on 9 June.

    Actor Mark Hadlow will discuss his life on the stage, television and big screen, and will team up with MC Harriet Moir for a duet from a well-known musical. The Little Cabaret Band, featuring Greg McLeod, who recently starred as Mitzi in the stage show "Priscilla: Queen of the Desert", will also perform.

    The event, to be held at the Hub, is a key component of Otago Community Hospice’s annual fundraising campaign.

    A teaching facility with a strong relationship with Otago Polytechnic, Otago Community Hospice provides community-based specialist palliative care and support to people who are dying, where their needs are beyond the level able to be provided by primary palliative care providers alone (such as a GP or District Nurse). All of its services are provided free of charge.

    To book, visit Eventfinda.

     

  • Blessing for Central Campus (May 22 2018)

    The first stage of site works for the new Central Campus development at the Bannockburn Road site, was blessed in the weekend.  Francie Diver of Alexandra performed the blessing, and was joined by members of the local Maori community as well as Central campus staff.

  • Molyneux Restaurant Dates (May 21 2018)

    2018 Molyneux Restaurant Dates

    Call 0800 765 9276 - Bookings essential

    Restaurant Theme  Date
    German beer hall  25 July
    Greek  1 August
    Wild foods  8 August
    Spanish  15 August
    Italian  22 August
    Japanese  29 August
  • A date to remember (May 21 2018)

    Enabling Love, a dating website run for people with disabilities by people living with disability, is hosting “Social Series #1” on 27 May at Reading Cinema and Dog with Two Tails in Dunedin.

    “The event is designed to ensure that everyone has a good time,” explains Josh Perry, an Otago Polytechnic business and marketing graduate, who launched the dating website earlier this year.

    “We aim to break down some of the barriers that some people face when it comes to socialising and building relationships. We encourage people to come along and form new relationships and new connections.

    “We encourage tertiary students and young professionals, as well as disabled people.

    “The plan on the night is to meet at 7pm at Reading Cinema and the movie will start shortly afterwards. We will then head down to Dog with Two Tails after the movie has finished for drinks and to enable people to get to know each other.”

    Josh says tickets are limited. “So make sure you book yourselves in for this special event!”

    There will be three types of tickets, ranging from $14 to $35.

    Tickets are available from Eventfinda or www.enablinglove.nz

     

     

  • Examining innovation at Global Forum (May 21 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic learner Dylan Malcolm is relishing the opportunity to soak up others’ ideas and energy at the Global Forum on Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Humber, Toronto.

    The third-year Bachelor of Culinary Arts learner left for Canada at the weekend, along with third-year Bachelor of Design (Communication) student Kennedy Barnes.

    The pair will be involved in a workshop, “Social Enterprise through Design Thinking”,whichbrings together students from around the world to identify, define, prototype and test a solution to a critical challenge common to communities across the globe.

    As a partner institution with Humber, one of Canada's leading postsecondary institutions, Otago Polytechnic was invited to select two students who are passionate about social entrepreneurship and innovation and show commitment to community development.

    “We are working on an idea around better cultural integration of ideas, creating an environment that is seen as ‘safe’, a place where ideas can be shared without any risk of offence,” Dylan explains.

    “It’s a great opportunity. I’ve never left New Zealand, so it will certainly be an experience. Meeting like-minded people will be amazing.

    “I’m staying an extra week to soak up as much as I can. When we come back, we will present our findings.”

    Although most of his expenses have been met by Humber, Dylan has been raising some spending money by selling seafood-based lunches through Otago Polytechnic’s food truck.

    Accompanying Dylan and Kennedy to Humber is Dr Caroline McCaw, Academic Leader Communication Design. (Philippa Keaney, Learning and Teaching Development, will be participating via Skype, along with Ron Bull, Tumuaki Whakaako Otago Polytechnic).

    Caroline will facilitate a workshop titled “Sharing learning, embedding social literacy and evaluating knowledge co-production”.

    She will present examples of Otago Polytechnic’s approach to project-based learning, applied research, and increasing social literacy as informal learner outcomes.

    “Workshop attendees will first consider a range of learner capabilities associated with these approaches to teaching and learning, such as developing social literacy, learning to work collaboratively, and adapting to difference and change,” Caroline explains.

    “We will take this reflection to consider the questions: How can local initiatives be shared across institutions and countries, and involve learners, teachers and local communities as collaborators in a networked learning conversation? And we will consider who benefits— and how do we evaluate and share these benefits?”

    Philippa will present a workshop titled, “A framework for developing work-readiness: transferable skills in diverse contexts”.

    “In this workshop, we expand on the concept of capabilities as human-centred attributes that are considered sought-after by employers,” Philippa explains.

    “Otago Polytechnic’s Learner Capability Framework has been developed through industry research, and identifies 24 core capabilities. Taking this model as an example, we seek to identify the strengths and limitations of an employer-driven approach to capabilities.”

    Philippa and Caroline will then collaborate in a third workshop with Ron Bull, a practical take on the issues identified in the two other workshops.

    TitledLet's do it! Learning through doing: where our paths converge”, it will utilise a hands-on approach to explore the spaces and connectivity between learning, skills, social and cultural literacies through team-based activities. It also introduces “ako”, a Māori concept that describes a teaching and learning relationship, where the educator is also learning from the student and new knowledge and understandings can grow out of shared learning experiences.

    Read about our international partnerships

     

  • Public Seminar: The Art of the Critic (May 21 2018)

    24 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    The Art of the Critic

    Ed Hanfling, Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar provides a critic's perspective on a range of issues associated with the discipline of art criticism, including the relationship between criticism and relativism, the functions of implicit and explicit judgements and the basis for various evaluative criteria, particularly the criterion of "surprise".

    Ed Hanfling is an art historian, critic and curator and lecturer in art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art.  He has reviewed Auckland exhibitions for the quarterly journal Art New Zealand since 2004.

  • TEXpo shines light on apps that aim to help others (May 17 2018)

    The inspiration behind a range of innovative health-related endeavours by Otago Polytechnic learners will be discussed at TEXpo next Saturday, 26 May.

    Just one of the highlights of Dunedin Techweek, which launches on 18 May, TEXpo is a day-long event showcasing and demystifying tech for all ages.

    The expo includes talks, demonstrations, open days, displays, film screenings and workshops, bringing together Otago Polytechnic staff and learners, the University of Otago as well as a range of local industries.

    These include a prototype app developed by Otago Polytechnic students that aims to help adolescents and young adults who are living with cancer.

    The “AYA Rangatahi Uruwhenua Passport” app includes personal health information, cancer diagnosis, treatment information, follow-up guidelines, information about potential late effects of treatment (for example, the risk of depression), tips for healthy living, and contact details for treatment team members and the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service.

    The Southern District Health Board (DHB) approached Otago Polytechnic for help to develop an app to meet a need identified by adolescents and young adults (AYA) living with cancer — to have mobile access to their treatment information, aiding their transition to life outside hospital.

    In the first half of 2017 a team of Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design (Communication) students created initial screen designs. Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information Technology students then used those designs to build an Android app.

    Currently a working prototype, the AYA Rangatahi Uruwhenua passport app has yet to be developed to its full capacity. Final stages of development would include adding password protection.

    "Our students have great experiences working on projects that benefit our local communities by prototyping innovative solutions to design problem opportunities,” Martin Kean, Senior Lecturer, College of Art, Design and Architecture, says.

    “But it's more than that — they get to see what it's like to be making a living as a designer."

    Elsewhere, several students in Otago Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Information Technology programme have been developing software aimed at helping people who are unable to control computers through traditional devices such as a mouse or the keyboard.

    Led by David Rozado, Senior Lecturer in Otago Polytechnic’s College of Enterprise and Development, the learners’ solutions involve open-source software that recognises facial gestures, voice prompts and eye movement.  

    Examples of the applications created by Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information technology students include:

    a “Gaze Control Toolbar” that allows the users to fully control a Windows computer using only their eyes;

    an “Icon-based Communicator” enabling motor-impaired users who cannot read or write to communicate with their eyes;

    “FaceSwitch”, an application that transforms predefined facial gestures to specific keyboard keystrokes.

    The software is available through an online repository (https://accessibilitysoftwarehub.github.io).

    “The Otago Polytechnic accessibility software hub is an attempt at providing users in need with access to accessibility software regardless of their financial circumstances,” David says.

    About TEXpo:

    A free, collaborative, cross-campus showcase of innovative tech research, products and industries, TEXpo will be held across two sites — the Otago Polytechnic Hub and the Otago University Business School — on Saturday 26 May.

    There will be loads of interesting tech on display, as well as things to get your hands on, including electric vehicles drives.

    Otago Polytechnic Hub’s will host displays from local companies AbacusBio, Scott Technology, Department of Conservation, Hatch Education, Firebrand, Blue Penguins Pukekura, REZO Water and Energy, Igtimi, Malcam Foundation, Blueskin Energy Network, design build listen, Runaway Play, Pickapark, Tracmap and Select Recruitment along with displays and talks from our experts in Occupational Therapy, Information Technology, Nursing, Communication Design, Engineering Technology, Sport, Automotive, and EPICentre.

    Bring your friends and family to this free event.

    Read more about Techweek

  • Public Talk: Ben Carter - FIRED UP (May 16 2018)

    WED 16 MAY, 5.30PM, P152 LECTURE ROOM, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, REIGO ST, (OFF ALBANY ST)

    Ben Carter is a studio potter, workshop leader, and social media enthusiast based in Santa Cruz, CA. He received his BFA in ceramics/painting from Appalachian State University, and his MFA in ceramics from the University of Florida. His professional experience includes being an artist-in-residence at the Odyssey Center for Ceramic Art in Asheville, NC, as well as Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, CO, the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, MT, and the Ceramic Research Center Guldagergaard in Skelskor, Denmark.

    From 2010-2012 he served as the Education Director of the Pottery Workshop in Shanghai, China. He has lectured and presented workshops at universities and craft centers in the United States, Canada, China, Australia, and New Zealand. He has exhibited internationally in numerous invitational and juried shows.  Carter was recently named the 2016 Ceramic Artist of the Year for Ceramics Monthly and Pottery Making Illustrated

     

  • Welcome to Artist in Residence: Richard Stratton (May 16 2018)

    Dunedin School of Art welcomes Artist in Residence Richard Stratton to Dunedin this week.

    Born in Dunedin New Zealand in 1970, Richard Stratton (winner of the 2017 Portage Premier prize in ceramics) attended the Dunedin School of Art graduating in 1993. Shifting to Wellington Richard began working as a tutor and developing his technique in ceramics. Richard’s ceramics have always responded to industrially produced press moulded and heavily ornate 18th century ceramics. Historical form and technique are critical to his works imaginative generation and meaning. His work has been exhibited widely in New Zealand and overseas and is included in private and public collections notably Te Papa Tongarewa, The Dowse Art Museum and the Real Art Road show.

     

  • Workshop with Award winning Ceramicist Richard Stratton - Bookings Essential (May 16 2018)

    19-20 MAY and 26-27 May, Dunedin School of Art Ceramics Department, Anzac Avenue, Dunedin

    Workshop: 2 Weekends with Richard Stratton, “Slip and its Pattern Evolution”
    BOOKINGS ARE ESSENTIAL

    In this hands-on workshop Richard will cover the historical techniques of slip decoration in practical demonstrations, covering tools and materials, slip making, and application to forms.

    For students of the School of Art, bookings are through the school.
    For non-students, bookings are through the Otago Potters Group.
    Please email otagopottersgroup@gmail.com for more details

     

  • What do you think? Is Innovation Good for the World? (May 16 2018)

    Come along to the Techweek launch event at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery this Friday, 18 May (at 5.45pm) and enjoy thought-provoking and inspiring panel discussions on the Techweek theme “Is Innovation Good for the World?”

    With a panel of highly respected and entertaining professionals covering education, law, sustainability, medicine, culture and innovation, this event will serve to highlight the pros and cons of innovation, and ignite discussion on what we need to do as a city, and as a country to best utilise emerging technologies.

    Tickets include a drink and canapés and the opportunity to network.

    Space is limited so book your ticket now:

    https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/is-innovation-good-for-the-world-prelude-to-dunedin-techweek18-panel-discussion-tickets-44359175488

     

     

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Teaching & Learning) - Capability (May 15 2018)

    Scope Contemporary Research Topics is an open access, peer reviewed journal published annually by Otago Polytechnic. Scope (Learning and Teaching) is concerned with views, critical debate and reflections on learning and teaching theory and practice. We seek to address current topical matters in the field of tertiary education. Our focus is on building a sense of community amongst researchers from an array of New Zealand institutions with the goal of linking with a wider international community. This 2018 issue will focus on the theme of Capability: people, practice and frameworks.

    Submissions for Scope (Learning and Teaching) - Capability are invited from those involved in any aspect of teaching and learning. Submissions should be sent in electronic format for review and potential inclusion to the Editors Oonagh McGirr and David McMaster by email to Su Bolland, Portfolio Assistant by 30 June 2018.

    Submissions should contribute to critical debate and reflect new understandings concerning capability of people, practice and/or frameworks within the context of learning and teaching. High standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to consistency through the Chicago referencing style are expected. For general submission guidelines, see below.

    Formats include: editorials; articles; essays; logs and travel reports; book and educational software reviews; residencies; publications; interviews and round-tables; and reflective pieces. Other suggested formats will also be considered; and special topics comprising submissions by various contributors may be tendered to the editors.

    General submission guidelines

    • Send a digital Word document to Su Bolland by 30 June 2018.
    • Cover sheet (a separate cover page) to include: Name of author(s); contact email; contact telephone number; postal address; word count; number of images included in text.
    • Author’s biography: Include a short biography of no more than 50 words of each author with your submission, briefly outlining their professional background and experience.

    Detailed submission guidelines

    Text

    • Submit only Word document files which are clearly named, e.g. “smith.doc”.
    • Word limit:
      • Feature articles and essays: 2500-4000 words
      • Logs and travel reports; residencies; publications; interviews and round-tables; and reflective pieces: 1500-2000 words
      • Book and educational software reviews: 200-700 words
    • Single line spacing:  between paragraphs; with no hard returns between lines of text in a paragraph; between full stop and first word of next sentence.
    • Please do not apply indentations, tabulations or any such formatting to text.
    • Captions for images should be numbered, should be complete, and should adhere to a sequence of information. See examples in previous issues online.
    • Referencing should be in the form of endnotes with superscripted Arabic numerals in text and following the Chicago Style Manual.
    • As no extra reference list is required, please include all bibliographical details in the endnotes.
    • Include low resolution images (maximum 72dpi) embedded in your word document where you would ideally prefer to have them placed and supply full captions underneath them.
    • Please remove all identifiers such as authors’ names and identifying meta-data (such as “file created by.....” data). This is to facilitate blind reviewing of the submission.
    • The submission should be cleaned off all
    • All abbreviations must be spelled out upon first mention in both the summary and main text, followed by the abbreviated form in parentheses. Thereafter, you may use the abbreviated form.
    • All funding sources should be credited in the Acknowledgments section. In addition, people who contributed to the work but who do not fit the criteria for authors should be listed along with their contributions.

    Images

    • Format:  Images must be supplied as jpeg (minimum size 2MB) or TIFF or eps formats.
    • Colour:   Greyscale or CMYK
    • Quality:  300dpi - maximum image print area is 140mm wide x 190 deep.
    • Orientation: Ensure your image is oriented correctly.
    • Labelling: Label all image files with your name and number the images in the order they appear in your text and caption document, e.g. “smith.1.tif”, “smith.2.tif”.
  • Exhibition: Victoria Stevens at Central Stories Museum (May 14 2018)

    12 MAY - 1 JULY, CENTRAL STORIES MUSEUM & ART GALLERY, 21 CENTENNIAL AVE, ALEXANDRA, CENTRAL OTAGO

    Stevens, completed her  degree at the Dunedin School of Art last year and exhibited "Ninety" in Dunedin during her final year of study. She viewed the garments she created as canvases, and "little stories in themselves". The exhibition was "multi-layered", also honouring the "women’s work" that received so little recognition at the time and even now, the skill and nobility of creating and recycling clothes out of old garments, the mending of those that had become worn. Victoria used a variety of techniques for the garments in "Ninety", including Shibori, immersion and hand dyeing, solar printing, applique, and various stitch and embroidery methods.

    "Ninety", by Victoria Stevens is on at Central Stories Museum and Art Gallery, in Alexandra.

    Read more about Victoria Steven's in an interview with the Otago Daily Times.

    See more of Victoria's work.

     

  • Public Seminar: Drawn to Sound (May 14 2018)

    17 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Hannah Joynt and Jane Venis, School and Design and Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    Drawn to Sound 

    Drawn to Sound is a performance project in which we address the question “How do we collaborate successfully with two very different creative practices in order to explore new territories within a contemporary context?” In Drawn to Sound we are able to remain based in our separate disciplines yet generate new work collaboratively. Inevitably this pushes our individual practices to otherwise uncharted territory and lead us to deeper understandings of our own and each other’s work.

    Our seminar is in the form of a collaborative performance live in the DSA gallery. Jane will play a range of instruments – including handmade works – in an improvisational way and Hannah responds to the music interpreting the sound as a large scale drawing.

    Hannah Joynt is a contemporary drawing practitioner who works in a range of media, processes and scales. Jane Venis a musician, installation artist and maker of sculptural musical instruments

  • Passion aplenty at 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards (May 11 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards recognise a plethora of passionate people.

    The nominees comprises 16 people, from Commonwealth Games stars to artists with international reputations, from business high-fliers to community movers and shakers.

    They include internationally acclaimed ceramics maestro Chris Weaver, fast-rising painter Holly Zandbergen, inspirational fashion designer Abby van Schreven, award-winning nursing specialist Marianne Te Tau, visionary McDonald’s franchise owner Justin Stonelake, Women’s Refuge support worker Kerri Oliver and youth advocate Faanimo Elisara-To’o.

    The sports world is well-represented, too.

    New Zealand sporting stars Kelly Brazier (Rugby Sevens) and Holly Robinson have been nominated, as have Dunedin-based athletics coach Raylene Bates and New Zealand rugby sevens legend DJ Forbes.

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards will be held at Manaaki tonight, 11 May.

  • Lending helping hand at Trenz conference (May 11 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic learners have jumped into the busy world of tourism this week, helping organisers of the week-long Trenz conference at Dunedin’s Edgar Centre.

    Prominent in their green shirts at the annual national tourism industry showcase, they have performed a range of duties, from helping register delegates to marshalling lunch queues.

    In addition, Otago Polytechnic learners Jessica Hatfield, Victoria Watson and Bahandi Sueno have been “shadowing” the Tourism Industry Association (TIA) event organisers for the entire event, gaining valuable insights into event organisation.

    TIA events and marketing director Trina Edwards says using students benefited the small organising team as well as the students, who got to see the industry in action.

    Read more

     

  • Impasto, winning style for artist (May 10 2018)

    Holly Zandbergen’s works depict everyday moments, portraits and landscapes and explore a relationship between density of mark and the feeling of open space. Holly has sold art works in London and New York galleries, and won international awards, gaining considerable recognition in the United Kingdom, particularly for such a young artist, when she was the recipient of the Prudential Best Young Artists Award in the National Open Art Competition at the Royal College of Art. 

    Holly graduated from the Dunedin School of Art in 2013. Holly says she chose to study at the Dunedin School of Art because of its emphasis on the practical side of art making. She says, “The course gave me the opportunity to create in a space that was never dictated by current modes or ways of thinking. The lecturers always maintained an openness in their way of teaching which I found extremely refreshing after studying at a previous university that believed painting to be a dying art form. In this encouraging environment I felt more comfortable to find my voice as a painter, and with my teacher's guidance I grew in confidence most noticeably in my paint handling."

    She talks about her painting style in this video.

    Read more about Holly's career...

     

    (Image "Impermanence" by Holly Zanderbergen from SITE Exhibition, 2013)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Technologies) (May 10 2018)

    We are adding a new topic, Technologies, to the suite of issues of our Scope: Contemporary Research Topics journal. Scope (Technologies) is a journal that provides insights into technologies for change. This research platform aims to engage discussion on Technologies as an agency for change in the field of Architecture, Design and Engineering. Foci range from theoretical frameworks to applied solutions that impact on the everyday in relation to people, time and place. Expressions of interest with title and abstract are being sought now, for publication in 2019.

    All the accepted papers will be published in this peer reviewed journal that will be not only be in print, but an online version of the journal will also be available free online here. Scope journals are historically catalogued on the EBSCO Database in recognition of academic quality and alignment with international peer review processes. Best submission will be recognized and eligible for a travelling scholarship in acknowledgement of the contribution to the field of technological research and discourse.

    Paper categories:

    • Full paper (8-10 pages)
    • Short paper (5-6 pages)
    • Poster paper (2-3 pages)

    Please refer to the submission guidelines before submitting your papers and download the latest version of the Paper-Template file from www.thescopes.org in preparing your manuscript. The journal practices double-blind review, i.e., the authors of the submitting papers will not know who their referees are, and the referees will not be aware of the authors of the papers that they are reviewing. Anonymization is not required in the submitted manuscripts.

    Submissions should be sent in hardcopy and electronic format for review and potential inclusion to editors Tobias Danielmeier and Matt King at Otago Polytechnic/Te Kura Matatini Ki Otago, Private Bag 1910, Dunedin, New Zealand. Please consult the information for contributors below and hardcopy or online versions for examples. Peer review forms will be sent to all submitters in due course, with details concerning the possible reworking of documents where relevant. All submitters will be allowed up to two subsequent resubmissions of documents for peer approval. All final decisions concerning publication of submissions will reside with the Editors. Opinions published are those of the authors and not necessarily subscribed to by the Editors or Otago Polytechnic.

    Formats include: editorials; articles; perspectives; essays; system designs, patents; and applied projects; Other suggested formats will also be considered; and special topics comprising submissions by various contributors may be tendered to the editors. All material will be published both in hardcopy and online. Submissions should engage with applications of recent technological developments and innovations. High standards of writing, proofreading and adherence to consistency through the Chicago referencing style are expected. For more information, please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style; and consult prior issues for examples. 

    Submissions should include a cover sheet containing a short biography of no more than 50 words, as well as title, details concerning institutional position and affiliation (where relevant); and contact information (postal, email and telephone number). All such identifying information should be withheld from the body of the submission. Low resolution images with full captions should be inserted into texts to indicate where they would be preferred; while high resolution images should be sent separately. 


  • Call for Papers: Scope (Teaching and Learning) - Sustainable Practice (May 09 2018)

    Scope: Contemporary Research Topics: Learning and Teaching (Sustainable Practice) aims to engage discussion on contemporary research in the field of sustainable practice (including resilience, sustainability science etc). It is concerned with views and critical debates surrounding issues of practice, theory, history and their relationships as manifested through the experiences of researchers and practitioners in sustainable practice. The focus of this issue will be “Transformation”. Contributors are be encouraged to explore positive actions in the challenge of the required restorative socio-ecological transformation. The Call for Papers closes on 29th June 2018.

    What qualifies as a transformation?

    We are looking for transformations that are seriously creative: they should be novel, perhaps even surprising, but also well-thought out and credible.

    We prefer transformations that impact whole-systems. What do we mean by that? A system can be a community, a corporation, a government, or even the entire global environment. If you want to transform something, you need to look at these systems in their entirety and at several, nested scales, from local to global. Rather than focusing on a single link, look at the whole chain. When you start looking at the world this way, it becomes clear: everything is connected.

    What are examples?

    A transformation can be local, such as the development of a sustainable eco-village or eco-city. Or it can be grand and global, like the development of an atmospheric trust to cap and trade greenhouse gases.

    It doesn’t have to solve all problems, but it should recognize what problems it can solve, and what others it might cause. Solutions should address the institutional and cultural changes that may be required. We welcome concrete goals, but we won’t shy away from efforts to think outside the system or transcend a paradigm.

    How can I contribute?

    There are several different ways you can contribute: 

    • Sustainable Practice- Feature Articles (2500-4000 words)
    • Transformations- Opinion piece or personal essay (1250-2500 words)
    • Making a Difference- Reportage on a successful solution being implemented at a specific location (1500-2500 words)
    • Sustainable Practice in History- An examination, exploration or study of a sustainablity issues within a historical context (1500-2500 words)
    • Envision- A description of what a future might look like (1500-2500 words)
    • Reviews- A book or other media review (200-300 words)
    • Photographs and Other Visuals- An illustration of Transformation in photographs, charts, illustrations, or other art.

    What if I have a question?

    Please have a look at the author guidelines which can be downloaded here.

    Please contact Ray O'Brien.

    How should I submit my contribution?

    You can upload your contribution directly via this link. Please remember to take all if the identifying data off of the submission so that it can be blind peer reviewed. 

     

  • Public Seminar: CLINKProject: Collaboration – Intervention – Exhibition (May 08 2018)

    10 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    Johanna Zellmer & Andrew Last, Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    CLINKProject: Collaboration – Intervention – Exhibition CLINK4

    This presentation will report on the collaborative jewellery initiative established in 2014 jointly by Hungry Creek Art & Craft School in Auckland and the Dunedin School of Art (Otago Polytechnic). Every year the two schools join forces to form a collective of undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff for a collaborative event known as CLINKProject, all working collaboratively towards one outcome and a conclusive publication. The projects play with the experience of disruption or intervention, often in the form of unannounced pop-up exhibitions in central Auckland, such as jewellery making on the street or deploying clear plastic umbrellas as moving showcases. Each year’s collective gathers for a frenzied week of brainstorming, planning, collaborative making and public interaction, in an endeavour to share contemporary jewellery with a diverse audience. The first two projects unfolded at the Auckland Inner Link Bus stops (2014) and the courtyards of public institutions such as the Auckland Art Gallery & and City Library (2015). Projects #3 and #4 were working with the challenge of how to enact these driving forces within the context of the public gallery settings of Te Uru Waitekere Contemporary Gallery (2016) and the Auckland Museum in 2017.

    Johanna Zellmer completed a masters degree at the Australian National University Canberra School of Art and a formal apprenticeship as a Goldsmith in Germany. As Studio Coordinator in Jewellery & Metalsmithing she also manages the Artist-in-Residence programme at the Dunedin School of Art. Johanna’s research explores the possibilities of jewellery as a medium of socio-political knowledge.

    Andrew Last is from Melbourne but has lived in Dunedin since 2001. He is a jewellery lecturer in the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic, the job that brought him to Aotearoa. Andrew’s art education was at RMIT’s Gold & Silversmithing department and he lectured at Charles Sturt Uni in Wagga for ten years prior to crossing the Tasman. Andrew is a maker of jewellery, sculpture, houses, boats, bikes, bass guitars, bits and bobs. Much of this work goes to friends, family and community, often in a gift economy, occasionally by commission. His recent work is characterised by the relationships between people, place and materials.

  • Sports stars line up for Distinguished Alumni Awards (May 03 2018)

    New Zealand sporting stars Kelly Brazier and Holly Robinson have a few things in common.

    Both shone at the recent Commonwealth Games, Kelly grabbing gold in the Women’s Rugby Sevens, and Holly claiming silver in the F46 javelin.

    Both studied Sports and Exercise-related programmes at Otago Polytechnic.

    And both have been nominated for Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards, which also feature a couple of other highly accomplished sportspeople — Dunedin-based athletics coach Raylene Bates and New Zealand rugby sevens legend DJ Forbes.

    Kelly was the hero in the New Zealand women's sevens team’s Commonwealth Games gold medal match, running 80 metres to score the winning try in extra time.

    However, the fact she promptly turned attention to the defensive efforts of her team-mates speaks volumes about her selfless attitude.

    Having played representative touch in summer and representative rugby in winter for much of her teens, Kelly was selected in the Otago NPC team in 2006 — at the age of 15.

    At that stage, she’d already played a season for Alhambra Union’s premier women’s rugby team, for whom she set a New Zealand women’s club rugby record of 64 points in a game in 2009.

    She made her first New Zealand team (the under-21 mixed touch side) when she was 14, and was selected for the New Zealand secondary schoolgirl’s touch team at 15, followed by  stint in the under-21 teams at 18 and 19.

    After leaving Otago Girls High School, Kelly enrolled at Otago Polytechnic, where she gained a Certificate in High Performance in 2006, then a Diploma in Applied Sport and Exercise Leadership (Sports Management and Coaching) in 2010.

    The leading points scorer at the 2010 Rugby World Cup, Kelly won the Otago Institute of Sport and Adventure Sportsperson of the Year award in 2009 and 2010.

    Like Kelly, Holly has always been “sporty”. Her earliest memory is playing rugby with her twin brother in Hokitika when she was three years old.

    Fast-forward two decades: the Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Applied Science graduate stepped on to the Commonwealth Games medal dais after winning silver in the F46 javelin on the Gold Coast in early April.

    Holly threw 43.32m with her first of six throws, breaking Hollie Arnold's (Wales) world record by 30cm. However, Arnold snatched gold (and the record) from Robinson with a final throw of 44.43m.

    Robinson, who was born with a shortened left arm, “decided to start getting serious about something” at the age of 12. She focused on javelin throwing and, at 16, was offered a scholarship to train with Raylene Bates.

    In 2012 she represented New Zealand at the London Paralympics. It was also Holly’s last year of school.

    “I looked at the Bachelor of Applied Science (Physical Activity, Health and Wellness) degree at Otago Polytechnic.  It was a practical and applied qualification, and I liked that. It’s sort of the way I learn.”

    Raylene Bates has also been nominated for an Otago Polytechnic Distinguished Alumni Award. She completed a Bachelor of Applied Management (Transformation and Change and Sports Management, 2011).

    Employed fulltime by Athletics New Zealand, Raylene was named a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for her service to athletics in the 2017 New Year Honours. She also won the Shining Light Award at the Attitude Awards last year, in recognition of her involvement with Paralympians and the work she does to enhance the lives of people with disabilities.

    Likewise, DJ Forbes is in line for an Otago Polytechnic Distinguished Alumni Award.

    DJ retired from playing last year, having contested his 11th World Rugby Sevens series, bringing to an end a career that included 153 tries in world series events, a Commonwealth Games gold medal (2010) and a World Cup title (2013).

    Otago Polytechnic’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Awards will be held at Manaaki, Harbour Tce, Dunedin, on 11 May.

    Read more about our Sport and Exercise programmes

     

     

  • Examples of excellence (May 02 2018)

    Representatives from high-performing US construction company Jaynes Corporation are visiting Otago Polytechnic, bringing with them their performance excellence model.

    Utilising the US Department of Commerce's Baldrige Performance Excellence (PE) Framework, the Albuquerque-based company has grown year on year while continuing to achieve outstanding business results. A standout feature of Jaynes is their alignment and commonality of purpose across the whole organisation.

    An Otago Polytechnic contingent including Jo Brady, Oonagh McGirr and Brayden Murray visited Jaynes Corporation on their PESA study trip last year. As a result, Jaynes Corporation's Sam Hatchell and Teryn Lamoreux were invited to Dunedin, where they are delivering a performance excellence presentation to staff today.

     

  • Relevant Research - April issue available (May 02 2018)

    The April issue of our monthly research e-magazine is now available. In this issue you can read about:

    View the full publication here.

  • Postgraduate Student Travel Award 2018 (May 01 2018)

    Sunday 6 May is the deadline for travel scholarship applications for Otago/Southland based postgraduate students.

    Application Guidelines

    The Otago Institute for the Arts and Sciences is pleased to offer travel scholarships to assist Otago/Southland-based researchers to travel as part of their postgraduate study. The winner will receive $1000 for the purpose of conference attendance and/or other research-related travel. We received many strong applications for these awards in 2017 and applicants who were unsuccessful last year are encouraged to apply again.

    Applicants must:

    • be a member of the Otago Institute for the Arts and Sciences. (Alternatively, a supervisor can sponsor a student for $50, which makes both supervisor and student full members.)
    • be a postgraduate student and be based in Otago or Southland.
    • be travelling to a conference or visiting a collaborating researcher.
    • be presenting original research in oral or poster format if travelling to a conference.

    Documentation required

    There is no application form for the award. To apply,  combine the following documents into a single pdf in the order listed here. Send your complete application as one pdf via email attachment to the address below:

    1.     A curriculum vitae (at most two pages in length), including a brief statement (one or two sentences) of your area of research.

    2.     A description (at most two hundred words in length) of the nature and significance your research.

    3.     An explanation (at most two hundred words in length) of how and why the proposed travel would be of value to you. Please include the conference you will attend or the research group you will visit, along with location and dates of travel.

    4.     If attending a conference, the title and abstract of the research you will present, an indication of whether it will be an oral or a poster presentation, and an indication of whether it has been accepted. If visiting a collaborator's research group, provide evidence of invitation or other communication demonstrating the planning of the visit.

    Nature of assessment

    Award assessment proceeds in two rounds:

    • Round One – applications will be judged by three members of the Otago Institute for the Arts and Sciences. Applicants will be assessed for their ability to clearly communicate: (1) the nature and significance of their research and (2) the value of the proposed travel. Four finalists will be chosen, with applicants notified of the outcome of this round 24 May 2018.
    • Round Two – The four finalists will give oral presentations, starting at 12:00 on 8 June 2018 in the Barclay Lecture Theatre at the Otago Museum. Oral presentations will be ten minutes each, followed by a three-minute question period. Presenters will be judged for enthusiasm and the ability to communicate clearly about their research. The winner of the $1000 Travel Award will be announced immediately after the presentations. The other three finalists will each receive a $150 gift voucher.

    Further commitments

    Upon completion of travel the successful applicants will be required to provide a short report for publication on the Otago Institute's website (http://otagoinstitute.otago.ac.nz/).

    Deadline

    Applications are due before midnight on Sunday, 6 May 2018. Email your application as one single pdf attachment with the subject line "submission: Otago Institute 2018 postgraduate student travel award" to:

    Andrea Liberatore
    andrea.liberatore@otago.ac.nz

    Key dates

    • application deadline: midnight, 6 May 2018
    • notification of finalists: 24 May 2018
    • oral presentations by finalists: noon, 8 June 2018

    Further information

    http://otagoinstitute.otago.ac.nz/ ​​ 

  • Felting Workshops - Family Friendly (Apr 30 2018)

    SATURDAY 19 MAY and SATURDAY 26 MAY, SOUTH DUNEDIN COMMUNITY

    Presented by artists Alicia Hall and Viv Dwyer, these workshops introduce you to the wonderful world of felting, and the opportunity to make beautifully-coloured tiny worlds and little landscapes.

    Bring the family and help us create a fabulous art installation for our new community pop-up library in South Dunedin.


    FREE
    Geode worlds: Saturday 19 May, 10.30am
    Tiny landscapes: Saturday 26 May, 10.30am


    South Dunedin Community Pop-up Library
    199 Hillside Road, South Dunedin

  • Exhibition and Community Workshop: "Anatomy Lessons" by Michelle Beevors (Apr 30 2018)

    2 - 19 MAY, 11 DON STREET, INVERCARGILL

    Anatomy Lessons 2005-2018
    Michele Beevors

    It’s knitting, but not as you’ve seen it before…..

    Created by Dunedin artist Michele Beevors over the last 13 years, 'Anatomy Lessons 2005 - 2018' features life-sized hand knitted skeletons, unimaginable in their detail. Whilst many of us are bound to relate hand knitted wool items with something a loved one might have made for us, this show causes these feelings of comfort to be replaced by the unease of combining wool with a skeletal form.

    This thought provoking show reflects the fragility of loss and refers to the idea that our ‘biology is our destiny’. It begs the question, what will be left after the next big extinction? 

    'Anatomy Lessons 2005 - 2018' opens to the public on the 1st May at 6pm at IPAG’s second pop up gallery space – 11 Don Street, just two doors down from our current home.

    While the artist is in Invercargill, she will be holding a workshop and seminar, both of which are open to the public. 

    Workshop: Wednesday 2nd May 12.30pm
    Under Michele Beevers’s guidance, a community knitted sculpture will be created, which will then be displayed at different locations around the city once completed

    Seminar: Wednesday 2nd May 6pm 
    A chance to hear Michele talk about 'Anatomy Lessons 2005 – 2018' and her inspiration behind the concept.

    All are welcome to the above events, registrations are not required. Simply come along and be part of this unique experience.

    Michele is a Senior Lecturer and the Studio Coordinator for Sculpture and Ceramics at the Dunedin School of Art. She lectures in the undergraduate programme specialising in the History of Modernist Sculpture. She also supervises postgraduate students in the Theory and Practice of Art. Her approach to supervision considers criticality and engagement with contemporary practices. Michele holds Masters degrees from the Canberra School of Art (Australian National University) and Columbia University (New York). Her research concerns a feminist perspective, the issue of sustainability particularly as it affects animals, and with craft and sculpture practices. Michele is involved with the Aramoana Conservation Charitable Trust.

     

    Exhibition Dates: 2-19 May
    Exhibition Hours: Tue-Fri 10AM - 5PM | Sat 12PM - 3.30PM

    Opening: 1 MAY, 6PM (All Welcome)

    WORKSHOP: 2 MAY at 12.30PM

    SEMINAR: 2 MAY at 5.30pm

     

  • Prototype cancer app aimed at younger patients (Apr 30 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic learners have been working with the Southern DHB develop a prototype app aimed at helping adolescents and young adults who are living with cancer.

    The Southern District Health Board (DHB) approached Otago Polytechnic for help to develop an app to meet a need identified by adolescents and young adults (AYA) living with cancer — to have mobile access to their treatment information, aiding their transition to life outside hospital.

    The AYA Rangatahi Uruwhenua passport app would include personal health information, cancer diagnosis, treatment information, follow-up guidelines, information about potential late effects of treatment (for example, the risk of depression), tips for healthy living, and contact details for treatment team members and the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service.

    In the first half of 2017 a team of Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Design (Communication) students created initial screen designs. Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Information Technology students  then used those designs to build an Android app.

    Currently a working prototype, the AYA Rangatahi Uruwhenua passport app has yet to be developed to its full capacity. Final stages of development would include adding password protection. The app would also require DHB onsite server support.

    The AYA Rangatahi Uruwhenua passport app will be on display at Dunedin Techweek, to held on 19-27 May.

    Dunedin Techweek Ambassador and Operations and Engagement Co-ordinator of Dunedin’s SIGNAL ICT Grad School, Kylie Jackson, says Techweek aims to bring together people from within Dunedin’s growing tech sector. It is also a chance for people to explore career options within the sector.

    “This festival will allow the tech community to connect and share expertise. It will show Dunedin to be an up-and-coming tech and innovation centre.

    “We have an abundance of success stories due to the city’s many tech education and research opportunities, and strong ties with industry.

    “We also want to promote tech career opportunities for young people and encourage diversity in tech.”

    Event venues will include Otago Polytechnic, the SIGNAL ICT School for Graduates, Innov8HQ and Petridish co-working space in Vogel St, Otago Museum and Dunedin libraries.

    Read more about Techweek

    Read more about our Bachelor of Design (Communication)

  • Building apprentice heading to national final (Apr 30 2018)

    Gray Brothers Builders apprentice Sam Paris (22) has been crowned king of a castle-making competition at Otago Polytechnic.

    Sam was one of six apprentices competing in the Dunedin heat of the annual New Zealand Certified Builders Apprentice Challenge.

    The regional heats of the annual competition required competitors to spend eight hours constructing a 1.5m-high children's castle playhouse, featuring a turret and working drawbridge.

    Sam now heads to the national final, to be held in conjunction with the 20th Annual NZCB National Conference & Expo in Rotorua on 25-26 May. The finalists will compete for the Ken Read Memorial Trophy and a prize package valued at more than $50,000.

    Read more about our construction programmes

  • Public Seminar: Imagining the Past, Imagining the Future: What’s Memory Got Do With It? (Apr 26 2018)

    3 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    Imagining the Past, Imagining the Future: What’s Memory Got Do With It?

    Chloe Wall, University of Otago

    The artist’s imagination is crucial to her ability to produce art. Philosophically, however, imagination is still poorly understood, and consequently so is the relationship between memory and imagination. Among the work that has been done, there has been very little agreement about what the nature and degree of the relationship is. On one end of the spectrum is the claim that the difference between imagination and memory is whether the event in question really happened or not, while on the other end is the claim that remembering just is imagining the past. The question is further complicated by evidence that thinking about future events is subserved by the same cognitive mechanisms that subserve thinking about the past. So, how are remembering, thinking about the future, and imagining different? The purpose of this talk is to provide a broad overview of the different answers to these questions, and to offer some speculations about their plausibility.

    Chloe Wall is a Ph.D. student in Philosophy at the University of Otago. Her research focusses on memory and testimony and compares how they serve as sources of knowledge.

  • Public Seminar Series: Term 2, Dunedin School of Art 2018 (Apr 26 2018)

    3 MAY-14 JUNE, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

     

    International and national speakers will present on a variety of topics in a weekly seminar series on Thursdays lunchtimes at Dunedin School of Art. All events are held at 19 Riego Street Dunedin, Lecture Theatre P152, except where stated otherwise. Times are included with each event.
    Note: All Thursday seminars are scheduled for 12-1pm. All listed events are open to the public – all welcome, no RSVP and no charge.

    In accordance with the Otago Polytechnic MoU with local Kai Tahu Runaka, we observe tikanga in our lecture and gallery spaces and thus request all attendees to refrain from eating and drinking during events (except water) and from sitting on tables, thank you.
    All enquiries to leoni.schmidt@op.ac.nz except where otherwise indicated. This program is supported by the Fred Staub Open Art.

     

    3 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    Imagining the Past, Imagining the Future: What’s Memory Got Do With It?

    Chloe Wall, University of Otago

    The artist’s imagination is crucial to her ability to produce art. Philosophically, however, imagination is still poorly understood, and consequently so is the relationship between memory and imagination. Among the work that has been done, there has been very little agreement about what the nature and degree of the relationship is. On one end of the spectrum is the claim that the difference between imagination and memory is whether the event in question really happened or not, while on the other end is the claim that remembering just is imagining the past. The question is further complicated by evidence that thinking about future events is subserved by the same cognitive mechanisms that subserve thinking about the past. So, how are remembering, thinking about the future, and imagining different? The purpose of this talk is to provide a broad overview of the different answers to these questions, and to offer some speculations about their plausibility.

    Chloe Wall is a Ph.D. student in Philosophy at the University of Otago. Her research focusses on memory and testimony and compares how they serve as sources of knowledge.

     

    10 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    CLINKProject: Collaboration – Intervention – Exhibition CLINK4

    Johanna Zellmer & Andrew Last, Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    This presentation will report on the collaborative jewellery initiative established in 2014 jointly by Hungry Creek Art & Craft School in Auckland and the Dunedin School of Art (Otago Polytechnic). Every year the two schools join forces to form a collective of undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff for a collaborative event known as CLINKProject, all working collaboratively towards one outcome and a conclusive publication. The projects play with the experience of disruption or intervention, often in the form of unannounced pop-up exhibitions in central Auckland, such as jewellery making on the street or deploying clear plastic umbrellas as moving showcases. Each year’s collective gathers for a frenzied week of brainstorming, planning, collaborative making and public interaction, in an endeavour to share contemporary jewellery with a diverse audience. The first two projects unfolded at the Auckland Inner Link Bus stops (2014) and the courtyards of public institutions such as the Auckland Art Gallery & and City Library (2015). Projects #3 and #4 were working with the challenge of how to enact these driving forces within the context of the public gallery settings of Te Uru Waitekere Contemporary Gallery (2016) and the Auckland Museum in 2017.

    Johanna Zellmer completed a masters degree at the Australian National University Canberra School of Art and a formal apprenticeship as a Goldsmith in Germany. As Studio Coordinator in Jewellery & Metalsmithing she also manages the Artist-in-Residence programme at the Dunedin School of Art. Johanna’s research explores the possibilities of jewellery as a medium of socio-political knowledge.

    Andrew Last is from Melbourne but has lived in Dunedin since 2001. He is a jewellery lecturer in the Dunedin School of Art at Otago Polytechnic, the job that brought him to Aotearoa. Andrew’s art education was at RMIT’s Gold & Silversmithing department and he lectured at Charles Sturt Uni in Wagga for ten years prior to crossing the Tasman. Andrew is a maker of jewellery, sculpture, houses, boats, bikes, bass guitars, bits and bobs. Much of this work goes to friends, family and community, often in a gift economy, occasionally by commission. His recent work is characterised by the relationships between people, place and materials.

     

    17 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Drawn to Sound 

    Hannah Joynt and Jane Venis, School and Design and Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    Drawn to Sound is a performance project in which we address the question “How do we collaborate successfully with two very different creative practices in order to explore new territories within a contemporary context?” In Drawn to Sound we are able to remain based in our separate disciplines yet generate new work collaboratively. Inevitably this pushes our individual practices to otherwise uncharted territory and lead us to deeper understandings of our own and each other’s work.

    Our seminar is in the form of a collaborative performance live in the DSA gallery. Jane will play a range of instruments – including handmade works – in an improvisational way and Hannah responds to the music interpreting the sound as a large scale drawing.

    Hannah Joynt is a contemporary drawing practitioner who works in a range of media, processes and scales. Jane Venis a musician, installation artist and maker of sculptural musical instruments

     

    24 MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    The Art of the Critic

    Ed Hanfling, Dunedin School of Art, Otago Polytechnic

    This seminar provides a critic's perspective on a range of issues associated with the discipline of art criticism, including the relationship between criticism and relativism, the functions of implicit and explicit judgements and the basis for various evaluative criteria, particularly the criterion of "surprise".

    Ed Hanfling is an art historian, critic and curator and lecturer in art history and theory at the Dunedin School of Art.  He has reviewed Auckland exhibitions for the quarterly journal Art New Zealand since 2004.

     

    31MAY, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)         

    Le Maître ignorant? – teaching the history of design in an English medium polytechnic in the Persian Gulf

    David McMaster, Director: Learning & Teaching, Otago Polytechnic

    This paper, drawn from my doctoral work, invokes the figure of Jacques Ranciere’s ‘maitre ignorant’ (Ranciere, 1987/1991) to explore the curriculum design practices and discourses at work in the development of design history courses in an English medium HEI in the Persian Gulf. I argue for the urgent need to decolonise curriculum practice by advocating for the importance of inter-epistemic dialogue.

    David McMaster is Director of Learning and Teaching Development at Otago Polytechnic. Prior to coming to Dunedin, David spent twelve years living and working in the Middle East (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Oman and Bahrain) and has also worked in France, Thailand, China and most recently in Mexico. He is currently working on a PhD in Education at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) on the geopolitics of knowledge in transnational HEIs in the Persian Gulf.

     

    7 JUNE, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Where next for the Otago Museum?

    Dr Ian Griffin, Director: Otago Museum

    2018 marks the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Otago Museum which seems an appropriate occasion to reflect on its past accomplishments, and prognosticate on its future direction.

    Ian Griffin is the 8th Director of the Otago Museum, which first opened in 1868. Joining the Museum in May 2013, Ian has inspired a greater focus on science engagement within the Museum and led the development of the Museums planetarium which opened in December 2015. The Museum will open its new bicultural science centre in December 2017.

    In his spare time, Ian has been actively spreading the message and getting people excited about astronomy, aurora photography and the value of preserving Dunedin’s night skies and currently writes a weekly astronomy column for the Otago Daily times. In recognition of Ian’s contribution to science communication in New Zealand, in 2015 Ian was awarded the Prime Ministers Science Media Communication prize.

    Before joining the Otago Museum, Ian had previously held a number of lead positions in science engagement in the UK and the US including at Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry, at Hubble Telescope Outreach and at NASA’s Education Forum. Ian has also headed, at different times, two planetariums: as CEO of the Stardome Observatory in Auckland and as Director of the Armagh Planetarium in Armagh, Northern Ireland. During Ian’s research for his PhD in astronomy, Ian discovered 26 asteroids, including asteroid 10924 which is named after his wife Maria.

     

    14 JUNE, 12:00-1:00PM, P152, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART, RIEGO ST, (off Albany Street)

    Relationship between space and art works

    Yusam Sung, Asia New Zealand Artist-in-Residence, 2018

    If you look at the two images of space and work apart from each other, they often do not feel common. However, through the various installation methods and forms, both elements are influenced by each other, so that the conflicting feelings that they have are not only reduced or disappear, but they are always seen in the audience as if they were there. Recently, there has been always a lot of worry about the space where the work will be placed in the situation that mainly the 3D works are mainly done. Since the energy of white cubes and other spaces is very different, the works and the ways of installation are always different. The influence of space in my work is becoming more and more important. In recent exhibitions, space has existed as a part of the work, not as a means of showing the art works.

    Yusam Sung was born in 1978 in Korea. He graduated from Hong-ik University in South Korea and received an MFA from Long Island University, New York. He has been exhibiting his work consistently in New York and Seoul.

     

     

  • Castle no child’s play for carpentry apprentices (Apr 20 2018)

    A children’s castle might seem like child’s play, but carpentry apprentices will be taking the challenge of building one very seriously this weekend.

    The regional heats of the annual New Zealand Certified Builders Apprentice Challenge require competitors to spend eight hours constructing a 1.5m-high children's castle playhouse, featuring a turret and working drawbridge.

    A panel of judges will assess a range of building elements, including quality of the workmanship and accuracy.

    Six apprentices will tackle the Dunedin regional heat at Otago Polytechnic's L Block from 8am-4.30pm tomorrow, 21 April. A similar number will do battle at Southern Lakes ITM in Cromwell.

    The winner of each regional event will progress thorough to the national final, to be held in conjunction with the 20th Annual NZCB National Conference & Expo in Rotorua on 25-26 May. The finalists will compete for the Ken Read Memorial Trophy and a prize package valued at more than $50,000.

    Members of the public can watch the apprentices in action tomorrow at Otago Polytechnic's L Block, Anzac Ave, and at Southern Lakes ITM, Cromwell. It is suggested the best time to visit is between 1pm-4.30pm.

    Read more about our construction programmes

     

  • We are now recycling soft plastics. (Apr 19 2018)

    We are now recycling soft plastics.

    We can recycle the following products:

    • Reusable carrier shopping bags (100% polypropylene)
    • Carrier bags
    • Bread, pasta and rice bags
    • Fresh produce bags and net citrus bags
    • Frozen food bags (frozen vegetable, fries, burgers, nuggets, poultry etc.)
    • Confectionery wraps and lolly bags
    • Dairy wrappers
    • Plastic packaging around toilet paper, kitchen towels, nappies and sanitary products
    • Courier packs
    • Newspaper and magazine wraps
    • Chocolate and muesli bar wrappers and biscuit packets (wrapper only)
    • Chip packets
    • Squeeze pouches (keep the lid on)
    • Ice cream wrappers
    • Cereal box liners

     

    How it works

    Collect
    Collect all the soft plastics which you use. Bags should be empty and dry.

    Drop
    Drop them into the soft plastic recycling bin in the Hub.

    Deliver
    Campus Services will deliver them to the soft plastic recycling bins at the supermarkets. At this stage the recycle company only deals with supermarkets but hope to expand their collection points to incorporate educational facilities by the end of 2018.

    Recycle
    The recycling company will then recycle them into fitness circuits, outdoor furniture, bollards and other products such as our own recycling bins.

    The bin is in the Hub at the Dunedin campus and will be cleared weekly.

  • Highlanders lend helping hand to wild bird aviary (Apr 18 2018)

    Fresh from wrangling the Brumbies at the weekend, Pulse Energy Highlanders players Dan Pryor, Tom Franklin and Jackson Hemopo are getting to grips with their next challenge – helping reconfigure an unused aviary at the Dunedin Botanic Garden to aid the rehabilitation of wild birds.

    The Highlanders have formed a community partnership with the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital, which is based at Otago Polytechnic’s School of Veterinary Nursing and is the only specialist wildlife hospital to treat sick and injured native animals in the South Island.

    Botanic Garden team leader Alan Matchett said an application to temporarily house small native ``bush birds'' had been sent to the Department of Conservation.

    After being treated at the Wildlife Hospital, birds could be placed in the aviary in an attempt to further aid their recovery before they were released back into the wild.

    The Highlanders trio will work on the aviary tomorrow morning, 18 April, and will get expert help from Wildlife Hospital supporters Action Engineering and Seaview Cottage Construction, who are donating time and materials.

    "It's awesome to see our community partnership with the Highlanders continuing to blossom and this latest venture is proof that multiple agencies, businesses and partners can work together collaboratively to achieve positive outcomes for our endangered wildlife," Co-chair of the Wildlife Hospital Trust, Steve Walker, says.

    "The Wildlife Hospital Trust — in partnership with the Otago Polytechnic — are extremely grateful to Seaview Cottage Construction Ltd and Action Engineering for donating all of their materials, time and work free of charge in order to see this project succeed.”

    Read more about our Veterinary Nursing programmes

    Read more about the Wildlife Hospital

  • Markmaking to Printmaking with Michel Tuffery (Apr 18 2018)

    Join leading New Zealand artist Michel Tuffery for a two-day printmaking workshop on Rakiura/Stewart Island.

    Designed to develop confidence as well as encourage experimentation with markmaking, Tuffery encourages participants to bring along any drawing concepts and images or he’ll help you generate new ideas. Processes include drawing and composition, chisel relief printing techniques, ink application, press and registration. There is a focus on creating a range of A3 finished print works.

    A full description of the workshop and required materials is available upon registration. Cost: $150, plus $35 for materials (transport and accommodation not included).

    26th-27 May, Rakiura/Stewart Island

    For more information, email: visitus@stewartisland.co.nz

  • iD Fashion forging fresh paths (Apr 17 2018)

    Now the centrepiece of iD Dunedin Fashion Week, the International Emerging Designer Show will feature an unusual, circuitous catwalk at the Dunedin Town Hall next month.

    Eschewing the Dunedin Railway Station runway used for many years, the event will see models perform two Octagon-shaped circuits of the Town Hall as well as ascend to the gallery.

    As well as the emerging designer shows on the Thursday and Friday, this year’s fashion week — to be held from 1-6 May — will feature around 40 associated events, from art exhibitions to brewery tours and  library tours.

    Dr Margo Barton,iD Dunedin Fashion Week committee chairwoman and Otago Polytechnic academic leader of fashion, is “100% sure” the Town Hall show will "blow attendees out of the water".

    Read the Otago Daily Times article

     

  • Call for Papers: Scope (Health and Wellbeing) (Apr 12 2018)

    Submissions are sought by 27 July 2018 for our Scope (Health & Wellbeing) journal.

    Scope Contemporary Research Topics in Health & Wellbeing is an open access, peer reviewed journal published annually by Otago Polytechnic. It is edited in partnership with the School of Nursing and the College of Te Ohu Ora (School of Occupational Therapy and Institute of Sport & Adventure). The journal aims to reflect and disseminate research done in health and wellbeing settings, while making connections with related work within our communities of practice.

    The 2018 issue of Scope (Health & Wellbeing) will focus on the theme of ’Occupation’, which aims to bring together a collection of papers across the sciences, on those aspects of occupation that matter most to academics, practitioners, educators and policy makers within health. This will include studies and methodologies exploring the various occupations within health and wellbeing, as well as the multifaceted definition of occupation within a health context, as a vocation, place, activity, state of mind or other related definitions.

    Please submit your contribution to scopehealthwellbeing@op.ac.nz by Friday 27 July 2018. For submission guidelines, see below.

    If you have a specific enquiry regarding your submission, please address this to the relevant member of the editorial team:

    General submission guidelines

    • Send a digital Word document to the Scope (Health & Wellbeing, Occupation) Editorial Team at scopehealthwellbeing@op.ac.nz by Friday 27 July 2018.
    • Cover page: Supply the following information on a separate cover page: Name of author(s); contact email; contact telephone number; postal address, word count; number of images included in text.
    • Author’s biography: Send an updated bio of each author with your submission, briefly outlining their professional background and experience. Please limit each biography to 100 words.

     Text

    • Submit only Word documents.
    • Word limit of 4000 words
    • Clearly name your file, e.g. “smith.doc”.
    • Single line spacing
    • Please do not apply indentations, tabulations or any such formatting to text.
    • Formatting and citations to follow APA 6th Edition
    • Captions for images should be numbered, should be complete, and should adhere to a sequence of information. See examples at www.thescopes.org

    Images

    • Format: Images must be supplied as jpeg or tif formats.
    • Colour: Greyscale or CMYK (check under image > mode in Photoshop).
    • Quality: 300dpi minimum at printed image size. Maximum image print area is 140mm wide x 190 deep.
    • Labelling: Name all image files with your name and number the images in the order they appear in your document, e.g. “smith.1.tif”, “smith.2.tif”.
    • Other: Email or send via an online dropbox folder with high quality images (minimum 300dpi) saved as jpeg or tif. Please label all image files and number them in the order you wish them to appear. Please note combined 10MB limit on emailed items (Images may need to be sent separately).
  • AIC celebrates the graduation of 145 international students (Apr 12 2018)

    This week Auckland International Campus (AIC) will celebrate the graduation of 145 of its international students.

     Gagan Sachdeva, Chief Executive AIC, says graduation is the culmination of the hard work of students and staff. 

    "It’s great to see our graduands representing many different nations including Bangladesh, China, India, Italy, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Philippines, Russian Federation, Sri Lanka, Taiwan and Vietnam. A huge congratulations and best wishes for a new beginning to all of our graduands. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the entire team at AIC who work tirelessly to see our learners succeed. A very special thanks also goes to all of our colleagues at the Dunedin campus for their continued support and encouragement in providing a stimulating learning environment at AIC," he says.

    Graduands include Capable NZ students.

    Glenys Forsyth, Head of School Capable NZ, says, "Capable NZ has 32 learners graduating in Auckland tomorrow. This adds to the 91 graduates from the March graduation. Studying whilst working full-time and negotiating family commitments is no easy task, and the learners are to be commended for the effort they put into completing their studies. As Head of School, graduation is a special occasion for me, not only because it gives me the opportunity to acknowledge learners’ achievement but to  also acknowledge the work my staff do to support learners throughout their journey. At a recent graduation one learner put his qualification into perspective by saying, It didn’t take me 10 months to  complete my Bachelor of Engineering, rather it took me 40 years."

  • Holly claims Commonwealth silver (Apr 10 2018)

    Congratulations to New Zealand javelin thrower Holly Robinson, who has won a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games.

    The 23-year-old Otago Polytechnic Bachelor of Applied Science graduate threw 43.32m with her first of six throws in the F46 javelin final at Carrara Stadium, Gold Coast, on Monday night, breaking Hollie Arnold's (Wales) world record by 30cm. 

    However, Arnold snatched victory (and the record) from Robinson with a final throw of 44.43m.

    Robinson, who was born with a shortened left arm, won silver at the 2016 Rio Paralympics, losing to Arnold by 1.79m.

    Robinson said finishing second again was tough, but she was happy with her performance.

    "Although I've got to settle for second place, I did throw further than I've ever thrown before to get that silver medal and I'm absolutely stoked with that,” she told Stuff. 

    Robinson was born with her left arm missing below the elbow but has always been “sporty”. Her earliest memory is playing rugby with her twin brother in Hokitika when she was three years old.

    At the age of 12, she “decided to start getting serious about something” and focused on javelin throwing and, at 16, was offered a scholarship to train with a Paralympic coach in Dunedin. In 2012 she represented New Zealand at the London Paralympics. 

    The year 2012 was also Holly’s last of school.

    “I had no clue what I wanted to do, so I looked at the Bachelor of Applied Science (Physical Activity, Health and Wellness) degree at Otago Polytechnic.  It was a practical and applied qualification, and I liked that. It’s sort of the way I learn.”

    Read more about the Bachelor of Applied Science (Physical Activity, Health and Wellness)

  • Celebrating Dunedin Pride 2018 (Apr 09 2018)

    Otago Polytechnic is celebrating Dunedin Pride 2018 with a range of events this week.

    The Queerest Quiz promises a night of fun in the Hub tomorrow night.

    In addition, Michael Stevens, from Rainbow Tick, is taking part in a range of events and workshops as part of our annual re-accreditation audit.

    “Otago Polytechnic prides itself on being an inclusive organisation,” Chief Executive Phil Ker says.

    “In our experience it is the richness of our diversity that makes us an innovative and successful organisation.

    “We are proud to have been the first ITP (Institute of Technology and Polytechnics) in New Zealand to have been awarded the Rainbow Tick and one of the first organisations in the South Island to gain the certification.”

    Otago Polytechnic’s efforts to become a more diverse, open and inclusive workplace include reviewing and amending policies to ensure they reflect an organisation that recognises and welcomes sexual and gender diversity.

    We are also establishing An Ally Network, in support of LGBTTIFQ inclusion. We now have a number of all gender toilets about on campus. In addition, from 2019, students will be able to select a gender other than the current binary option of male or female when they enrol.

    Read more about Dunedin Pride 2018

    Read more about Rainbow Tick

  • Exhibition: University of Applied Arts Vienna (Apr 05 2018)

    12 APRIL - 11 MAY, DUNEDIN SCHOOL OF ART GALLERY, RIEGO STREET, DUNEDIN

    Understanding Art & Research
    University of Applied Arts Vienna

    Exhibition dates: 12 April - 11 May, 2018

    Exhibition opening: 12 April, 5pm - 7pm

    Gallery hours: Monday to Friday 10am - 4pm